Special Issue "Adenovirus Pathogenesis"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Viruses".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Annasara Lenman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Section of Virology, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, SE-90185 Umeå, Sweden; Institute for Experimental Virology, TWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, a joint venture between the Medical School Hannover and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover, Germany
Interests: virus–host interactions, gastrointestinal viruses
Prof. Dr. Niklas Arnberg
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Section of Virology, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, SE-90185 Umeå, Sweden
Interests: Virus–host cell interactions: implications for tropism, treatment, and targeting

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Adenoviruses constitute a common cause of disease in humans, which includes infection in airways, gut, eyes, but also in lymphoid tissue, urinary tract, and liver. Adenovirus infections can be both acute and persistent, and the latter are a common cause of death in immunocompromised patients. There are no approved drugs against this pathogen, implying that studies to better understand its basic biology and pathogenesis are urgently needed. In this Special Issue, we would like to address the molecular and cellular mechanisms of adenovirus infection and pathogenesis. This includes the molecular determinants of cell and tissue tropism, life cycle, transmission in the host, mechanisms of cell death and tissue damage, as well as modulation and evasion of the host’s immune defense. We welcome all paper formats, including short and regular original articles and reviews. For participants of the 14th International Adenovirus Meeting in Spain (https://iam2020.atlantacongress.org/), a 10% discount on Article Processing Charges will be applied.

Dr. Annasara Lenman
Prof. Dr. Niklas Arnberg
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Human adenovirus
  • Viral pathogenesis
  • Virus–host interactions
  • Immune defense
  • Life cycle
  • Replication
  • Tropism
  • Persistence
  • Antiviral targets

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Open AccessReview
Intestinal HAdV Infection: Tissue Specificity, Persistence, and Implications for Antiviral Therapy
Viruses 2019, 11(9), 804; https://doi.org/10.3390/v11090804 - 30 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Human adenovirus (HAdV) causes infections predominantly in early childhood and the tissue tropism of specific HAdV species determines the clinical manifestation, including infections of the gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tract, and keratoconjunctivitis. Why HAdV shows such a tropism has not yet been fully elucidated, [...] Read more.
Human adenovirus (HAdV) causes infections predominantly in early childhood and the tissue tropism of specific HAdV species determines the clinical manifestation, including infections of the gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tract, and keratoconjunctivitis. Why HAdV shows such a tropism has not yet been fully elucidated, but in the intestine different mechanisms for virus entry or resistence to immune modulatory factors have been described. Recently identified antiviral strategies by interferons provide evidence about the repression of E1A and maybe even promote HAdV persistence. The presence of HAdV in a persistent status in the gut is of importance in the setting of pediatric stem cell transplant recipients where HAdV detection in stool usually preceds clinical signs and severe infections are related to mortality. The reactivation of persistent intestinal HAdV infections in these patients needs further investigation also with regard to successful therapy options. In addition, several newly identified recombinant HAdV types have been isolated from stool samples, thus raising the question of possible recombination events in the gut. In this review, intestinal HAdV infections are discussed in relation to the tissue tropism, persistence, recombination, and new in-vitro models to enhance the knowledge about virus–host interactions and support the development of new treatment approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adenovirus Pathogenesis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop