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Special Issue "Management of Water-Energy-Food Security Nexus"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water–Food–Energy Nexus".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Larry Swatuk

School of Environment, Enterprise, and Development, University of Waterloo
Website | E-Mail
Interests: enviromental and natural resource governance and management
Guest Editor
Dr. Corrine Cash

Coady International Institute, St. Francis Xavier University, Nova Scotia, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: climate change, sustainable development, cities

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Much has been written about the so-called WEF (water-energy-food) Nexus. The Nexus, particularly in an era of climate change, presents major opportunities and challenges in terms of environmental sustainability, social justice, economic prosperity, and political stability. Put differently, how water, energy, and food are managed has serious security implications for people and the planet. For this Special Issue, we invite papers examining the security implications and management challenges of the WEF Nexus, including issues related to indigenous and participatory governance, agricultural expansion, urbanization, shifts in transportation, and climate change, as well as unconventional fossil fuels and renewable energies. Questions to be considered include: How does a nexus perspective transform water-related rights and responsibilities? At what scales should water be managed from a nexus perspective? What management models and conflict resolution mechanisms are most effective? How may policy coherence be realized for greater sustainability and resilience? What are the effects of a securitization of the water-energy-food nexus? The articles of the Special Issue may include theoretical discussions and case studies concerning the management of the water-energy-food security nexus.

Prof. Larry Swatuk
Dr. Corrine Cash
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • WEF Nexus
  • security
  • resilience
  • sustainability
  • securitization
  • water conflict and cooperation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Water, Energy and Food Supply Security in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Countries—A Risk Perspective
Water 2019, 11(3), 455; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11030455
Received: 4 January 2019 / Revised: 11 February 2019 / Accepted: 27 February 2019 / Published: 4 March 2019
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1540 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Supply systems for water, energy and food in the Gulf region are becoming highly interlinked. In the last decades, interdependence was evident in the increase of coproduction plants and the cross-sectoral resource use footprints. In light of increasing integration due to growing scarcities, [...] Read more.
Supply systems for water, energy and food in the Gulf region are becoming highly interlinked. In the last decades, interdependence was evident in the increase of coproduction plants and the cross-sectoral resource use footprints. In light of increasing integration due to growing scarcities, the construction of mega projects for coproduction, and the use of renewables across sectors, the security notion can be revisited. This paper proposes a view of the resource supply security based on the systems’ characteristics under change and their ability to deal with risks and shocks (resilience). It introduces internal and external risk factors for the water, energy and food supply systems in the Gulf region and highlights recent knowledge on such risks. Further, the paper explains the vulnerability of supply systems to planning risks like scale, integration intensity and level of service provisions together with risks related to growth, technology, market and climate. In light of such insecurities, we stress the importance of investing in risk management and resilience policies in infrastructure planning. Response measures to future risks can focus on options like storage, knowledge, diversification and, importantly, promoting regional cooperation and synergies from common infrastructure planning between countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Water-Energy-Food Security Nexus)
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Open AccessReview
Prospects for Improving Irrigated Agriculture in Southern Africa: Linking Water, Energy and Food
Water 2018, 10(12), 1881; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10121881
Received: 14 November 2018 / Revised: 28 November 2018 / Accepted: 12 December 2018 / Published: 19 December 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1827 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Increasing agricultural productivity has always been a prominent feature on the regional agenda due to a high incidence of food and nutrition insecurity. This review assessed the current status of irrigated agriculture in southern Africa from a water–energy–food (WEF) nexus perspective. Gaps and [...] Read more.
Increasing agricultural productivity has always been a prominent feature on the regional agenda due to a high incidence of food and nutrition insecurity. This review assessed the current status of irrigated agriculture in southern Africa from a water–energy–food (WEF) nexus perspective. Gaps and opportunities for improving irrigated agriculture within the context of the WEF nexus were also assessed in terms of the feasible limits to which they can be exploited. Southern Africa faces water scarcity, and climate projections show that member states will face increased physical and/or economic water scarcity by as early as 2025, which will have negative impacts on water, energy and food production. Recurrent droughts experienced across the region reaffirm the sensitive issues of food and energy insecurity as well as water scarcity. Projections of an increasing population within the region indicate increased water, energy and food demand. With agriculture already accounting for about 70% of water withdrawals, increasing the area under irrigation will place additional demand on already strained energy grids and scarce water resources. This poses the question—is increasing irrigated agriculture a solution to improving water access, food security and energy supply? While there are prospects for increasing the area under irrigation and subsequent improvement in agricultural productivity, adopting a WEF nexus approach in doing so would mitigate trade-offs and unintended consequences. Consideration of the WEF nexus in integrated resources planning and management eliminates the possibilities of transferring problems from one sector to other, as it manages synergies and trade-offs. While it is acknowledged that improving water productivity in irrigated agriculture could reduce water and energy use while increasing yield output, there is a need to decide how such savings would then be reallocated. Any intervention to increase the irrigated area should be done in the context of a WEF nexus analytical framework to guide policy and decision-making. Technical planning should evolve around the WEF nexus approach in setting targets, as WEF nexus indicators would reveal the performance and impact of proposed interventions on any of the three WEF nexus components. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Water-Energy-Food Security Nexus)
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