Special Issue "Economics of Water Resources Management"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Phoebe Koundouri
Website
Guest Editor
School of Economics and ReSEES Laboratory, Athens University of Economics and Business, Athina, Greece
Interests: water economics; environmental economics; sustainability; sustainable development goals; integrated water resource management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ebun Akinsete
Website
Guest Editor
ICRE8 (The International Centre for Research on the Environment and the Economy)
Interests: sustainable development, urban regeneration, Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) policy and implementation, community development, climate change mitigation, renewable energy, stakeholder participation, participatory planning, evaluation and impact assessment for sustainability, sustainability in developing nations
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water constitutes a crucial input for development in all sectors of the economy; as such its optimal management remains a critical challenge for policy makers, industry practitioners, and academics alike. This Special Issue focuses on economic approaches to sustainble management of water as a resource.  We invite reviews, as well as original research articles, which seek to explore the intersection between issues to do with water-use, economic resource management, and sustainable development as it applies to this context.

Prof. Dr. Phoebe Koundouri
Dr. Ebun Akinsete
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Water
  • Sustainable Resource Management
  • Integrated Management
  • Modelling
  • Sustianability
  • River Basin Management
  • Policy and Governance
  • Ecosystem Services
  • Multidisciplinary Approach

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
An Analysis of a Water Use Decoupling Index and Its Spatial Migration Characteristics Based on Extracting Trend Components: A Case Study of the Poyang Lake Basin
Water 2019, 11(5), 1027; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11051027 - 16 May 2019
Abstract
Water resources and their utilization perform a critical role in sustainable development. A full comprehension of the decoupling relationship between water consumption and economic development is a prerequisite for sustainable water resource management. This thesis developed a decoupling index analysis model based on [...] Read more.
Water resources and their utilization perform a critical role in sustainable development. A full comprehension of the decoupling relationship between water consumption and economic development is a prerequisite for sustainable water resource management. This thesis developed a decoupling index analysis model based on Hodrick–Prescott filtering; analyzed the spatial aggregation characteristics of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), water consumption, and the decoupling index by the Global and Local Moran’s Index; and calculated the spatial gravity migration characteristics of GDP, water consumption, and the decoupling index. A case study in the Poyang Lake basin was selected to analyze the relationship between water and the economy. The results indicated that decoupling status was steadier after extracting trend components. The decoupling index exhibited spatial outlier characteristics. The spatial gravity center migration directions of GDP and water consumption were opposite. Furthermore, the Poyang Lake basin was in a weak decoupling status, and its water use pattern was sustainable to a certain extent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Water Resources Management)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Assessing the Effectiveness of the WFD as a Tool to Address Different Levels of Water Scarcity Based on Two Case Studies of the Mediterranean Region
Water 2019, 11(4), 840; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11040840 - 21 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Despite being a natural phenomenon, water scarcity is, to a great extent, human-induced, particularly affected by climate change and by the increased water resources vulnerability. The Water Framework Directive (WFD), an ‘umbrella’ directive that aims to provide holistic approaches to the management of [...] Read more.
Despite being a natural phenomenon, water scarcity is, to a great extent, human-induced, particularly affected by climate change and by the increased water resources vulnerability. The Water Framework Directive (WFD), an ‘umbrella’ directive that aims to provide holistic approaches to the management of water resources and is supported by a number of Communication documents on water scarcity, requires for prompt responses to ensure ‘healthy’ water bodies of good ecological status. The current paper presents a multidisciplinary approach, developed and engaged within the Globaqua Project, to provide an assessment of the main challenges towards addressing water scarcity with emphasis on the climate change projections, in two Mediterranean regions. The current paper attempts to critically assess the effectiveness of the WFD as a tool to address water scarcity and increase sustainability in resource use. Criticism lies on the fact that the WFD does not directly refer to it, still, water scarcity is recognized as a factor that increases stress on water resources and deteriorates their status. In addition, the Program of Measures (PoMs) within the WFD clearly contribute to reducing vulnerability of water resources and to ensure current and future water use, also under the impact of the projected climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Water Resources Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Sharing Reasoning Behind Individual Decisions to Invest in Joint Infrastructure
Water 2019, 11(4), 798; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11040798 - 17 Apr 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Development of joint irrigation infrastructure increasingly depends on investment decisions made by individual farmers. Farmers base their decisions to invest on their current knowledge and understanding. As irrigation infrastructure development is ultimately a group decision, it is beneficial if individuals have a common [...] Read more.
Development of joint irrigation infrastructure increasingly depends on investment decisions made by individual farmers. Farmers base their decisions to invest on their current knowledge and understanding. As irrigation infrastructure development is ultimately a group decision, it is beneficial if individuals have a common understanding of the various values at stake. Sharing the personal reasoning behind individual decisions is a promising approach to build such common understanding. This study demonstrates application of participatory crossover analysis at a workshop in Tasmania, Australia. The workshop gave farmers the opportunity to discuss their broader considerations in investment decisions, beyond just financial or monetary factors. It centered on the question, “In what conditions would you—the individual farmer—invest?” The participants’ willingness to pay, in the form of crossover points, was presented as a set of scenarios to start an explorative discussion between irrigators and non-irrigators. Evaluation feedback indicates that the workshop enabled participants to share new information, improved understanding of differences between neighbors, and generated more respect for others and their decisions. As expected, reasoning went beyond economic concerns, and changed over time. Lifestyle choices, long-term intergenerational planning, perceived risks, and intrinsic motivations emerged as factors influencing water valuation. Simply having a facilitated discussion about the reasons underlying individuals’ willingness to pay seems to be a useful tool for better informed decision-making about joint irrigation infrastructure, and is worth testing in further case studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Water Resources Management)
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Open AccessArticle
The Link between Ecosystem Services and Human Wellbeing in the Implementation of the European Water Framework Directive: Assessing Four River Basins in Europe
Water 2019, 11(3), 508; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11030508 - 11 Mar 2019
Abstract
This paper explores the relationship between the environment and human wellbeing whilst considering water resource pressures in the context of ecosystem services, before assessing the management actions to facilitate human wellbeing under the European Union’s Water Framework Directive (WFD). By focusing on four [...] Read more.
This paper explores the relationship between the environment and human wellbeing whilst considering water resource pressures in the context of ecosystem services, before assessing the management actions to facilitate human wellbeing under the European Union’s Water Framework Directive (WFD). By focusing on four river basins in four European countries currently working to implement the WFD, we explore the effects of multiple pressures faced within each one on human wellbeing. Under an Ecosystem Services framework, we identify those effects and consolidate them into Human Wellbeing Factors to assess the management actions. Then, by conducting a qualitative content analysis, we assess the effectiveness of each Program of Measures at river basin level and relate them to Human Wellbeing Factors. Findings indicate that factors such as population growth trends intensify the effects of these pressures on human wellbeing. Finally, the paper pinpoints that human wellbeing must remain an ever-present consideration to be weighed against any other competing policy objectives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Water Resources Management)
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Open AccessArticle
The Threshold Effect of Environmental Regulation, FDI Agglomeration, and Water Utilization Efficiency under “Double Control Actions”—An Empirical Test Based on Yangtze River Economic Belt
Water 2019, 11(3), 452; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11030452 - 03 Mar 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
In this study, the SE-SBM model considering undesirable outputs was used to measure the water utilization efficiency of the Yangtze River Economic Belt from 2006 to 2016, and the panel threshold model was used to estimate the impact of environmental regulation and foreign [...] Read more.
In this study, the SE-SBM model considering undesirable outputs was used to measure the water utilization efficiency of the Yangtze River Economic Belt from 2006 to 2016, and the panel threshold model was used to estimate the impact of environmental regulation and foreign direct investment (FDI) agglomeration on water utilization efficiency. The results show that the water utilization efficiency presents a “U”-shaped trend as a whole, declines incrementally along the eastern, central, and western regions of the economic belt, and that the water utilization efficiency of the economic belt first converges and then diverges. In the estimation of the double threshold panel model, when the per capita GDP is lower than 2.635 or greater than 12.058 thousand dollars, the environmental regulation shows a significant positive effect. Otherwise, the environmental regulation barely shows a significant negative effect. FDI has not had a great impact on water resources utilization efficiency, and neither the “pollution aura” nor “pollution shelter” are significant. When the per capita GDP is lower than 2.184 or greater than 12.058 thousand dollars, FDI can significantly improve the water utilization efficiency through environmental regulation. Besides, the positive effects of technological innovation and foreign trade dependence are significant, and so are the negative effects of industrialization. Differentiated environmental regulation policies should be formulated; industrial upgrade should be promoted; innovation of water-saving and emission reduction should be strengthened in the Yangtze River Economic Belt. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Water Resources Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Qualifying Coordination Mechanism for Cascade-Reservoir Operation with a New Game-Theoretical Methodology
Water 2018, 10(12), 1857; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10121857 - 14 Dec 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
The coordinated operation for hydropower generation in cascade reservoirs is critical to resolve the conflicts in hydropower needs between upstream and downstream reservoirs. Due to the individual rationality and collective rationality highlighted by game theory, we propose an integrated game-theoretical model to simulate [...] Read more.
The coordinated operation for hydropower generation in cascade reservoirs is critical to resolve the conflicts in hydropower needs between upstream and downstream reservoirs. Due to the individual rationality and collective rationality highlighted by game theory, we propose an integrated game-theoretical model to simulate the coordination behaviors among cascade reservoirs for hydropower generation. In the case study of a cascade-reservoir system in the Yangtze River of China, three operation models are compared and analyzed: the non-cooperative model, centralized model, and integrated game-theoretical model. The factors influencing the coordination efficiency of the integrated game-theoretical model are also explored in this study. The results indicate that the system’s hydropower generation obtained by the integrated game-theoretical model is closer to the ideal solution obtained by the centralized model compared to that obtained by the non-cooperative model. Moreover, individual hydropower generation in non-cooperation (rational individual gains) is guaranteed by the integrated game-theoretical model, which is neglected by the centralized model. Furthermore, the coordination efficiency of the integrated game-theoretical model is influenced by the water availability variation and regulation capacities of cascade reservoirs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Water Resources Management)
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Open AccessCommentary
Marrying Unmarried Literatures: The Water Footprint and Environmental (Economic) Valuation
Water 2018, 10(12), 1815; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10121815 - 10 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
In this commentary, we set out the rationale for bringing together two research fields: Water Footprint Assessment and environmental (economic) valuation, which have evolved separately. This has the potential to inform the efficient allocation of virtual water flows at a global scale. It [...] Read more.
In this commentary, we set out the rationale for bringing together two research fields: Water Footprint Assessment and environmental (economic) valuation, which have evolved separately. This has the potential to inform the efficient allocation of virtual water flows at a global scale. It would also address some of the aims and objectives in the Water Footprint Assessment Manual regarding the assessment of environmental impacts and their sustainability, which thus far have not been covered in the literature. We also indicate how established practice in the environmental valuation community would need to develop to facilitate productive exchange between the two fields. Finally, we outline the key developments in the non-peer reviewed grey literature that signal the merit of such an exchange. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Water Resources Management)
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