Special Issue "Algae: Indices of Water and Ecological Quality"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Éva Ács
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Ecological Research, Danube Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary; National University of Public Service, Budapest, Hungary
Interests: phytobenthos; algae, taxonomy of diatoms; water qualification
Prof. Dr. Keve T. Kiss
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Ecological Research, Danube Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary
Interests: phytoplankton; algae; taxonomy of centric diatoms; relationship between the phytoplankton and the primary production in rivers
Dr. Krisztina Buczkó
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Ecological Research, Danube Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary
Interests: diatom-based palaeoecological reconstructions; palaeolimnology; diatom taxonomy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pollution of lakes and rivers has become a global problem that has reached crisis proportions in several regions. Water quality assessment, monitoring and the improvement of the methods requires the on-going, sustained efforts of experts. Eutrophication is still the most common water quality problem on Earth, but global warming presents new types of challenges for researchers. The main cause of water pollution is human activity, resulting in water that is not usable for certain purposes and even dangerous. To ensure, that all reasonable and practicable measures are taken to protect, restore and enhance the quality of water, a policy supporting the principle of ecologically sustainable development is needed. This Special Issue of Water will focus on ecological status assessment based on planktonic or benthic algae. We welcome any manuscript dealing with index developments, load-impact analysis, stressor dependent qualification, intercalibration results, effects of thermal water load or drying up of the ecological status of surface waters, and the spatial heterogeneity of lakes in connection with EQR.

The Guest Editor will also consider papers addressing planktonic and benthic algae and their application in the ecological status assessment of running or standing waters. This Special Issue is open to submissions from scientists based worldwide.

Prof. Dr. Éva Ács
Prof. Dr. Keve T. Kiss
Dr. Krisztina Buczkó
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • planktonic and benthic algae
  • running and standing water
  • ecological status assessment
  • stressors
  • water quality
  • indices
  • EQR

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Mesozooplankton Selective Feeding on Phytoplankton in a Semi-Enclosed Bay as Revealed by HPLC Pigment Analysis
Water 2020, 12(7), 2031; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12072031 - 17 Jul 2020
Abstract
Mesozooplankton have been known to be important consumers of phytoplankton, and the community plays an important role in removing the primary production in the marine ecosystem. In the present study, mesozooplankton grazing on phytoplankton were studied in situ at two sampling stations (TM4 [...] Read more.
Mesozooplankton have been known to be important consumers of phytoplankton, and the community plays an important role in removing the primary production in the marine ecosystem. In the present study, mesozooplankton grazing on phytoplankton were studied in situ at two sampling stations (TM4 and TM8) in Tolo Harbour. HPLC analysis showed that diatoms were the dominant phytoplankton in the two stations throughout the year, and contributed on average to over 40% of total phytoplankton biomass. Dinoflagellates were the second most abundant group of phytoplankton in the two monitoring stations, while the contribution of haptophytes, green algae, cyanobacteria, and cryptophytes was negligible. Feeding experiments, combined with HPLC pigment analysis, were conducted to measure mesozooplankton selective feeding on phytoplankton. The results demonstrated that mesozooplankton displayed a clear feeding selectivity for phytoplankton in Tolo Harbour. Firstly, mesozooplankton showed strong preference for the phytoplankton with the size of 20–200 μm, which suggested that the grazing selectivity and grazing rates of mesozooplankton were affected by the size of the food particles. On the other hand, mesozooplankton assemblages in Tolo Harbour displayed significant feeding selectivity for diatoms, dinoflagellates, and cryptophytes over other types of phytoplankton. The three algae groups are all the major phototrophic components in marine planktonic communities, and they often cause red tides in the marine environment. These results, taken together, suggested that mesozooplankton should play an important role in the regulation of red tides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Algae: Indices of Water and Ecological Quality)
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