Special Issue "Effects of Species Introduction on Aquatic Communities"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Frédéric Santoul
Website
Guest Editor
EcoLab (UMR5245 CNRS-UPS-INPT) University Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier
Interests: species introduction; aquatic communities; fish; top-predator; trophic interactions
Dr. Stéphanie Boulêtreau
Website
Guest Editor
EcoLab (UMR5245 CNRS-UPS-INPT) University Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier
Interests: species introduction; aquatic communities; microbial communities; warming effect; stable isotope analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aquatic communities are deeply affected by human pressure such as species introduction, which remains a major concern for these communities. The arrival of new species can result in different ecological effects, and sometimes leads to biological invasions and adverse impact. Introduced species establish new interactions (e.g., predation, parasitism, competition) with the recipient community that can modify the aquatic community structure, composition, and functions. We especially lack information on how species introduction can be a dominant force in regulating aquatic communities by its creation of new interactions. Analyses of the life history traits (e.g., nest-guarding) of these introduced species can also be of importance to understand how these species become established in aquatic ecosystems. Understanding these traits and interactions remains a key concern of conservation biology. The aim of this Special Issue of Water is to explore these topics, although other topics (e.g., behavior, molecular approaches) are also welcome.

Dr. Frédéric Santoul
Dr. Stéphanie Boulêtreau
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • species introduction
  • aquatic communities
  • direct/indirect interactions
  • trophic levels
  • biological traits
  • ecological impacts

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Identification of the Invasive Form of Corbicula Clams in Ireland
Water 2019, 11(8), 1652; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11081652 - 10 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The basket clam genus, Corbicula, commonly known as the Asian clam, has become one of the most internationally high-profile and widespread aquatic invasive species. This genus is now considered to comprise a polymorphic species complex. The international invasion of Corbicula is characterised [...] Read more.
The basket clam genus, Corbicula, commonly known as the Asian clam, has become one of the most internationally high-profile and widespread aquatic invasive species. This genus is now considered to comprise a polymorphic species complex. The international invasion of Corbicula is characterised by four lineages, each fixed for one morphotype, genotype and haplotype combination: the American form (A) and European round form (R), the American form (C) and European saddle from (S), American form B, form round light colour (Rlc) and an intermediate between forms R and S known as Int. We investigated the genetic and morphometric makeup of each Irish population in order to establish which invasive lineages were present so as to identify the number of introductions to Ireland. A combination of morphometric, mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) gene analysis and microsatellite markers were used to determine the invasive form at each Irish site. All Irish Corbicula samples conformed morphometrically to the invasive form A/R. All mtCOI sequences retrieved for 25 Irish individuals were identical to the international A/R form, while microsatellite markers again showed a common clustering with the international A/R forms of Corbicula. The combined approach of morphometries, total genomic DNA and microsatellite markers indicate only one form of Corbicula invaded Ireland; the international A/R form. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Species Introduction on Aquatic Communities)
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Open AccessArticle
Migration of Non-Native Predator Asp (Leuciscus aspius) from a Reservoir Poses a Potential Threat to Native Species in Tributaries
Water 2019, 11(6), 1306; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11061306 - 25 Jun 2019
Abstract
The introduction of non-native species and human-altered habitats are currently the main threats to freshwater ecosystems. Due to predation and competition, biological invaders can cause extinctions and imperil the status of native species, and this phenomenon is enhanced by habitat alteration, for example, [...] Read more.
The introduction of non-native species and human-altered habitats are currently the main threats to freshwater ecosystems. Due to predation and competition, biological invaders can cause extinctions and imperil the status of native species, and this phenomenon is enhanced by habitat alteration, for example, dam construction. In addition to river fragmentation caused by dam construction, the impact of non-native species migrating from reservoirs on native assemblages in their tributaries should be considered from a long-term perspective. The present study focused on asp (Leuciscus aspius), an artificially introduced piscivorous cyprinid that became established in the Lipno Reservoir (Czech Republic). Asp regularly occur in a tributary, the Vltava River, where twenty-five individuals were captured, radio-tagged, and tracked for five consecutive years. Asp occurrence in the tributary was highest during spring due to the upstream migration of spawning fish, and this was interconnected with a movement activity peak in March when the temperature reached 6 °C. The fish migrated a maximum distance of 31 km, and the probability of asp occurrence in the tributary was sex-dependent, with more females than males. Some individuals occupied the Vltava River not only for spawning but remained until the temperatures dropped below 10 °C. This study shows how non-native predators use reservoirs for wintering but feed and spawn in tributaries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Species Introduction on Aquatic Communities)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Nonnative Fishes on Commercial Seine Fisheries: Evidence from a Long-Term Data Set
Water 2019, 11(6), 1165; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11061165 - 04 Jun 2019
Abstract
Dozens of introduced exotic freshwater fish species inhabit the state of Florida. These nonnative fishes interact with freshwater commercial fisheries in a variety of ways, influencing catch abundance, composition, and revenue. Using a 22-year data set collected from a commercial haul seine fishery, [...] Read more.
Dozens of introduced exotic freshwater fish species inhabit the state of Florida. These nonnative fishes interact with freshwater commercial fisheries in a variety of ways, influencing catch abundance, composition, and revenue. Using a 22-year data set collected from a commercial haul seine fishery, we aimed to explore the dynamics of yield and revenue in relation to nonnative fishes, with emphasis on the suckermouth armored catfishes (Pterygoplichthys spp.). Using profit index metrics and the inverse Simpson’s diversity index, we found that non-native tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) and brown hoplo (Hoplosternum littorale) provided economic benefits while suckermouth armored catfishes seemed to disrupt catch consistency and lower profit index values. To reduce the negative impacts of the suckermouth armored catfishes and subsequently exert pressure on their population, we suggest marketing these edible fishes for human and/or animal consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Species Introduction on Aquatic Communities)
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Open AccessArticle
Behavioral Interactions and Trophic Overlap between Invasive Signal Crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus (Decapoda, Astacidae) and Native Fishes in Iberian Rivers
Water 2019, 11(3), 459; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11030459 - 05 Mar 2019
Abstract
The signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus Dana, 1852 is a successful invasive species in the Iberian Peninsula. This is of particular conservation concern, as fish fauna is highly endemic and also threatened within this ecoregion. The aim of this study was to analyze behavioral [...] Read more.
The signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus Dana, 1852 is a successful invasive species in the Iberian Peninsula. This is of particular conservation concern, as fish fauna is highly endemic and also threatened within this ecoregion. The aim of this study was to analyze behavioral interactions and trophic overlap between signal crayfish and native fishes in Iberian rivers (northern Spain). Video cameras were used to record fish “dominance/evasion” after spatial encounters with crayfish. Diet composition and isotopic signatures (δ13C and δ15N) were compared to evaluate the niche overlap. Fish were dominant in 25% of the encounters with juvenile crayfish, whereas this percentage was only 4% with adult crayfish. Observations showed a high fish “evasion” response for Pyrenean stone loach Barbatula quignardi (Bǎcescu-Meşter, 1967) (>30%). Dietary results showed a high trophic overlap between signal crayfish with the pelagic Pyrenean minnow Phoxinus bigerri Kottelat, 2007 and the benthic loach. However, the isotopic niche overlap was low, with brown trout Salmo trutta L., 1758 showing the highest area (only 0.1 ‰2). Overall, our findings suggest that interferences may occur with native species for food (i.e., benthic invertebrates). Consequently, measures should be applied to control invasive crayfish in Iberian rivers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Species Introduction on Aquatic Communities)
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