sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Technology-Powered Strategies for Sustainability of Cultural Heritage"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Tourism, Culture, and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (17 January 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Martín López-Nores
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Telematics Engineering, University of Vigo, EE Telecomunicación, Campus Universitario s/n, 36310 Vigo, Spain
Interests: Applied Artificial Intelligence; knowledge modeling; semantic reasoning; interactive storytelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Angeliki Antoniou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, University of Peloponnese, Terma Karaiskaki, 22100 Tripolis, Greece
Interests: Technologies and applications for cultural heritage; educational games (formal, non-formal and informal learning); augmented reality; user profiling; personalization; group adaptation; social networks; crowdsourcing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Catherine Emma Jones
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning, University of Luxembourg, 2 University Avenue, L-4365 Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg
Interests: Geospatial data and analysis; Human-Computer Interaction; collective memory and place making; urban discovery; gamification; location-based services

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainability of cultural heritage is a cornerstone for governments around the world due to its impact in economic development, social inclusion and cohesion, education, tourism and innovation. However, it is jeopardized whenever one of the following two opposites is reached:

  • On the one hand, the pressure exerted on popular museums, buildings, archaeological sites or historical city centers –for instance, as a consequence of mass tourism– poses growing challenges to heritage professionals, institutions and stakeholders to protect and enhance the cultural assets as well as the territory around them.
  • On the other hand, the lesser-known heritage –which is widespread– oftentimes incurs significant management and preservation costs for the benefit of reduced numbers of residents or visitors; in many cases, especially for the intangible heritage of social minorities, the levels of awareness and visibility are very low, and there are increasing risks that the heritage may be lost in the matter of a few years or decades.

During the last decades, Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) have revolutionized the ways in which cultural heritage information can be gathered from, managed by and delivered to residents, tourists, businesses, Humanities experts and policymakers. This special issue aims to gather insight into how the latest advances in ICTs can contribute to the sustainability of cultural heritage –both to alleviate the pressure on the popular assets and to increase the preservation and valorization of the lesser-known ones– by empowering any of the aforementioned stakeholder groups. Theoretical papers, technical ones and case studies are all welcome.

The topics of interest include any combinations of strategic goals and enabling technologies. The goals may relate to the following (not an exhaustive list):

  • New approaches to fighting information overload in the examination and presentation of cultural heritage information.
  • Technology-assisted sensemaking from existing digital archives of cultural heritage information.
  • Best practices and innovative methods to develop sustainable and smart approaches to cultural heritage.
  • Technological aids for collective memory, placemaking and local development planning.
  • Technology-powered strategies to rethink the pedagogy of history and cultural heritage.
  • Strategies to stimulate reflection, retention and re-interpretation of cultural heritage, through multi-perspective approaches to the study of the past.

The enabling technologies relevant to the special issue, in turn, include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Knowledge representation and modelling for cultural heritage content.
    • Metadata standards and datasets.
    • Automated reasoning and computational argumentation.
    • Management of multiple viewpoints and uncertain information.
    • Geospatial data and analysis.
  • Personalization/recommendation technologies applied to cultural heritage content.
    • Profiling techniques for individuals, groups and crowds.
    • Context awareness.
    • Personalized storytelling.
    • Adaptive navigation and browsing.
    • Group adaptation.
  • Crowdsourcing and crowd computing methodologies, tools and case studies.
    • Creativity and collaboration.
    • Social interaction and argumentation.
    • Incentive schemes.
  • Interaction with cultural heritage content.
    • Urban and rural discovery.
    • Gamification.
    • Location-based services.
    • Augmented and Virtual Reality.

Prof. Dr. Martín López-Nores
Prof. Dr. Angeliki Antoniou
Prof. Dr. Catherine Emma Jones
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cultural heritage protection and promotion
  • Information and Communication Technologies
  • Knowledge representation and modelling
  • Personalization and recommendation
  • Crowdsourcing and crowd computing
  • Sensemaking and placemaking

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Capturing the City’s Heritage On-the-Go: Design Requirements for Mobile Crowdsourced Cultural Heritage
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2429; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062429 - 20 Mar 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1510
Abstract
Intangible Cultural Heritage is at a continuous risk of extinction. Where historical artefacts engine the machinery of intercontinental mass-tourism, socio-technical changes are reshaping the anthropomorphic landscapes everywhere on the globe, at an unprecedented rate. There is an increasing urge to tap into the [...] Read more.
Intangible Cultural Heritage is at a continuous risk of extinction. Where historical artefacts engine the machinery of intercontinental mass-tourism, socio-technical changes are reshaping the anthropomorphic landscapes everywhere on the globe, at an unprecedented rate. There is an increasing urge to tap into the hidden semantics and the anecdotes surrounding people, memories and places. The vast cultural knowledge made of testimony, oral history and traditions constitutes a rich cultural ontology tying together human beings, times, and situations. Altogether, these complex, multidimensional features make the task of data-mapping of intangible cultural heritage a problem of sustainability and preservation. This paper addresses a suggested route for conceiving, designing and appraising a digital framework intended to support the conservation of the intangible experience, from a user and a collective-centred perspective. The framework is designed to help capture the intangible cultural value of all places exhibiting cultural-historical significance, supported by an extensive analysis of the literature. We present a set of design recommendations for designing mobile apps that are intended to converge crowdsourcing to Intangible Cultural Heritage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Powered Strategies for Sustainability of Cultural Heritage)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Fashion Everydayness as a Cultural Revolution in Social Media Platforms—Focus on Fashion Instagrammers
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 1979; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051979 - 05 Mar 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1892
Abstract
This study qualitatively analyzes the phenomenon of fashion everydayness as a cultural revolution in the digital space as everyday life continues to expand into digital platforms. The analysis proceeded in four perspectives based on Lefebvre’s theoretical framework: the festivalization of everyday life, the [...] Read more.
This study qualitatively analyzes the phenomenon of fashion everydayness as a cultural revolution in the digital space as everyday life continues to expand into digital platforms. The analysis proceeded in four perspectives based on Lefebvre’s theoretical framework: the festivalization of everyday life, the artification of everyday life, the holistic stylization of everyday life, and cultural revolution as a daily practice. Instagram, the case for this study and the most popular image-centric social network, leads the digital aesthetics paradigm through creative acts that weave fashion into the daily life of the individual. The study focuses on three fashion mega-influencers whose successful careers began with blogs documenting their daily lives. The analysis showed that Instagram, as a social platform, is a creative space for sharing everyday life with its appropriation of time and space. In there, fashion visualizes the look of the everyday beyond the boundaries of time and space. In practice, it suggests a digital cultural revolution: a composite lifestyle expressive of various tastes and styles—a vital medium to inspire and sustain fashion everydayness. This has implications that the information and communication technology of the digital age created a new cultural space and that daily visualization through fashion will eventually produce sustainable cultural contents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Powered Strategies for Sustainability of Cultural Heritage)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
On How Technology-Powered Storytelling Can Contribute to Cultural Heritage Sustainability across Multiple Venues—Evidence from the CrossCult H2020 Project
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1666; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041666 - 23 Feb 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1569
Abstract
Sustainability in Cultural Heritage (CH) is a complex question that needs to be addressed by a group of experts tackling the different issues. In this light, the present work wishes to provide a multi-level analysis of the sustainability in CH, using as an [...] Read more.
Sustainability in Cultural Heritage (CH) is a complex question that needs to be addressed by a group of experts tackling the different issues. In this light, the present work wishes to provide a multi-level analysis of the sustainability in CH, using as an example a recent European H2020 project (CrossCult) and the lessons learnt from its design, implementation and evaluation. The sustainability of CH has qualitatively changed over the last few years, under the developments in digital technology that seems to affect the very nature of the cultural experience. We discuss sustainability in venues using digital technologies, covering a span of needs of small/unknown and large/popular venues, which try to enhance the visitor experience, attract visitors, form venue networks, etc. Moreover, we explore issues of sustainability of digital content and its re usability through holistic design. Aspects of technology, human networks and data sustainability are also presented, and we conclude with the arguments concerning the sustainability of visitor reflection, the interpretation of social and historical phenomena and the creation of meaning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Powered Strategies for Sustainability of Cultural Heritage)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Representation and Preservation of Heritage Crafts
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1461; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041461 - 15 Feb 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1944
Abstract
This work regards the digital representation of tangible and intangible dimensions of heritage crafts, towards craft preservation. Based on state-of-the-art digital documentation, knowledge representation and narrative creation approach are presented. Craft presentation methods that use the represented content to provide accurate, intuitive, engaging, [...] Read more.
This work regards the digital representation of tangible and intangible dimensions of heritage crafts, towards craft preservation. Based on state-of-the-art digital documentation, knowledge representation and narrative creation approach are presented. Craft presentation methods that use the represented content to provide accurate, intuitive, engaging, and educational ways for HC presentation and appreciation are proposed. The proposed methods aim to contribute to HC preservation, by adding value to the cultural visit, before, and after it. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Powered Strategies for Sustainability of Cultural Heritage)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Augmenting Museum Communication Services to Create Young Audiences
Sustainability 2019, 11(20), 5830; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11205830 - 21 Oct 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1355
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how museums use Augmented Reality (AR) to enhance communication services with their audiences and attract new ones. Still, there is no definite answer to how young audiences perceive the educational effects of experiencing this augmented [...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how museums use Augmented Reality (AR) to enhance communication services with their audiences and attract new ones. Still, there is no definite answer to how young audiences perceive the educational effects of experiencing this augmented space of communication as an immersive medium. This study is based on a survey of 400 students after they visited an AR technology-enhanced exhibition held by a local history museum. Two stimulus–response marketing scale metrics, widely used to assess TV commercials, were adapted for AR experiences and validated. The mediation analysis revealed an intervening emotional mechanism, in which the multisensory AR experience has educational effects through entertainment and empathy. An improved stimulus–response empirical model is proposed, in which AR technologies, as environmental multisensory stimuli, produce cognitive responses through emotional immersion. The findings have significance in improving how museums encode their message using AR technologies as a secondary communication medium with young audiences. This study could help museum professionals and application developers to find AR implementation solutions as service tools to enhancing user experience by using a widely tested scale for evaluating TV commercials applied to measure AR experiences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Powered Strategies for Sustainability of Cultural Heritage)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Review of Methods for Documentation, Management, and Sustainability of Cultural Heritage. Case Study: Museum of King Jan III’s Palace at Wilanów
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 7046; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11247046 - 09 Dec 2019
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 1947
Abstract
All countries around the world are blessed with particularly rich cultural heritage. Nowadays, many researchers are exploring different methods for documentation, management, and sustainability of cultural heritage. The aim of this article is to review the state-of-the-art documentation, management, and sustainability techniques in [...] Read more.
All countries around the world are blessed with particularly rich cultural heritage. Nowadays, many researchers are exploring different methods for documentation, management, and sustainability of cultural heritage. The aim of this article is to review the state-of-the-art documentation, management, and sustainability techniques in the field of cultural heritage based on the case study in the Museum of King Jan III’s Palace at Wilanów. Various 2D/3D image and range-based methods are discussed demonstrating their applications and drawbacks. The geographical information system (GIS) is presented as a method for management, storage, and maintenance of cultural heritage documentation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Powered Strategies for Sustainability of Cultural Heritage)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop