HPV Vaccination: Current Situation and Future Goals

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 13233

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Medicine, Nazarbayev University, Astana, Kazakhstan
Interests: HPV epidemiology; HPV vaccination; cervical cancer screening; cervical cancer prevention

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Guest Editor
Basic Sciences Department, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Tuoro University Nevada, Henderson, NV, USA
Interests: HPV-related topics including diagnostics and prevention of cervical and other HPV-associated cancers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

More than 40 years have passed since in the 1980s Harald Zur Hausen, a German virologist, isolated Human papillomavirus (HPV) strains from cervical cancer tissue. His studies confirmed the theory that HPV is linked to cervical cancer development and acts as one of the main causative agents. In 1986 Zur Hausen proposed the idea of the HPV vaccine as a cancer prevention method. After years of experiments, the knowledge that persistent high-risk HPV infection is causally associated with cervical cancer has resulted in the development of prophylactic vaccines to prevent HPV infection. The first HPV vaccine was developed at the University of Queensland in Australia by Professors Ian Frazer and Jian Zhou. The vaccine was approved in 2006-2007 in more than 80 countries worldwide. HPV vaccines are currently among the most effective prophylactic vaccines ever created and made available, and proven to be effective in reducing HPV-related diseases rates. HPV vaccination programs have been developed and successfully implemented in many high-income countries and have led to a decline in cervical cancer incidence rates. However, the situation in low-income countries remains deplorable – HPV-related cancers still display a high incidence, including cervical cancer, which remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in women of the developing world. Although the HPV vaccination is successfully implemented in many countries worldwide, there are still multiple issues related to its dissemination and acceptance. HPV vaccination access, coverage, attitudes, and acceptance are not the same in different parts of the world.

Thus, to achieve a more extensive understanding of current scientific knowledge and trends in HPV vaccines implementation, this Special Issue is focused on the recent updates in this field. Based on your extensive knowledge and experience, we invite you to contribute with an original report, original observation, or review, to highlight the current situation related to (i) HPV vaccination coverage, (ii) attitudes towards HPV vaccination, (iii) HPV vaccination knowledge and awareness, (iv) HPV vaccines acceptance,  (v) factors associated with the implementation of  HPV vaccination programs locally and worldwide, (vi) effective instruments/interventions to improve the HPV vaccination public acceptance, (vii)  impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HPV vaccination.

Dr. Gulzhanat Aimagambetova
Dr. Azliyati Azizan
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • HPV infection
  • HPV vaccination
  • HPV prevention
  • cervical cancer prevention
  • HPV vaccine acceptance

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 191 KiB  
Editorial
Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: Past, Present and Future
by Gulzhanat Aimagambetova and Azliyati Azizan
Vaccines 2022, 10(9), 1398; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10091398 - 26 Aug 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1430
Abstract
The link between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and different diseases has been well-established since more than four decades ago [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue HPV Vaccination: Current Situation and Future Goals)

Research

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12 pages, 212 KiB  
Article
Determinants of Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Acceptance among Caregivers in Nigeria: A Fogg Behavior Model-Based Approach
by Sohail Agha, Drew Bernard, Sarah Francis, Aslam Fareed and Ifeanyi Nsofor
Vaccines 2024, 12(1), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines12010084 - 13 Jan 2024
Viewed by 2000
Abstract
Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake among adolescent girls is critical to reducing the burden of HPV-related cancers in Nigeria. This study assesses the factors influencing caregivers’ acceptance of HPV vaccination for their charges, using the Fogg Behavior Model (FBM) as a theoretical framework. [...] Read more.
Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake among adolescent girls is critical to reducing the burden of HPV-related cancers in Nigeria. This study assesses the factors influencing caregivers’ acceptance of HPV vaccination for their charges, using the Fogg Behavior Model (FBM) as a theoretical framework. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 1429 caregivers of girls aged 9–17 in six Nigerian states, using a survey instrument based on the FBM. Participants were recruited via Facebook and Instagram advertisements and interviewed through Facebook Messenger in August and September 2023. The study received ethical clearance from Nigeria’s National Health Research Ethics Committee. We applied bivariate and multivariate analyses to assess the relationships between the caregiver’s perception of how likely their adolescent girl was to get vaccinated in the next 12 months and motivation, ability, social factors (such as discussions with family and friends), injunctive norms, previous COVID-19 vaccination, and respondents’ sociodemographic characteristics. Adjusted odds ratios derived from logistic regression analyses revealed that caregivers’ motivation and ability, as well as social factors, were significantly associated with their perception that the adolescent girl in their care would get vaccinated within the next 12 months. Our findings suggest that behavioral interventions tailored to enhance motivation, ability, and social support among caregivers could significantly increase HPV vaccine uptake among adolescent girls in Nigeria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue HPV Vaccination: Current Situation and Future Goals)
13 pages, 281 KiB  
Article
Formative Research on HPV Vaccine Acceptance among Health Workers, Teachers, Parents, and Social Influencers in Uzbekistan
by Sahil Khan Warsi, Siff Malue Nielsen, Barbara A. K. Franklin, Shukhrat Abdullaev, Dilfuza Ruzmetova, Ravshan Raimjanov, Khalida Nagiyeva and Kamola Safaeva
Vaccines 2023, 11(4), 754; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11040754 - 29 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2005
Abstract
Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines effectively prevent cervical cancer, most of which results from undetected long-term HPV infection. HPV vaccine introduction is particularly sensitive and complicated given widespread misinformation and vaccination of young girls before their sexual debut. Research has examined HPV vaccine introduction [...] Read more.
Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines effectively prevent cervical cancer, most of which results from undetected long-term HPV infection. HPV vaccine introduction is particularly sensitive and complicated given widespread misinformation and vaccination of young girls before their sexual debut. Research has examined HPV vaccine introduction in lower- and middle-income countries (LMICs), but almost no studies attend to HPV vaccine attitudes in central Asian countries. This article describes the results of a qualitative formative research study to develop an HPV vaccine introduction communication plan in Uzbekistan. Data collection and analysis were designed using the Capability, Opportunity, and Motivation for Behaviour change (COM-B) mode for understanding health behaviours. This research was carried out with health workers, parents, grandparents, teachers, and other social influencers in urban, semi-urban, and rural sites. Information was collected using focus group discussions (FGDs) and semi-structured in-depth interviews (IDIs), and data in the form of participants’ words, statements, and ideas were thematically analysed to identify COM-B barriers and drivers for each target group’s HPV vaccine-related behaviour. Represented through exemplary quotations, findings were used to inform the development of the HPV vaccine introduction communication plan. Capability findings indicated that participants understood cervical cancer was a national health issue, but HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge was limited among non-health professionals, some nurses, and rural health workers. Results on an opportunity for accepting the HPV vaccine showed most participants would do so if they had access to credible information on vaccine safety and evidence. Regarding motivation, all participant groups voiced concern about the potential effects on young girls’ future fertility. Echoing global research, the study results highlighted that trust in health workers and the government as health-related information sources and collaboration among schools, municipalities, and polyclinics could support potential vaccine acceptance and uptake. Resource constraints precluded including vaccine target-aged girls in research and additional field sites. Participants represented diverse social and economic backgrounds reflective of the country context, and the communication plan developed using research insights contributed to the Ministry of Health (MoH) of the Republic of Uzbekistan HPV vaccine introduction efforts that saw high first dose uptake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue HPV Vaccination: Current Situation and Future Goals)
13 pages, 389 KiB  
Article
Low Uptake of the Second Dose of Human Papillomavirus Vaccine in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
by Nchang’wa Nhumba and Bruno Sunguya
Vaccines 2022, 10(11), 1919; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10111919 - 13 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2012
Abstract
Cervical cancer represents the most common neoplastic pathology among women, with a high burden of morbidity and mortality globally. Tanzania is no exception. The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine remains the most effective intervention to address such a burden. However, the uptake of the [...] Read more.
Cervical cancer represents the most common neoplastic pathology among women, with a high burden of morbidity and mortality globally. Tanzania is no exception. The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine remains the most effective intervention to address such a burden. However, the uptake of the second dose to confer full immunity remains a challenge. This study aimed to assess the uptake and factors associated with the second dose of the HPV (HPV-2) vaccine uptake among adolescents in the Ilala municipality of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Using a quantitative cross-sectional study, data of 389 adolescent girls was collected using a self-administered structured questionnaire. Analyses were conducted using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software through descriptive and multivariate logistic regression methods to determine uptake, characteristics, and factors associated with the uptake of the second dose of the HPV vaccine. Among the 389 adolescents, the uptake of the HPV-2 vaccine dose was only 21.3%, a lower level compared with the first dose of HPV vaccine (35.2%). Factors associated with the uptake of the HPV-2 vaccine were age (AOR 0.14, p = 0.008), positive attitude towards the HPV-2 vaccine (AOR 2.04, p = 0.023), and awareness of the HPV-2 vaccine (AOR: 9.16, p = 0.003). In conclusion, only one in five adolescents in the Ilala municipality received a second dose of HPV vaccine. Such low uptake was associated with attitude towards the HPV vaccine and low awareness of HPV-2 vaccines. Regular community sensitization and awareness campaigns by relevant authorities and implementers may help to increase the HPV vaccine uptake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue HPV Vaccination: Current Situation and Future Goals)
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Review

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21 pages, 1062 KiB  
Review
Prophylactic Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: From the Origin to the Current State
by Ayazhan Akhatova, Azliyati Azizan, Kuralay Atageldiyeva, Aiymkul Ashimkhanova, Aizada Marat, Yerbolat Iztleuov, Assem Suleimenova, Saikal Shamkeeva and Gulzhanat Aimagambetova
Vaccines 2022, 10(11), 1912; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10111912 - 11 Nov 2022
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 4253
Abstract
Immunization is the most successful method in preventing and controlling infectious diseases, which has helped saving millions of lives worldwide. The discovery of the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection being associated with a variety of benign conditions and cancers has driven the development of [...] Read more.
Immunization is the most successful method in preventing and controlling infectious diseases, which has helped saving millions of lives worldwide. The discovery of the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection being associated with a variety of benign conditions and cancers has driven the development of prophylactic HPV vaccines. Currently, four HPV vaccines are available on the pharmaceutical market: Cervarix, Gardasil, Gardasil-9, and the recently developed Cecolin. Multiple studies have proven the HPV vaccines’ safety and efficacy in preventing HPV-related diseases. Since 2006, when the first HPV vaccine was approved, more than 100 World Health Organization member countries reported the implementation of HPV immunization. However, HPV vaccination dread, concerns about its safety, and associated adverse outcomes have a significant impact on the HPV vaccine implementation campaigns all over the world. Many developed countries have successfully implemented HPV immunization and achieved tremendous progress in preventing HPV-related conditions. However, there are still many countries worldwide which have not created, or have not yet implemented, HPV vaccination campaigns, or have failed due to deficient realization plans associated with establishing successful HPV vaccination programs. Lack of proper HPV information campaigns, negative media reflection, and numerous myths and fake information have led to HPV vaccine rejection in many states. Thus, context-specific health educational interventions on HPV vaccination safety, effectiveness, and benefits are important to increase the vaccines’ acceptance for efficacious prevention of HPV-associated conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue HPV Vaccination: Current Situation and Future Goals)
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