Special Issue "Food Poisoning or Foodborne Intoxications Diagnosis and Treatment"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2022 | Viewed by 4040

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Davide Lonati
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Guest Editor
Poison Control Centre and National Toxicology Information Centre,Toxicology Unit, Istituti Clinici Scientifici Maugeri, IRCCS Maugeri Hospital and University of Pavia, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 10 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: food poisoning; intoxication; health safety; antidote; clinical toxicology; foodborne

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Foodborne toxins or pathogens may cause illnesses or intoxications, some of which are severe and lethal. Globalization and large-scale food preparations may pose a potential health risk, therefore a rapid identification of intoxication sources is essential for the prevention of food poisoning. Food poisoning can develop in multiple ways, as foodborne infections (caused by bacteria, parasites, viruses), botulism, intoxication by anticholinergic alkaloids present in vegetables and plants, mushrooms, marine food (by ciguatoxins, tetrodotoxin, and other algal toxins), scombroid syndrome, intoxication by illegal food additives, food contaminants (e.g., arsenic, mercury), or biological agents potentially used as terrorist weapons.

This Special Issue will focus on various and disparate aspects of food poisoning to provide a general and unique vision of a frequent and potentially serious problem.

Prof. Dr. Davide Lonati
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food poisoning
  • Intoxication
  • Health safety
  • Antidote
  • Clinical toxicology
  • Foodborne

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Acute Liver Failure after Ingestion of Fried Rice Balls: A Case Series of Bacillus cereus Food Poisonings
Toxins 2022, 14(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins14010012 - 23 Dec 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1746
Abstract
Bacillus cereus foodborne intoxications and toxicoinfections are on a rise. Usually, symptoms are self-limiting but occasionally hospitalization is necessary. Severe intoxications with the emetic Bacillus cereus toxin cereulide, which is notably resistant heat and acid during cooking, can cause acute liver failure and [...] Read more.
Bacillus cereus foodborne intoxications and toxicoinfections are on a rise. Usually, symptoms are self-limiting but occasionally hospitalization is necessary. Severe intoxications with the emetic Bacillus cereus toxin cereulide, which is notably resistant heat and acid during cooking, can cause acute liver failure and encephalopathy. We here present a case series of food poisonings in five immunocompetent adults after ingestion of fried rice balls, which were massively contaminated with Bacillus cereus. The patients developed a broad clinical spectrum, ranging from emesis and diarrhoea to life-threatening acute liver failure and acute tubular necrosis of the kidney in the index patient. In the left-over rice ball, we detected 8 × 106Bacillus cereus colony-forming units/g foodstuff, and cereulide in a concentration of 37 μg/g foodstuff, which is one of the highest cereulide toxin contaminations reported so far from foodborne outbreaks. This report emphasizes the potential biological hazard of contaminated rice meals that are not freshly prepared. It exemplifies the necessity of a multidisciplinary approach in cases of Bacillus cereus associated food poisonings to rapidly establish the diagnosis, to closely monitor critically ill patients, and to provide supportive measures for acute liver failure and—whenever necessary—urgent liver transplantation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Poisoning or Foodborne Intoxications Diagnosis and Treatment)
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Article
Quantification of Heavy Metals and Pesticide Residues in Widely Consumed Nigerian Food Crops Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and Gas Chromatography (GC)
Toxins 2021, 13(12), 870; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins13120870 - 06 Dec 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1695
Abstract
More still needs to be learned regards the relative contamination of heavy metals and pesticide residues, particularly those found in widely consumed Nigerian food crops like cereals, vegetables, and tubers. In this current study, the heavy metals and pesticide residues detectable in widely [...] Read more.
More still needs to be learned regards the relative contamination of heavy metals and pesticide residues, particularly those found in widely consumed Nigerian food crops like cereals, vegetables, and tubers. In this current study, the heavy metals and pesticide residues detectable in widely consumed Nigerian food crops were respectively quantified using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and gas chromatography (GC). Specifically, the widely consumed Nigerian food crops included cereals (rice, millet, and maize), legume (soybean), tubers (yam and cassava), as well as leaf (fluted pumpkin, Amaranthus leaf, waterleaf, and scent leaf) and fruit vegetables (okro, cucumber, carrot, and watermelon). Results showed that the detected heavy metals included arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), and nickel (Ni), whereas the pesticide residues included Aldrin, Carbofuran, g-chlordane, Chlorpyrifos, DichloroBiphenyl, Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD), Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), Dichlorvos, Endosulfan, Heptachlor, Hexachlorobenzene (HCB), Isopropylamine, Lindane, t-nonachlor, and Profenofos. Across the studied food crops, the concentrations of heavy metals and pesticides were varied, with different trends as they largely fell below the established maximum permissible limits, and with some exceptions. Our findings suggest there could be a somewhat gradual decline in the concentration of the heavy metals and pesticide residues of these studied food crops when compared to previously published reports specific to Nigeria. To help substantiate this observation and supplement existing information, further investigations are required into the concentration of these heavy metals and pesticide residues specific to these studied food crops at other parts of the country. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Poisoning or Foodborne Intoxications Diagnosis and Treatment)
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