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Special Issue "Contribution of Cytolethal Distending Toxin to Diseases Caused by Clinically-important Bacterial Pathogens"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Bacterial Toxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Joseph M. DiRienzo

Department of Microbiology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 215-898-8238
Interests: microbial toxins; oral microbial pathogens
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gerald E. Duhamel

Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: comparative gastrointestinal pathology; development and assessment of animal models of intestinal disease and basic understanding of molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions and their relationship to susceptibility and resistance against enteric diseases; microbial pathogenesis of enteropathogenic Campylobacter and Helicobacter bacterial species and mechanisms of cytolethal distending toxin-induced DNA damage response within the context of intestinal diseases of human and animals.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is a potent AB type genotoxin produced by more than 30 medically-important Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of the Gamma and Epsilon classes of Proteobacteria. Included amongst these bacteria are several pathotypes of Escherichia coli, certain species of Campylobacter, Helicobacter, and Shigella, and a clad of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes that collectively are responsible for the majority of clinically-important food-borne and water-borne zoonotic intestinal illnesses worldwide. Moreover, members of the Haemophilus species associated with chronic genital infections and acute sepsis and Aggregatibacter (formerly Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans a major periodontal disease pathogen also produce CDT; however, the contribution of CDT to microbial pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. Experimental studies to date have focused on mechanisms of CDT-induced eukaryotic cell genotoxicity in vitro and ex vivo, while few animal studies suggest a critical role for CDT in direct cell damage and resistance against host innate defense mechanisms. Alterations of host cell homeostasis likely contributes to infection and disease caused by CDT-producing bacterial pathogens, and thus, this Special Issue of Toxins will focus on molecular mechanisms of CDT-induced genotoxicity in the context of disease mechanisms. The goal is to increase our understanding of the contribution of this broadly-conserved genotoxin to mechanisms of infection and disease and provide a basis for development of control strategies for major bacterial pathogens of humans and animals.

Prof. Dr. Joseph M. DiRienzo
Prof. Dr. Gerald E. Duhamel
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • AB-toxin
  • cell cycle
  • cytolethal distending toxin
  • diarrheal disease
  • enteric bacteria
  • eukaryotic cell
  • genotoxin
  • nuclease
  • periodontal disease

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Impact of CDT Toxin on Human Diseases
Received: 10 February 2016 / Revised: 1 July 2016 / Accepted: 6 July 2016 / Published: 15 July 2016
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (1467 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is found in Gram-negative bacteria, especially in certain Proteobacteria such as the Pasteurellaceae family, including Haemophilus ducreyi and Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, in the Enterobacteriaceae family and the Campylobacterales order, including the Campylobacter and Helicobacter species. In vitro and [...] Read more.
Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is found in Gram-negative bacteria, especially in certain Proteobacteria such as the Pasteurellaceae family, including Haemophilus ducreyi and Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, in the Enterobacteriaceae family and the Campylobacterales order, including the Campylobacter and Helicobacter species. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly shown that this toxin has a strong effect on cellular physiology (inflammation, immune response modulation, tissue damage). Some works even suggest a potential involvement of CDT in cancers. In this review, we will discuss these different aspects. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Dynamic Duo—The Salmonella Cytolethal Distending Toxin Combines ADP-Ribosyltransferase and Nuclease Activities in a Novel Form of the Cytolethal Distending Toxin
Received: 3 March 2016 / Revised: 30 March 2016 / Accepted: 15 April 2016 / Published: 25 April 2016
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (844 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is a well characterized bacterial genotoxin encoded by several Gram-negative bacteria, including Salmonella enterica (S. enterica). The CDT produced by Salmonella (S-CDT) differs from the CDT produced by other bacteria, as it utilizes subunits with homology [...] Read more.
The cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is a well characterized bacterial genotoxin encoded by several Gram-negative bacteria, including Salmonella enterica (S. enterica). The CDT produced by Salmonella (S-CDT) differs from the CDT produced by other bacteria, as it utilizes subunits with homology to the pertussis and subtilase toxins, in place of the traditional CdtA and CdtC subunits. Previously, S-CDT was thought to be a unique virulence factor of S. enterica subspecies enterica serotype Typhi, lending to its classification as the “typhoid toxin.” Recently, this important virulence factor has been identified and characterized in multiple nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serotypes as well. The significance of S-CDT in salmonellosis with regards to the: (i) distribution of S-CDT encoding genes among NTS serotypes, (ii) contributions to pathogenicity, (iii) regulation of S-CDT expression, and (iv) the public health implication of S-CDT as it relates to disease severity, are reviewed here. Full article
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