Special Issue "New Challenges: Modelling the Water Quality of Surface Waters with Ice Cover"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Karl-Erich Lindenschmidt
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Global Institute for Water Security, University of Saskatchewan, 11 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 3H5 Canada
Interests: surface water quality modelling; fluvial geomorphology; global sensitivity and uncertainty analyses; hydrological and hydraulic modelling; nutrient transport modelling; modelling river ice processes
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Modelling the quality of surface waters under ice-covered conditions is an understudied topic of research, but is gaining momentum due to the realisation within the scientific community of its importance in the understanding of the year-round ecological functioning of aquatic ecosystems. As recent studies have shown, assuming the “dormancy” of these under-ice ecosystems compared to open-water conditions, is a limitation to the holistic view of how these ecosystems function. For instance, the water-quality conditions during winter can have a marked effect on the successive spring and summer succession of phytoplankton species and algal–nutrient dynamics. Also, within the scope of the future climate, changing ice phenologies will impact surface water quality and even exacerbate changes in all-year dynamics. Modelling helps us to better understand these inter-seasonal influences and predict the impacts of future changes in our environment. It is against this backdrop that I invite you to submit your paper to this Special Issue, to promote scientific awareness of this important topic.

Prof. Dr. Karl-Erich Lindenschmidt
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • environmental change
  • ice covers
  • ice phenology, lakes
  • modelling
  • ponds
  • rivers
  • surface water quality
  • wetlands

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
The Migration Law of Iron during the Process of Water Icing
Water 2020, 12(2), 441; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12020441 - 06 Feb 2020
Abstract
In this study, we utilized simulated icing experiments to investigate the effect of icing thickness, freezing temperature and initial concentration on the migration of iron in the ice–water system during water icing. The distribution coefficient “K” (the ratio of the average concentration of [...] Read more.
In this study, we utilized simulated icing experiments to investigate the effect of icing thickness, freezing temperature and initial concentration on the migration of iron in the ice–water system during water icing. The distribution coefficient “K” (the ratio of the average concentration of iron in the ice to that in the under-ice water) was used to describe the effect. The results indicated that iron partitioned stronger to under-ice water than to ice during the process of water icing, resulting in the concentration of iron in ice–water system before and after freezing being expressed as: ice < pre-freezing water < under-ice water. K decreased with the increase in icing thickness, freezing temperature and initial concentration. The temperature change in the solution will change the solubility of the solvent, so we explained the migration of iron during the process of water icing from the perspective of solid–liquid equilibrium theory. Too high or too low iron concentration may inhibit the growth of algae, thus affecting the underwater ecological environment. We expect that our study will arouse researcher’s attention to the change in iron concentration in shallow lakes and ponds at high latitudes during the icebound period. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Research on the Migration of the Total Manganese during the Process of Water Icing
Water 2019, 11(8), 1626; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11081626 - 07 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Our research focused on the migration law of the total manganese (TMn) during the process of water icing. We utilized two experimental methods: (1) natural icing and (2) simulated icing. While using laboratory simulation, we explored the effects of ice thickness, freezing temperature, [...] Read more.
Our research focused on the migration law of the total manganese (TMn) during the process of water icing. We utilized two experimental methods: (1) natural icing and (2) simulated icing. While using laboratory simulation, we explored the effects of ice thickness, freezing temperature, and initial concentrations on the migration of TMn in the ice-water system. The distribution coefficient “K” (the ratio of the average concentration of TMn in the ice body to the average concentration of TMn in the under-ice water body) was used to characterize it. The results indicated that TMn continuously migrated from ice to under-ice water during the process of water icing. The concentration of TMn in the ice was the upper layer < middle layer < lower layer, and K decreases as the ice thickness, freezing temperature, and initial concentration increased. We explained the migration of TMn during the process of water icing from the perspective of crystallography. Our research can arouse other researcher’s attention towards the change of TMn concentration in lakes in high latitudes during the icebound period. Full article
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Open AccessCommentary
Development of an Ice Jam Flood Forecasting System for the Lower Oder River—Requirements for Real-Time Predictions of Water, Ice and Sediment Transport
Water 2019, 11(1), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11010095 - 08 Jan 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
Despite ubiquitous warming, the lower Oder River typically freezes over almost every year. Ice jams may occur during freeze-up and ice cover breakup phases, particularly in the middle and lower reaches of the river, with weirs and piers. The slush ice and ice [...] Read more.
Despite ubiquitous warming, the lower Oder River typically freezes over almost every year. Ice jams may occur during freeze-up and ice cover breakup phases, particularly in the middle and lower reaches of the river, with weirs and piers. The slush ice and ice blocks may accumulate to form ice jams, leading to backwater effects and substantial water level rise. The small bottom slope of the lower Oder and the tidal backflow from the Baltic Sea enhance the formation of ice jams during cold weather conditions, jeopardizing the dikes. Therefore, development of an ice jam flood forecasting system for the Oder River is much needed. This commentary presents selected results from an international workshop that took place in Wrocław (Poland) on 26–27 November 2018 that brought together an international team of experts to explore the requirements and research opportunities in the field of ice jam flood forecasting and risk assessment for the Oder River section along the German–Polish border. The workshop launched a platform for collaboration amongst Canadian, German and Polish scientists, government officials and water managers to pave a way forward for joint research focused on achieving the long-term goal of forecasting, assessing and mitigating ice jam impacts along the lower Oder. German and Polish government agencies are in need of new tools to forecast ice jams and assess their subsequent consequences and risks to communities and ship navigation along a river. Addressing these issues will also help research and ice flood management in a Canadian context. A research program would aim to develop a modelling system by addressing fundamental issues that impede the prediction of ice jam events and their consequences in cold regions. Full article
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