Special Issue "Urban Street Networks and Sustainable Transportation"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Moeinaddini Mehdi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Local Environment & Management Analysis (LEMA), Urban and Environmental Engineering (UEE), University of Liège, Allée de la Découverte, Quartier Polytech, 4000 Liège, Belgium
Interests: sustainable transportation and urban planning; urban street networks, urban streets, and shared spaces; bicyclist and pedestrian facilities design and planning; the pedestrian and bicyclist highway safety problem; transport safety at the city level

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urban street space is challenged with a variety of emerging usages and users, such as various vehicles with different speeds, passenger pick-up and drop-off by mobility services, increasing parking demand for a variety of private and shared vehicles, new powertrains (e.g., charging units), and new vehicles and services fueled by digitalization and vehicle automation. These new usages compete with established functions of streets such as providing space for mobility, social interactions, and cultural and recreational activities. The combination of these functions makes streets focal points of communities that do not only fulfill a functional role but also provide identity to cities. Streets are prominent parts of cities and are essential to sustainable transport plans. The main aim of this issue is to focus on urban street networks and their effects on sustainable transportation. Accordingly, various street elements related to mobility, public transport, parking, design, and movement of people and goods at the street level can be included.

Dr. Moeinaddini Mehdi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Linking urban street networks to sustainability
  • Urban street network analysis
  • Urban street network monitoring and management
  • Systematic methods in street assessment and design
  • New sources of data for urban street networks and its use in the level of service and safety
  • Advances in technologies and methods used in collecting data for urban street networks
  • Measures of the level of service, safety, conflicts, and other related estimations at the street level
  • New data and methods for improving the safety of pedestrians, bicyclists, e-scooters, etc
  • Urban street networks and automated and connected vehicle data
  • Decision making using street data
  • Urban street networks, machine learning methods, and big data
  • Evaluating and visualizing the performance of urban street networks using big data

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Measurement Quality Appraisal Instrument for Evaluation of Walkability Assessment Tools Based on Walking Needs
Sustainability 2021, 13(20), 11342; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011342 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 305
Abstract
Walking is a sustainable commute mode, and walkability is considered an essential sign of sustainable mobility. To date, many walkability assessment tools have been developed to assess the walkability conditions across the world. However, there is a paucity of comprehensive methods to assess [...] Read more.
Walking is a sustainable commute mode, and walkability is considered an essential sign of sustainable mobility. To date, many walkability assessment tools have been developed to assess the walkability conditions across the world. However, there is a paucity of comprehensive methods to assess current walkability tools based on walking needs and ensure all walking requirements are included. Thus, researchers and experts are unable to select the most comprehensive tool systematically. The present study attempts to develop a system to evaluate the quality of the existing tools. The instrument focuses on factors related to walking needs frequently observed in all types of walkability assessment tools. Hence, a pilot measurement quality appraisal instrument (MQAI) is developed and tested by a research team with planning and public health backgrounds. The final MQAI is tested by suitable reliability, criterion, and content validity tests. Most appraisal scales display moderate to high reliability for both audits and questionnaires. The MQAI appears as ready for use in several applications, including meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Additionally, the MQAI can be used by practitioners and planners to identify the most comprehensive and efficient assessment tools based on their needs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Street Networks and Sustainable Transportation)
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Article
Guidance and Practice in Planning Cycling Facilities in Europe—An Overview
Sustainability 2021, 13(17), 9560; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13179560 - 25 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 580
Abstract
The provision of convenient, safe and seamless facilities for cyclists is one core success factor in promoting cycling as a mode of transport. Cycling infrastructures and planning philosophies differ greatly between countries, but there is no systematic overview or comparison of similarities and [...] Read more.
The provision of convenient, safe and seamless facilities for cyclists is one core success factor in promoting cycling as a mode of transport. Cycling infrastructures and planning philosophies differ greatly between countries, but there is no systematic overview or comparison of similarities and dissimilarities. The aim of this study is to provide an in-depth international overview of guidance material for cycling facilities in European countries and to develop recommendations for advancing provisions for cyclists. International guidance materials for cycling facilities along street sections are collated, systemised and compared. For researchers, the findings provide background information to better understand cycling behaviour and safety. For planners, the findings support their efforts to support cycling and to improve guidance materials. The results show that, in general, countries that are just beginning to promote cycling tend to offer a greater variety of cycling infrastructures in their guidance materials than more mature cycling countries. Countries differ in whether they prefer to put cyclists on the street level or on the sidewalk and whether they mix cyclists with other user groups in the same space. There was even greater variability among countries in the criteria for selecting types of cycling facilities than in the design characteristics (width, buffer zones, etc.). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Street Networks and Sustainable Transportation)
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Article
Built Environment Determinants of Pedestrian Activities and Their Consideration in Urban Street Design
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 9362; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13169362 - 20 Aug 2021
Viewed by 715
Abstract
Pedestrian facilities have been regarded in urban street design as “leftover spaces” for years, but, currently, there is a growing interest in walking and improving the quality of street environments. Designing pedestrian facilities presents the challenge of simultaneously accommodating (1) pedestrians who want [...] Read more.
Pedestrian facilities have been regarded in urban street design as “leftover spaces” for years, but, currently, there is a growing interest in walking and improving the quality of street environments. Designing pedestrian facilities presents the challenge of simultaneously accommodating (1) pedestrians who want to move safely and comfortably from point A to B (movement function); as well as (2) users who wish to rest, communicate, shop, eat, and enjoy life in a pleasant environment (place function). The aims of this study are to provide an overview of how the task of designing pedestrian facilities is addressed in international guidance material for urban street design, to compare this with scientific evidence on determinants of pedestrian activities, and to finally develop recommendations for advancing provisions for pedestrians. The results show that urban street design guidance is well advanced in measuring space requirements for known volumes of moving pedestrians, but less in planning pleasant street environments that encourage pedestrian movement and place activities. A stronger linkage to scientific evidence could improve guidance materials and better support urban street designers in their ambition to provide safe, comfortable and attractive street spaces that invite people to walk and to stay. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Street Networks and Sustainable Transportation)
Article
Hierarchical Longitudinal Control for Connected and Automated Vehicles in Mixed Traffic on a Signalized Arterial
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 8852; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13168852 - 07 Aug 2021
Viewed by 583
Abstract
This paper proposes a two-layer hierarchical longitudinal control approach that optimizes travel time and trajectories along multiple intersections on an arterial under mixed traffic of connected automated vehicles (CAV) and human-driven vehicles (HV). The upper layer optimizes the travel time in an optimization [...] Read more.
This paper proposes a two-layer hierarchical longitudinal control approach that optimizes travel time and trajectories along multiple intersections on an arterial under mixed traffic of connected automated vehicles (CAV) and human-driven vehicles (HV). The upper layer optimizes the travel time in an optimization loop, and the lower layer formulates a longitudinal controller to optimize the movement of CAVs in each block of an urban arterial by applying optimal control. Four scenarios are considered for optimal control based on the physical constraints of vehicles and the relationship between estimated arrival times and traffic signal timing. In each scenario, the estimated minimized travel time is systematically obtained from the upper layer. As the results indicate, the proposed method significantly improves the mobility of the signalized corridor with mixed traffic by minimizing stops and smoothing trajectories, and the travel time reduction is up to 29.33% compared to the baseline when no control is applied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Street Networks and Sustainable Transportation)
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