Advances in Urban Groundwater and Sustainable Water Resources Management and Planning II

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management, Policy and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 4735

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Cartography and Applied Geology, Department of Geotechnical Engineering, School of Engineering (ISEP), Polytechnic of Porto, Rua do Dr. A. Bernardino de Almeida, 431, 4200-072 Porto, Portugal
Interests: hydrogeological mapping and GIS-based mapping for water resources; hard-rock hydrogeology and water resources; urban groundwater for sustainable water resources management and planning; vulnerability mapping and geohazards; groundwater, geotechnics and rock engineering; hydrogeomechanics and underground environments; history of hydrogeology; military geosciences and groundwater; higher education dissemination and geoprofessional core values
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering Materials Environment (DICMA), Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: geochemistry; hydrogeochemistry; groundwater; geochemistry of sustainable processes; geochemical assessment of environmental quality; isotopic geochemistry; groundwater pollution; groundwater remediation; water quality; water safety; sustainable development; environmental geochemistry; climate change; earthquakes; drinking water
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Cartography and Applied Geology, Department of Geotechnical Engineering, School of Engineering (ISEP), Polytechnic of Porto, Rua do Dr. A. Bernardino de Almeida, 431 - 4200-072 Porto, Portugal
Interests: urban groundwater for sustainable water resources management and planning; urban vulnerability mapping and geohazards; hard-rock hydrogeology and water resources; hydrogeochemistry in both natural and anthropogenic environments; rock–water interactions; hydromineral resources and geothermics; hydrogeotechnics and water well; applied geology and geotechnics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In nature, urban groundwater propels many processes, including climatic, geological, geomorphic, geochemical, ecotoxicological, and hydraulic processes, sustaining several ecological purposes and services. Urban development has a profound impact on hydrological systems. Additional issues concerning water resource sustainability and hydrological cycle comprehension are added to by urbanization. The anatomy of the urban underground is constituted by an intricate network of pipes, conduits, channels, galleries, storm sewers, and other structures that alter the hydraulic conductivity of geomaterials. In addition, the release of compounds from urban infrastructure alters the chemistry of the surrounding environment and affects water quality. Urban streams (some of them also being channeled and shallow buried) receive dissolved and particulate chemical loadings from runoff, sewer connections, direct discharge from other waterways, and interactions with groundwater. The chemistry of urban runoff tends to be dominated by material associated with or accumulated on impervious surfaces, such as heavy metals and deicing salt from roadways. Sewage treatment plants are typically designed to remove some, but not all human-produced compounds and suspended material from water. Consequently, these urban buried features act as favorable pathways for the fluid flow of urban-sourced contaminants into groundwater resources. In addition, ground surfaces are generally covered and perceived as virtually impervious (e.g., buildings, asphalt, concrete, or brick). Today, environmental pressures affect urban groundwater systems, which are faced with increasing urban pressure, overexploitation, contamination/pollution issues, and climate variability.

A paradigm shift based on holistic management is required to design sustainable water systems. Consequently, an urban water framework must be based not only on sustainable technical–scientific studies but also on socioeconomic, cultural, heritage, and ethical challenges.

This Special Issue emphasizes the presentation and discussion of key studies, model-urban and peri-urban areas, new methods, original papers, and review articles that describe the current state of the art on the challenges and emerging fields related to the mapping, characterization, assessment, mitigation, and protection of sustainable groundwater systems, water–ground interactions, and water resources in urban areas.

Potential topics in urban areas include but are not limited to the following: hydrogeological mapping, hydrogeochemistry, isotope hydrology, hydraulics, water resources, groundwater engineering, and modeling. Other emerging fields in urban studies are most welcome, such as: urban GIS mapping, geovisualization, and UAV techniques; urban hydrogeomorphology and planning; rural hydrogeology and small-scale water resources management; hydrotoponymy, historical cities, and cultural heritage; smart cities and groundwater; cities, water security and services; and groundwater ethics and urban areas management.

Prof. Dr. Helder I. Chaminé
Prof. Dr. Maurizio Barbieri
Prof. Dr. Maria José Afonso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban hydrological cycle
  • groundwater GIS mapping for urban areas
  • urban hydrogeochemistry and isotopic hydrology
  • urban hydraulics and hydrodynamics
  • urban groundwater recharge
  • urban groundwater, planning, and engineering
  • urban conceptual models and numerical modeling
  • integrated water resources management for urban areas
  • geochemical change
  • ecotoxicology, geomicrobiology, and hydrobiology studies in urban environments
  • environmental risk assessment for urban areas
  • urban groundwater and geohazards
  • uncertainty, variability, and climate change impacts in urban groundwater systems
  • ethics, environment, society, and groundwater for urban areas

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

18 pages, 6190 KiB  
Article
Integrating RUSLE Model with Cloud-Based Geospatial Analysis: A Google Earth Engine Approach for Soil Erosion Assessment in the Satluj Watershed
by Anshul Sud, Bhartendu Sajan, Shruti Kanga, Suraj Kumar Singh, Saurabh Singh, Bojan Durin, Pankaj Kumar, Gowhar Meraj, Dhrubajyoti Sahariah, Jatan Debnath and Kesar Chand
Water 2024, 16(8), 1073; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16081073 - 9 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1975
Abstract
This study employed an advanced geospatial methodology using the Google Earth Engine (GEE) platform to assess soil erosion in the Satluj Watershed thoroughly. To achieve this, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model was integrated into the study, which was revealed through [...] Read more.
This study employed an advanced geospatial methodology using the Google Earth Engine (GEE) platform to assess soil erosion in the Satluj Watershed thoroughly. To achieve this, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model was integrated into the study, which was revealed through several analytical tiers, each with a unique function. The study commenced with estimating the R factor, which was carried out using annual precipitation data from the Climate Hazards Group Infra-Red Precipitation with Station (CHIRPS). The erodibility of the soil, which the K factor describes, was then calculated using the USDA soil texture classifications taken from the Open Land Map. The third layer emphasizes the LS factor, which analyzes slope data and how they affect soil erosion rates, using digital elevation models. To understand the impact of vegetation on soil conservation, the fourth layer presents the C factor, which evaluates changes in land cover, and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from Sentinel-2 data. The P factor incorporates MODIS data to assess the types of land cover and slope conditions. Combining these layers with the RUSLE model produces a thorough soil loss map, revealing different levels of soil erosion throughout the Satluj Watershed. The preliminary findings indicate that 3.3% of the watershed had slight soil loss, 0.2% had moderate loss, and 1.2% had high soil erosion rates. And 92% had severe rates of soil erosion. After a thorough investigation, the detected regions were divided into risk classifications, providing vital information for the watershed’s land management and conservation plans. The mean soil loss throughout the watershed was determined to be 10,740 tons/ha/year. This novel method creates a strong foundation for evaluating soil erosion, while also highlighting the value of the cloud-based geospatial analysis and the RUSLE model in comprehending intricate environmental processes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 5297 KiB  
Article
Trend Analysis of Streamflows in Relation to Precipitation: A Case Study in Central Italy
by Matteo Gentilucci, Sophie Ingrid Djouohou, Maurizio Barbieri, Younes Hamed and Gilberto Pambianchi
Water 2023, 15(8), 1586; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15081586 - 19 Apr 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2098
Abstract
The monitoring of water resources is becoming increasingly important for humid temperate climates in light of climate change, which shows a generalised increase in temperatures and a decrease in precipitation, which is not generalised but relative to the area of interest. In this [...] Read more.
The monitoring of water resources is becoming increasingly important for humid temperate climates in light of climate change, which shows a generalised increase in temperatures and a decrease in precipitation, which is not generalised but relative to the area of interest. In this context, it is interesting to understand what the climatic changes have been, in terms of precipitation and how they have affected streamflows, by analysing them on a monthly basis. At the basin scale, interpolations were carried out with geostatistical methods using GIS software, spatialising the areal distribution of precipitation and obtaining an average value that can be correlated with water flows. As a pilot project, this research analysed the Upper Potenza basin in relation to the flow rates of the Potenza River over two reference periods, from 1964 to 1979 and from 2005 to 2020. The results show a decreasing trend in streamflows within the studied basin, while the precipitation trend decreases for the period 1964–1979 and increases for the period 2005–2020. Effective precipitation, in turn, shows a rather pronounced decrease in the more recent 2005–2020 period, due to climate change influencing the increase in temperature and consequently, the increase in evapotranspiration. In this context, it is significant to note that the Pearson correlation coefficient of streamflow to effective rainfall for both periods is about 0.8, suggesting that the net of anthropogenic disturbances, streamflow and actual precipitation maintain a high correlation. This model could be exported to other territories, in order to gain a global view for a better understanding and subsequent adaptation to ongoing climate change. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop