Special Issue "Geochemistry of Water and Sediment III"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 February 2023 | Viewed by 1026

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stanislav Frančišković-Bilinski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Marine and Environmental Research, Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: environment science; water quality; geochemistry; water sediments; heavy metal
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Sanja Sakan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre of Excellence in Environmental Chemistry and Engineering – ICTM, University of Belgrade, Njegoševa 12, 11158 Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: environmental chemistry; heavy metals; waters; sediments; soils; pollution risk assessment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Access to drinking water is one of the largest problems of modern times, and water pollution is a growing problem worldwide. Increased concentrations of different toxic substances, especially heavy metals, affect biodiversity and are hazardous to human health. Sediment may act as a sink for a huge number of toxic substances and should therefore be investigated in addition to water, as it contains a record of the previous pollution. Geochemical investigations of aquatic sediments in freshwater and marine environments present excellent insights into the state of pollution of investigated water bodies and their ecosystems. The chemical composition of sediment is informative, both in investigations of mineral resources of a particular region for mining purposes and in tracing contamination from different sources (sewage, industry, agriculture, abandoned and active mines, landfills, harbors, oil drilling, etc.).

Pollution affects all sources of drinking water—ground, spring, river, and lake. The interaction of water and sediment is of special importance, as sediment can also release heavy metals and act as a source of pollution. Application and development of existing and new analytical methods are also very important aspects.

The purpose of this Special Issue, the third related to this theme, is to publish original, high-quality research papers, as well as review articles, addressing recent advances in water and aquatic sediment research, new methods and developments in monitoring, as well as legislative development.

Dr. Stanislav Frančišković-Bilinski
Dr. Sanja Sakan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water and sediment quality
  • geochemical composition
  • heavy metals
  • pollution
  • drinking water
  • analytical methods
  • monitoring
  • legislative development

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
A Paleolimnological Perspective on Arctic Mountain Lake Pollution
Water 2022, 14(24), 4044; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14244044 - 11 Dec 2022
Viewed by 704
Abstract
The chemical composition of sediments from the Arctic mountain Lake Bolshoy Vudjavr, situated in the western part of the Russian Arctic zone, was studied. The lake has been under intense anthropogenic load for more than 90 years since the development of the richest [...] Read more.
The chemical composition of sediments from the Arctic mountain Lake Bolshoy Vudjavr, situated in the western part of the Russian Arctic zone, was studied. The lake has been under intense anthropogenic load for more than 90 years since the development of the richest apatite–nepheline deposits in the world started. A 27 cm thick sediment core was sampled in the central part of the lake at the maximum depth of 37.4 m. The concentrations of more than 50 elements were analyzed by the mass spectral method, ICP-MS. The lake sedimentation rate established from the change in the content of the radioactive isotope 210Pb was 2.3 mm/yr. The effluent from apatite–nepheline production and atmospheric fallout enrich the sediments of Lake Bolshoy Vudjavr with alkali and alkaline earth metals, N, P, Mn, Fe, Al compounds, rare earth elements, and trace elements (Sb, Cu, Zn, Pb, Bi, Nb, Ta, Th). Analysis of the forms of elements in the lake sediments showed that the studied elements are mainly found in stable fractions—mineral, acid-soluble, and associated with organic matter. The pollution of the sediments of Lake Bolshoy Vudjavr was assessed by the integral index PLI (Pollution Load Index) and CF (contamination factor). The PLI value sharply increased after the “Apatite” Plant had been launched and a large amount of wastewater from the mines had been released into the lake. The highest PLI values were detected in the sediment layers accumulated during the period 1990s–2000s. Sb (18.2), P (10.3), Sr (7.8), and La (6.0) have the maximum CF values among all the studied elements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geochemistry of Water and Sediment III)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Author: Vladimir Dauvalter, Zakhar Slukovskii, Dmitry Denisov and Alina Guzeva

Affiliation: Institute of the North Industrial Ecology Problems, Kola Science Centre, Russain Academy of Sciences

Title: A Paleolimnological Perspective on an Arctic Mountain Lake Pollution by the Effluents of the Mining Industry

Abstract: The article presents the results of studies of the chemical composition of sediments taken from the Arctic mountain Lake Bolshoy Vudjavr, western part of the Russian Arctic zone, which has been under intense anthropogenic load for more than 90 years since the start of the development of the richest apatite-nepheline deposits in the world. A sediment core 27 cm thick was sampled in the central part of the lake at the maximum depth of 37.4 m. Analysis of the concentrations of more than 50 elements was carried out by the mass spectral method ICP-MS. The lake sedimentation rate was established from the change in the content of the radioactive isotope 210Pb to be 2.3 mm/yr. Effluent from apatite-nepheline production and atmospheric fallout enrich the sediments of Lake Bolshoy Vudjavr with alkali and alkaline earth metals, N, P, Mn, Fe, Al compounds, rare earth elements, and trace elements (Sb, Cu, Zn, Pb, Bi, Nb, Ta, Th). Elements in sediments are mainly found in hard-to-reach fractions – mineral, acid-soluble and organic. The pollution of the sediments of Lake Bolshoy Vudjavr was assessed by the integral index PLI (Pollution Load Index) and CF (contamination factor). A sharp increase in the PLI value occurs after the start of the activity of the “Apatite” Plant and the release of a large amount of wastewater from the mines into the lake. The highest PLI values were noted in sediment layers accumulated during period 1990s–2000s. Antimony (18.2), P (10.3), Sr (7.8), La (6.0) have the maximum CF values among all the studied elements.

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