Special Issue "Sharing Cities Shaping Cities"

A special issue of Urban Science (ISSN 2413-8851).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 October 2018).

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Giuseppe Salvia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architecture and Urban Studies, Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy
Interests: design theory and methods; sustainable consumption and production; social practice theory; socio-technical transformations; sharing economy; collaborative consumption; DIY; repair
Dr. Eugenio Morello
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architecture and Urban Studies, Polytechnic of Milan, Milano, Italy
Tel. +39 347 7709889; Fax: +39 02 2399 5435
Interests: urban simulation; spatial analysis; climate urban design; energy and urban planning
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Andrea Arcidiacono
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architecture and Urban Studies, Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy
Interests: urban planning and design; urban projects assessment; landscape planning; open spaces planning and design; green infrastructures design, ecosystem services analysis and policies for ‘Land take’ limitation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The sharing economy and collaborative consumption are attracting a great deal of interest due to their business, legal and civic implications. The consequences of the spreading of sharing-based practices in urban environments and under daily dynamics are underexplored.

This Special Issue aims to address if and how sharing shapes cities, the way that spaces are designed and lived in if social interactions are escalated, and the ways that habits and routines take place in post-individualistic society.

In particular, the following key questions are of primary interest:

  • Urban fabric: How is ‘sharing’ shaping cities? Does it represent a paradigm shift with tangible and physical reverberations on urban form? How are shared mobility, work, inhabiting, energy, and food provisions reconfiguring the urban and social fabric?
  • Social practices: Are new lifestyles and practices related to sharing changing the use and design of spaces? To what extent is sharing triggering a production and consumption paradigm shift to be reflected in urban arrangements and infrastructures?
  • Sustainability: Does sharing increase the intensity of use of space and assets, or, rather, does it increase them to meet the expectations of convenience for urban lifestyles? To what extent are these phenomena fostering more economically-, socially-, and environmentally-sustainable practices and cities?
  • Policy: How can policy makers and municipalities interact with these bottom-up and phenomena and grassroots innovation to create more sustainable cities?

We invite contributions to respond to the above questions from the fields of urban studies, urban planning and design, service design, sociology, geography, anthropology, innovation studies, and related, theoretically-grounded and informed by the results of fieldwork activities.

Dr. Giuseppe Salvia
Prof. Eugenio Morello
Prof. Andrea Arcidiacono
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Urban Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sharing economy
  • urban studies
  • collaborative consumption
  • P2P and commons
  • smart cities
  • urban fabric
  • sustainable consumption
  • policy innovation
  • social innovation
  • spatial planning

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Sharing Cities Shaping Cities
Urban Sci. 2019, 3(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci3010023 - 22 Feb 2019
Abstract
In recent years, ‘sharing cities’ has spread globally, starting in 2012 when Seoul declared its intent to pursue sharing economy strategies [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sharing Cities Shaping Cities) Printed Edition available

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle
Coworking Spaces and New Social Relations: A Focus on the Social Streets in Italy
Urban Sci. 2019, 3(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci3010002 - 24 Dec 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
The late 2000s witnessed a wide diffusion of innovative workplaces, named coworking spaces, designed to host creative people and entrepreneurs: the coworkers. Sharing the same space may provide a collaborative community to those kinds of workers who otherwise would not enjoy the relational [...] Read more.
The late 2000s witnessed a wide diffusion of innovative workplaces, named coworking spaces, designed to host creative people and entrepreneurs: the coworkers. Sharing the same space may provide a collaborative community to those kinds of workers who otherwise would not enjoy the relational component associated with a traditional corporate office. Coworking spaces can bring several benefits to freelancers and independent workers, such as knowledge transfer, informal exchange, cooperation, and forms of horizontal interaction with others, as well as business opportunities. Moreover, additional effects may concern the urban context: from community building, with the subsequent creation of social streets, and the improvement of the surrounding public space, to a wider urban revitalization, both from an economic and spatial point of view. These “indirect” effects are neglected by the literature, which mainly focuses on the positive impact on the workers’ performance. The present paper aimed to fill the gap in the literature by exploring the effects of coworking spaces in Italy on the local context, devoting particular attention to the relation with social streets. To reach this goal, the answers (236) to an on-line questionnaire addressed to coworkers were analysed. The results showed that three quarters of the coworkers reported a positive impact of coworking on the urban and local context, where 10 out of 100 coworking spaces developed and/or participated in social streets located in Italian cities, but also in the suburban and peripheral areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sharing Cities Shaping Cities) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
Engaging the Senses: The Potential of Emotional Data for Participation in Urban Planning
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(4), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2040098 - 21 Sep 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
This paper presents an exploratory study on the potential for sharing urban data; one where citizens create their own data and use it to understand and influence urban planning decisions. The aim of the study is to explore new models of participation through [...] Read more.
This paper presents an exploratory study on the potential for sharing urban data; one where citizens create their own data and use it to understand and influence urban planning decisions. The aim of the study is to explore new models of participation through the sharing of emotional data and focuses on the relationship between the physical space and emotions through identifying the links between stress levels and specific features of the urban environment. It addresses the problem in urban planning that, while people’s emotional connection with the physical urban setting is often valued, it is rarely recognised or used as a source of data to understand future decision making. The method involved participants using a (GSR) device linked to location data to measure participant’s emotional responses along a walking route in a city centre environment. Results show correlations between characteristics of the urban environment and stress levels, as well as how specific features of the city spaces create stress ‘peaks’. In the discussion we review how the data obtained could contribute to citizens creating their own information layer—an emotional layer—that could inform a shared approach to participation in urban planning decision-making. The future implications of the application of this method as an approach to public participation in urban planning are also considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sharing Cities Shaping Cities) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
Domesticity On-Demand: The Architectural and Urban Implications of Airbnb in Melbourne, Australia
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(3), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030088 - 12 Sep 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The home-sharing platform, Airbnb, is disrupting the social and spatial dynamics of cities. While there is a growing body of literature examining the effects of Airbnb on housing supply in first-world, urban environments, impacts on dwellings and dwelling typologies remain underexplored. This research [...] Read more.
The home-sharing platform, Airbnb, is disrupting the social and spatial dynamics of cities. While there is a growing body of literature examining the effects of Airbnb on housing supply in first-world, urban environments, impacts on dwellings and dwelling typologies remain underexplored. This research paper investigates the implications of “on-demand domesticity” in Australia’s second largest city, Melbourne, where the uptake of Airbnb has been enthusiastic, rapid, and unregulated. In contrast to Airbnb’s opportunistic use of existing housing stock in other global cities, the rise of short-term holiday rentals and the construction of new homes in Melbourne has been more symbiotic, perpetuating, and even driving housing models—with some confronting results. This paper highlights the challenges and opportunities that Airbnb presents for the domestic landscape of Melbourne, exposing loopholes and grey areas in the planning and building codes which have enabled peculiar domestic mutations to spring up in the city’s suburbs, catering exclusively to the sharing economy. Through an analysis of publically available spatial data, including GIS, architectural drawings, planning documents, and building and planning codes, this paper explores the spatial and ethical implications of this urban phenomenon. Ultimately arguing that the sharing economy may benefit from a spatial response if it presents a spatial problem, this paper proposes that strategic planning could assist in recalibrating and subverting the effects of global disruption in favor of local interests. Such a framework could limit the pernicious effects of Airbnb, while stimulating activity in areas in need of rejuvenation, representing a more nuanced, context-specific approach to policy and governance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sharing Cities Shaping Cities) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
Coworking, the Sharing Economy, and the City: Which Role for the ‘Coworking Entrepreneur’?
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(3), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030083 - 03 Sep 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Sharing economy platforms enabled by information and communication technologies (ICTs) are facilitating the diffusion of collaborative workplaces. Coworking spaces are emerging as a distinctive phenomenon in this context, not only fostering knowledge transfer and facilitating innovation, but also affecting the urban and socio-economic [...] Read more.
Sharing economy platforms enabled by information and communication technologies (ICTs) are facilitating the diffusion of collaborative workplaces. Coworking spaces are emerging as a distinctive phenomenon in this context, not only fostering knowledge transfer and facilitating innovation, but also affecting the urban and socio-economic fabric contributing to urban regeneration processes at both the local scale and the city scale. Although the positive impacts of coworking on the urban environment are documented, there is still little or no evidence of the economic viability of coworking businesses, and a “coworking bubble” has been evoked. Given the lack of data, a national survey was set up of Italian coworking businesses, aimed at assessing the relevance of internal organizational factors (size, occupancy, profitability, services provided) for the sustainability of coworking businesses. By presenting the results of the survey, we argue that the sustainability and viability of the coworking model is highly dependent on internal factors, strictly related to the entrepreneurial action of coworking managers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sharing Cities Shaping Cities) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
Sharing and Riding: How the Dockless Bike Sharing Scheme in China Shapes the City
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(3), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030068 - 09 Aug 2018
Cited by 7
Abstract
Over the last three years, the dockless bike sharing scheme has become prevalent in the context of the boom in the sharing economy, the wide use of mobile online payment, the increasing environmental awareness and the inherent market demand. This research takes Beijing [...] Read more.
Over the last three years, the dockless bike sharing scheme has become prevalent in the context of the boom in the sharing economy, the wide use of mobile online payment, the increasing environmental awareness and the inherent market demand. This research takes Beijing as a case study, investigates the users’ characteristics, their behaviour change, and perceptions of dockless bike sharing scheme by the quantitative survey, and then analyzes the reasons behind it and how it has changed the residents’ life in Beijing. This new kind of dockless shared bikes, with great advantages of accessibility, flexibility, efficiency and affordability, helps to solve the ‘last mile’ problem, reduce the travel time, and seems to be very environmentally-friendly and sustainable. However, with the help of interview and document analysis, this research finds that the shared bikes are not the effective alternative for the frequent car-users. Nevertheless, it also has numerous negative consequences such as ‘zombie’ bikes blocking the sidewalks and vandalism to the bikes. The public is also worried about their quality and safety, especially the issues of ‘right of way’. How to coordinate and solve these problems is not only related to the future direction of the dockless bike sharing scheme but also to the vital interests of the general public. Therefore, it is important to emphasize that governments, enterprises, and the public participate in multi-party cooperation and build synergic governance networks to carry forward the advantages and avoid the negative effects of the new bike sharing system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sharing Cities Shaping Cities) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
Spatial Agency: Creating New Opportunities for Sharing and Collaboration in Older People’s Cohousing
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(3), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030064 - 02 Aug 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Older people’s cohousing enables individuals to share spaces, resources, activities, and knowledge to expand their capability to act in society. Despite the diverse social, economic, and ethical aims that inform the creation of every cohousing community, there is often a disconnect between the [...] Read more.
Older people’s cohousing enables individuals to share spaces, resources, activities, and knowledge to expand their capability to act in society. Despite the diverse social, economic, and ethical aims that inform the creation of every cohousing community, there is often a disconnect between the social discourse developed by cohousing groups and the architectural spaces they create. This is a consequence of the building development process in cohousing, in which groups of older people are tasked with making decisions with considerable spatial implications prior to any collaboration with an architect. The concept of “spatial agency” offers an alternative model for the creation of cohousing, in which the expansion of architectural practice beyond aesthetic and technical building design enables social and spatial considerations to be explored contemporaneously. This study uses a two-year design-research collaboration with a cohousing group in Manchester, UK, to test the opportunities and constraints posed by a “spatial agency” approach to cohousing. The collaboration demonstrated how spatial agency enables both the architect and cohouser to act more creatively through a mutual sharing of knowledge, and, in doing so, tests new opportunities of sharing that are currently outside the cohousing orthodoxy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sharing Cities Shaping Cities) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
A Framework for Assessing Democratic Qualities in Collaborative Economy Platforms: Analysis of 10 Cases in Barcelona
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(3), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030061 - 25 Jul 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
The term “collaborative economy” or “collaborative economy platforms” refers to exchange, sharing, and collaboration in the consumption and production of capital and labor among distributed groups, supported by a digital platform. Collaborative economies’ use is growing rapidly and exponentially, creating high expectations of [...] Read more.
The term “collaborative economy” or “collaborative economy platforms” refers to exchange, sharing, and collaboration in the consumption and production of capital and labor among distributed groups, supported by a digital platform. Collaborative economies’ use is growing rapidly and exponentially, creating high expectations of sustainability and their potential to contribute to the democratization of the economy. However, collaborative economy platforms lack a holistic framework to assess their sustainability and pro-democratization qualities. In addition, there is confusion about platforms which present themselves as collaborative when they actually are not, and similar uncertainties and ambiguities are associated with diverse models. To address this confusion, this article provides a framework for assessing the pro-democratic qualities of collaborative economy initiatives. It was applied to 10 cases in the context of the city of Barcelona. The methods used in this study include mapping and typifying 10 collaborative economy cases in the city, structured and in-depth interviews, and a co-creation session. The results indicate the presence of several modalities for favoring democratic values in a collaborative economy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sharing Cities Shaping Cities) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
Producing Opportunities Together: Sharing-Based Policy Approaches for Marginal Mobilities in Bogotá
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(3), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030054 - 02 Jul 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
Everyday mobility practices are increasingly an element of interest for urban policy, as well as for suggesting alternative solutions to urban issues. Amongst their manifold contributions, practices can be relevant for securing individuals’ access to places and opportunities. They can do so by [...] Read more.
Everyday mobility practices are increasingly an element of interest for urban policy, as well as for suggesting alternative solutions to urban issues. Amongst their manifold contributions, practices can be relevant for securing individuals’ access to places and opportunities. They can do so by promoting services and behaviours based on resources that individuals may share between themselves. This role could be significant especially for those settings where the traditional provision of transport services and infrastructures is more difficult, such as in the informal settlements of the urban South. Drawing on these assumption, this paper intends to investigate policy solutions based on mobility practices, as a suitable way to enhance the access to urban opportunities from informal settlements. Policy approaches focused on mobility supply and demand are explored, addressing options such as the coproduction of mobility services and behavioural approaches based on demand matchmaking. A possible operationalization of such approaches is explored in the marginal informal neighbourhoods of Bogotá, considering their accessibility issues, how shared use mobility policies may tackle them, and what features are necessary for the implementation of such measures. The proposed policy measures emerge as suitable operational options that nonetheless require recognition and support by the institutions responsible for urban mobility planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sharing Cities Shaping Cities) Printed Edition available
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