Advances in Microalgae Toxins: Production, Detection, and Application 2.0

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine and Freshwater Toxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2024) | Viewed by 529

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Universidad de Almería, 04120 Almería, Spain
Interests: biochemical engineering; bioprocess; technology; microalgae; marine toxins; marine ecology; cell lysis; chemical engineering; industrial biotechnology; photobioreactors
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This is the second volume of the previous Issue, which includes several papers on microalgae toxins. Dinoflagellate microalgae are an important source of marine metabolites. These toxins and bioactives are of increasing interest because they influence the safety of seafood and their potential medical and biotechnological applications. Nowadays, bioactive supply is still the main bottleneck due to the difficulty of growing dinoflagellates in photobioreactors. Only sparing quantities of dinoflagellate bioactives are available for researchers, hindering their characterization and evaluation for possible applications. Despite this, advances have been made in every aspect related to the biotechnological exploitation of this resource in recent years. For instance, novel molecules and potential applications for dinoflagellate bioactives have been shown. Additionally, new approaches for culturing and downprocessing biomasses have been presented.

This Special Issue aims to provide insight into the potential of dinoflagellate’s bioactives to develop bioprocess with these microalgae and the remaining obstacles. Accordingly, it will foster contributions focused on dinoflagellates that address biodiscovery, metabolite characterization, cell culture, and bioprocess optimization (upstream and downstream). This Special Issue is intended to interest those involved in the field from different perspectives.

Dr. Juan Jose Gallardo Rodriguez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dinoflagellate
  • bioactives
  • bioprocess
  • marine toxins

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

18 pages, 7464 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Taxonomic and Functional Dynamics Associated with Harmful Algal Bloom Formation in Recreational Water Ecosystems
by Faizan Saleem, Rachelle Atrache, Jennifer L. Jiang, Kevin L. Tran, Enze Li, Athanasios Paschos, Thomas A. Edge and Herb E. Schellhorn
Toxins 2024, 16(6), 263; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins16060263 - 7 Jun 2024
Viewed by 259
Abstract
Harmful algal bloom (HAB) formation leads to the eutrophication of water ecosystems and may render recreational lakes unsuitable for human use. We evaluated the applicability and comparison of metabarcoding, metagenomics, qPCR, and ELISA-based methods for cyanobacteria/cyanotoxin detection in bloom and non-bloom sites for [...] Read more.
Harmful algal bloom (HAB) formation leads to the eutrophication of water ecosystems and may render recreational lakes unsuitable for human use. We evaluated the applicability and comparison of metabarcoding, metagenomics, qPCR, and ELISA-based methods for cyanobacteria/cyanotoxin detection in bloom and non-bloom sites for the Great Lakes region. DNA sequencing-based methods robustly identified differences between bloom and non-bloom samples (e.g., the relative prominence of Anabaena and Planktothrix). Shotgun sequencing strategies also identified the enrichment of metabolic genes typical of cyanobacteria in bloom samples, though toxin genes were not detected, suggesting deeper sequencing or PCR methods may be needed to detect low-abundance toxin genes. PCR and ELISA indicated microcystin levels and microcystin gene copies were significantly more abundant in bloom sites. However, not all bloom samples were positive for microcystin, possibly due to bloom development by non-toxin-producing species. Additionally, microcystin levels were significantly correlated (positively) with microcystin gene copy number but not with total cyanobacterial 16S gene copies. In summary, next-generation sequencing-based methods can identify specific taxonomic and functional targets, which can be used for absolute quantification methods (qPCR and ELISA) to augment conventional water monitoring strategies. Full article
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