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Open AccessArticle

On How Technology-Powered Storytelling Can Contribute to Cultural Heritage Sustainability across Multiple Venues—Evidence from the CrossCult H2020 Project

1
Former CrossCult Fellow, Research Department, The National Gallery, London WC2N 5DN, UK
2
Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, University of the Peloponnese, 22100 Tripoli, Greece
3
AtlantTIC Research Center, Department of Telematics Engineering, University of Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Spain
4
Group of Studies in Archaeology, Antiquity and Territory, University of Vigo, 32004 Ourense, Spain
5
Dipartamento dei Beni Culturali, Università Degli Studi di Padova, 35122 Padova, Italy
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Department of Information and Computing Sciences, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands
7
Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education, University of Luxembourg, L-4365 Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg
8
Research Department, The National Gallery, London WC2N 5DN, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Department of Information Studies, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.
Current address: Study Center classicA, Università Iuav di Venezia, 30135 Venice, Italy.
§
Current address: Department of Prehistory and Archaeology, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid/MIAS, 28049 Madrid, Spain.
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1666; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041666
Received: 17 January 2020 / Revised: 7 February 2020 / Accepted: 9 February 2020 / Published: 23 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology-Powered Strategies for Sustainability of Cultural Heritage)
Sustainability in Cultural Heritage (CH) is a complex question that needs to be addressed by a group of experts tackling the different issues. In this light, the present work wishes to provide a multi-level analysis of the sustainability in CH, using as an example a recent European H2020 project (CrossCult) and the lessons learnt from its design, implementation and evaluation. The sustainability of CH has qualitatively changed over the last few years, under the developments in digital technology that seems to affect the very nature of the cultural experience. We discuss sustainability in venues using digital technologies, covering a span of needs of small/unknown and large/popular venues, which try to enhance the visitor experience, attract visitors, form venue networks, etc. Moreover, we explore issues of sustainability of digital content and its re usability through holistic design. Aspects of technology, human networks and data sustainability are also presented, and we conclude with the arguments concerning the sustainability of visitor reflection, the interpretation of social and historical phenomena and the creation of meaning. View Full-Text
Keywords: cultural heritage; sustainability; storytelling; digital humanities cultural heritage; sustainability; storytelling; digital humanities
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Kontiza, K.; Antoniou, A.; Daif, A.; Reboreda-Morillo, S.; Bassani, M.; González-Soutelo, S.; Lykourentzou, I.; Jones, C.E.; Padfield, J.; López-Nores, M. On How Technology-Powered Storytelling Can Contribute to Cultural Heritage Sustainability across Multiple Venues—Evidence from the CrossCult H2020 Project. Sustainability 2020, 12, 1666.

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