New Insights in Cancer Therapy and COVID Vaccination for Cancer Patients

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2022) | Viewed by 7491

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Oncology, Avicenne Hospital, Assisatnece Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, F-93000 BOBIGNY, France
Interests: immunotherapy; lung cancer; cancer vaccines; breast cancer; supportive care in oncology

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Medical Thoracic and Medical Oncology, AP-HP, Avicenne University Hospital, 93000 Bobigny, France
2. Inserm UMR 1272 “Hypoxie et Poumon”, UFR SMBH Léonard de Vinci, Université Sorbonne Paris Nord, 93000 Bobigny, France
Interests: antitumoral immunotherapy; circulating biomarker; thoracic oncology; cancer and lung fibrosis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,     

Cancer immunotherapy has gained considerable popularity and momentum in recent years. Cancer vaccines, consisting of preventive and therapeutic vaccines, work by inducing or augmenting the immune response to enhance the immune system’s ability to fight cancer. Cancer vaccines are one of the main pillars of the cancer immunotherapy even in the era of checkpoint inhibitors. Indeed, although the latter have completely changed the scenario of cancer treatment, several types of patients do not benefit from them. However, the cancer vaccine field is still a work in progress because an effective strategy has not yet been developed.   

In addition, Covid vaccination in cancer patients is getting a lot of attention in the academic community. Some scholars think that cancer patients should be prioritized to receive the vaccine.     

The topic of the Special Issue will cover cancer vaccine research, cancer immunotherapy research, and Covid vaccination research in cancer patients.

Prof. Laurent Zelek
Dr. Boris Duchemann
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • cancer vaccines
  • cancer immunotherapy
  • Covid vaccination

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 1744 KiB  
Article
Systemic COVID-19 Vaccination Enhances the Humoral Immune Response after SARS-CoV-2 Infection: A Population Study from a Hospital in Poland Criteria for COVID-19 Reimmunization Are Needed
by Piotr Kosiorek, Dorota Elżbieta Kazberuk, Anna Hryniewicz, Robert Milewski, Samuel Stróż and Anna Stasiak-Barmuta
Vaccines 2022, 10(2), 334; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10020334 - 19 Feb 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2566
Abstract
Systemic vaccination with the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine stimulates the humoral response. Our study aimed to compare the intensity of the humoral immune response, measured by SARS-CoV-2 IgG, SARS-CoV-2 IgM, and S-RBD-neutralizing IgG antibody levels after COVID-19 vaccination versus after SARS-CoV-2 infection. We analyzed [...] Read more.
Systemic vaccination with the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine stimulates the humoral response. Our study aimed to compare the intensity of the humoral immune response, measured by SARS-CoV-2 IgG, SARS-CoV-2 IgM, and S-RBD-neutralizing IgG antibody levels after COVID-19 vaccination versus after SARS-CoV-2 infection. We analyzed 1060 people in the following groups: convalescents; healthy unvaccinated individuals; individuals vaccinated with Comirnaty, AstraZeneca, Moderna, or Johnson & Johnson; and vaccinated SARS-CoV-2 convalescents. The concentrations of SARS-CoV-2 IgG, SARS-CoV-2 IgM, and S-RBD-neutralizing antibodies were estimated in an oncology hospital laboratory by chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA; MAGLUMI). Results: (1) We observed a rise in antibody response in both the SARS-CoV-2 convalescent and COVID-19-vaccinated groups. (2) The levels of all antibody concentrations in vaccinated COVID-19 convalescents were significantly higher. (3) We differentiated asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 convalescents from the control group. Our analysis suggests that monitoring SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody concentrations is essential as an indicator of asymptomatic COVID-19 and as a measure of the effectiveness of the humoral response in convalescents and vaccinated people. Considering the time-limited effects of post-SARS-CoV-2 infection recovery or vaccination and the physiological half-life, among other factors, we suggest monitoring IgG antibody levels as a criterion for future vaccination. Full article
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Review
Vaccine Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
by Miguel García-Pardo, Teresa Gorria, Ines Malenica, Stéphanie Corgnac, Cristina Teixidó and Laura Mezquita
Vaccines 2022, 10(5), 740; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10050740 - 9 May 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4197
Abstract
Immunotherapy using immune checkpoint modulators has revolutionized the oncology field, emerging as a new standard of care for multiple indications, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, prognosis for patients with lung cancer is still poor. Although immunotherapy is highly effective in some [...] Read more.
Immunotherapy using immune checkpoint modulators has revolutionized the oncology field, emerging as a new standard of care for multiple indications, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, prognosis for patients with lung cancer is still poor. Although immunotherapy is highly effective in some cases, not all patients experience significant or durable responses, and further strategies are needed to improve outcomes. Therapeutic cancer vaccines are designed to exploit the body’s immune system to activate long-lasting memory against tumor cells that ensure tumor regression, with minimal toxicity. A unique feature of cancer vaccines lies in their complementary approach to boost antitumor immunity that could potentially act synergistically with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs). However, single-line immunization against tumor epitopes with vaccine-based therapeutics has been disappointingly unsuccessful, to date, in lung cancer. The high level of success of several recent vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 has highlighted the evolving advances in science and technology in the vaccines field, raising hope that this strategy can be successfully applied to cancer treatments. In this review, we describe the biology behind the cancer vaccines, and discuss current evidence for the different types of therapeutic cancer vaccines in NSCLC, including their mechanisms of action, current clinical development, and future strategies. Full article
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