Advances in Parvovirus Research 2024

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Viruses".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 3725

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Interests: parvovirus B19; virus–cell interactions; viral infections; recombinant viruses; virological diagnosis; antiviral strategies
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue on “Advances in Parvovirus Research 2024” continues the series dedicated to research on viruses belonging to the Parvoviridae family, following the successful Issues “New Insights into Parvovirus Research”, “Advances in Parvovirus Research 2020” and “Advances in Parvoviruses Research 2022”.

This Special Issue, in continuity with the previous Special Issue, offers a dedicated opportunity for presenting research results in the field of parvoviruses, aiming at expanding knowledge, providing new insights and addressing research on unresolved issues. Evolution, genomic diversity, structural biology, viral replication and virus–host interactions, pathogenesis and immunity, clinical virology of medical and veterinarian relevance, gene therapy, viral oncotherapy and novel antiviral strategies are all topics relevant to research in the field, which can be contributed to this Special Issue.

The Special Issue is associated with the conference “XIX International Parvovirus Workshop”, which will take place in Leuven, Belgium, on 3–6 September 2024. The international workshops dedicated to parvoviruses, first held in 1985, are biennial events centred on all aspects of parvovirus research that provide an opportunity to create networks and focus on the research topics in this field. For further information, visit the dedicated website: https://parvovirusworkshop2024.org.

Dr. Giorgio Gallinella
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • parvoviridae
  • parvovirus evolution
  • parvovirus structure
  • parvovirus genetics
  • parvovirus–host interactions
  • parvovirus pathogenesis and immunity
  • parvovirus oncolytic therapy
  • parvovirus viral vectors
  • antiviral strategies

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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10 pages, 2360 KiB  
Communication
T84 Monolayer Cell Cultures Support Productive HBoV and HSV-1 Replication and Enable In Vitro Co-Infection Studies
by Swen Soldwedel, Sabrina Demuth and Oliver Schildgen
Viruses 2024, 16(5), 773; https://doi.org/10.3390/v16050773 - 13 May 2024
Viewed by 271
Abstract
Based on several clinical observations it was hypothesized that herpesviruses may influence the replication of human bocaviruses, the second known parvoviruses that have been confirmed as human pathogens. While several cell lines support the growth of HSV-1, HBoV-1 was exclusively cultivated on air–liquid [...] Read more.
Based on several clinical observations it was hypothesized that herpesviruses may influence the replication of human bocaviruses, the second known parvoviruses that have been confirmed as human pathogens. While several cell lines support the growth of HSV-1, HBoV-1 was exclusively cultivated on air–liquid interface cultures, the latter being a rather complicated, slow, and low throughput system. One of the cell lines are T84 cells, which are derived from the lung metastasis of a colorectal tumor. In this study, we provide evidence that T84 also supports HBoV replication when cultivated as monolayers, while simultaneously being permissive for HSV-1. The cell culture model thus would enable co-infection studies of both viruses and is worth being optimized for high throughput studies with HBoV-1. Additionally, the study provides evidence for a supporting effect of HSV-1 on the replication and packaging of HBoV-1 progeny DNA into DNase-resistant viral particles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Parvovirus Research 2024)
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18 pages, 2036 KiB  
Article
Seroepidemiology of Human Parvovirus B19 Infection among the Population of Vojvodina, Serbia, over a 16-Year Period (2008–2023)
by Vladimir Vuković, Aleksandra Patić, Mioljub Ristić, Gordana Kovačević, Ivana Hrnjaković Cvjetković and Vladimir Petrović
Viruses 2024, 16(2), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/v16020180 - 25 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 968
Abstract
This study aimed to estimate the serological status and dynamic changes in the prevalence of Parvovirus B19 (PVB19) antibodies within the general population residing in the northern part of the Republic of Serbia (Province of Vojvodina) during a 16-year period. Serum samples were [...] Read more.
This study aimed to estimate the serological status and dynamic changes in the prevalence of Parvovirus B19 (PVB19) antibodies within the general population residing in the northern part of the Republic of Serbia (Province of Vojvodina) during a 16-year period. Serum samples were analyzed for Human PVB19-specific IgM and IgG antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Throughout the study period, the overall seroprevalence was 49.51%. Approximately 10% of patients exhibited a serologic profile positive for PVB19 IgM antibodies. Notably, seroprevalence varied significantly, ranging from 9.12% in the pediatric cohort (ages 1–4 years) to 65.50% in the adult demographic (40–59 years old). Seroprevalence was higher (51.88%) among women compared to men (42.50%). Immunologically naive pregnant women in the age groups 26–36 and 36–45 years had 45% (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.31–1.00) and 52% (OR = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.24–0.94) lower odds of having negative IgM and IgG compared to those in age group 16–25 years old. Improved knowledge of the epidemiology of PVB19 may assist clinicians in the differential diagnosis of PVB19 clinical manifestations. The PVB19 detection is particularly important for monitoring individuals in risk groups such as women of reproductive age, medical staff, patients with hematological disorders, and those with immunodeficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Parvovirus Research 2024)
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13 pages, 1027 KiB  
Article
Molecular Survey on Porcine Parvoviruses (PPV1-7) and Their Association with Major Pathogens in Reproductive Failure Outbreaks in Northern Italy
by Giulia Faustini, Claudia Maria Tucciarone, Giovanni Franzo, Anna Donneschi, Maria Beatrice Boniotti, Giovanni Loris Alborali and Michele Drigo
Viruses 2024, 16(1), 157; https://doi.org/10.3390/v16010157 - 21 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 857
Abstract
Successful reproductive performance is key to farm competitiveness in the global marketplace. Porcine parvovirus 1 (PPV1) has been identified as a major cause of reproductive failure, and since 2001 new species of porcine parvoviruses, namely PPV2–7, have been identified, although their role is [...] Read more.
Successful reproductive performance is key to farm competitiveness in the global marketplace. Porcine parvovirus 1 (PPV1) has been identified as a major cause of reproductive failure, and since 2001 new species of porcine parvoviruses, namely PPV2–7, have been identified, although their role is not yet fully understood yet. The present study aimed to investigate PPVs’ presence in reproductive failure outbreaks occurring in 124 farms of northern Italy. Fetuses were collected from 338 sows between 2019 and 2021 and tested for PPVs by real-time PCR-based assays and for other viruses responsible for reproductive disease. At least one PPV species was detected in 59.7% (74/124) of the tested farms. In order, PPV1, PPV5, PPV6, PPV7 and PPV4 were the most frequently detected species, whereas fewer detections were registered for PPV2 and PPV3. Overall, the new PPV2–7 species were detected in 26.6% (90/338) of the cases, both alone or in co-infections: PCV-2 (7.1%, 24/338), PCV-3 (8.2%, 28/338), and PRRSV-1 (6.2%, 21/338) were frequently identified in association with PPVs. Single PPVs detections or co-infections with other agents commonly responsible for reproductive failure should encourage future studies investigating their biological, clinical, and epidemiological role, for a better preparedness for potential emerging challenges in intensive pig production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Parvovirus Research 2024)
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9 pages, 1702 KiB  
Brief Report
Parvovirus B19 Outbreak in Israel: Retrospective Molecular Analysis from 2010 to 2023
by Orna Mor, Marina Wax, Shoshana-Shani Arami, Maya Yitzhaki, Or Kriger, Oran Erster and Neta S. Zuckerman
Viruses 2024, 16(3), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/v16030480 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 833
Abstract
This study presents an analysis of the epidemiological trends of parvovirus B19 (B19V) in Israel from 2010 to 2023, with particular emphasis on the outbreak in 2023. The analysis utilized molecular diagnostic data from individual patients obtained at the Central Virology Laboratory. Between [...] Read more.
This study presents an analysis of the epidemiological trends of parvovirus B19 (B19V) in Israel from 2010 to 2023, with particular emphasis on the outbreak in 2023. The analysis utilized molecular diagnostic data from individual patients obtained at the Central Virology Laboratory. Between 2010 and 2022, 8.5% of PCR-tested samples were positive for B19V, whereas in 2023, this percentage surged to 31% of PCR-tested samples. Throughout the study period, annual cycles consistently peaked in early spring/summer, with the most recent prominent outbreak occurring in 2016. Predominantly, diagnoses were made in children and women aged 20–39. Despite the notable surge in 2023, over 80% of positive cases continued to be observed in children and young women, with a decrease in cases during winter months. Furthermore, genotype 1a of the virus remained the predominant strain circulating during the outbreak. In light of these circumstances, consideration should be given to implementing screening measures, particularly among high-risk groups such as pregnant women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Parvovirus Research 2024)
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