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Article

Variation in Diet Patterns of the Invasive Top Predator Sander lucioperca (Linnaeus, 1758) across Portuguese Basins

1
MARE, Centro de Ciências do Mar e do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
2
Escola Superior Agrária—Instituto Politécnico de Santarém, Quinta do Galinheiro—S. Pedro, 2001-904 Santarém, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Frédéric Santoul, Stéphanie Boulêtreau and Jan Kubečka
Water 2021, 13(15), 2053; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13152053
Received: 31 May 2021 / Revised: 13 July 2021 / Accepted: 24 July 2021 / Published: 28 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Species Introduction on Aquatic Communities)
The introduction of non-native species is recognized as a major threat to biodiversity, particularly in freshwater ecosystems. Pikeperch Sander lucioperca, is a recent invader to Portugal, primarily providing commercial and angling interest. The aim of this work was to study the diet of this top predator across Portuguese basins and to evaluate its potential impact on recipient ecosystems. In total, 256 pikeperch stomachs from seven basins were examined, of which 88 (n = 34%) were empty. Pikeperch diet was dominated by R. rutilus, M. salmoides and Diptera in northern populations, while A. alburnus, P. clarkii and Atyidae were important prey in more humid highlands. Variation in diet was most strongly linked to latitude and ontogeny, with both size classes showing signs of cannibalism. The population niche breadth remained low and was accompanied by higher individual diet specialization, particularly in northern populations. Pikeperch dietary patterns denoted an opportunistic ability to use locally abundant prey in each ecosystem, and was size dependent, with larger individuals becoming more piscivores, causing a higher impact in the lotic systems. This first perspective about the pikeperch diet presents a very broad view of the feeding traits of this non-native predator across Portugal, being very important to deepen our knowledge about the impact of these introduced piscivores. View Full-Text
Keywords: freshwaters; pikeperch; trophic ecology; diet specialization; non-native fish freshwaters; pikeperch; trophic ecology; diet specialization; non-native fish
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ribeiro, D.; Gkenas, C.; Gago, J.; Ribeiro, F. Variation in Diet Patterns of the Invasive Top Predator Sander lucioperca (Linnaeus, 1758) across Portuguese Basins. Water 2021, 13, 2053. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13152053

AMA Style

Ribeiro D, Gkenas C, Gago J, Ribeiro F. Variation in Diet Patterns of the Invasive Top Predator Sander lucioperca (Linnaeus, 1758) across Portuguese Basins. Water. 2021; 13(15):2053. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13152053

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ribeiro, Diogo, Christos Gkenas, João Gago, and Filipe Ribeiro. 2021. "Variation in Diet Patterns of the Invasive Top Predator Sander lucioperca (Linnaeus, 1758) across Portuguese Basins" Water 13, no. 15: 2053. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13152053

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