Special Issue "Buildings and Infrastructures Management: Models Strategies and Evaluation Tools"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Giovanna Acampa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, University of Enna KORE, Italy
Interests: evaluation; architecture; cost management; BIM
Prof. Dr. Moshe Tshuva
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Afeka College of Engineering, Tel Aviv, Israel
Interests: solving problems; energy efficiency; evaluation of pollution; mega-cities transportation challenges
Prof. Dr. Maurizio Nicolella
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering , University of Naples Federico II, Italy
Interests: maintenance; durability; LCA; LCC; materials; sustainability; maintainability
Prof. Dr. Tiziana Campisi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, University of Enna KORE, 94100 Enna, Italy
Interests: transport data collection; shared mobility; road-vulnerable users; smart mobility and MaaS; microsimulation; accessibility; mobility choice
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will consist of papers describing the state of the art in the scientific debate on the management of existing buildings and infrastructure. All over the world, the current trend is to preserve existing buildings and maintain infrastructure at a high level of efficiency. At the same time, their degradation is often increased by the effects of climate change, earthquakes, and landslides. Consequently, there is a growing interest in optimizing restoration and maintenance actions complying with budgets. From this point of view, it is important to understand the evolution of degradation. Monitoring systems, information models, and evaluation tools are key to facilitating data collection useful to optimize time, costs, and quality of interventions. Building and infrastructure models should be useful to enhance the management of our towns and to identify, analyze, and evaluate sustainable interventions to ensure a safe healthy and functional environment.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Management and maintenance of cultural heritage;

- Management of transportation infrastructure;

- Management of existing buildings;

- Life-cycle analysis (LCA) of buildings;

- Life-cycle analysis (LCA) of infrastructure;

- Economic evaluation tools;

- Building information modeling (BIM) for heritage;

- Building information modeling (BIM) for infrastructure;

- City information modeling (CIM);

- Impact of climate change on buildings;

- Monitoring models of degradation.

Prof. Dr. Giovanna Acampa
Prof. Dr. Moshe Tshuva
Prof. Dr. Maurizio Nicolella
Dr. Tiziana Campisi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Management Maintenance cost
  • Building infrastructure degradation
  • BIM
  • CIM
  • Evaluation tools
  • Monitoring system

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Assessing the Transformability of Public Housing through BIM
Sustainability 2021, 13(10), 5431; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105431 - 12 May 2021
Viewed by 228
Abstract
Public residential buildings make a large portion of the European existing stock and they quite often require deep renovation interventions. A methodology for setting priorities and targeting regeneration investments should be defined relying on the increasing use of building information modelling (BIM) tools [...] Read more.
Public residential buildings make a large portion of the European existing stock and they quite often require deep renovation interventions. A methodology for setting priorities and targeting regeneration investments should be defined relying on the increasing use of building information modelling (BIM) tools even for managing existing buildings. The aim of this paper is to integrate the evaluation process into BIM Revit software developing a specific plug-in, a Decision support system (DSS) that will help to identify the most appropriate flats to be transformed. It is based on measuring three indicators: Usability, Fragmentation, and Constructive Modifiability. Through their weighted average it is possible to obtain a final transformability score. The proposed approach has been tested on a case study chosen within the 1st P.E.E.P. (1st public plan for council and affordable housing) that has been approved in Rome in 1964. The results demonstrate that the transformability of apartments is related mainly to the Constructive Modifiability indicator and buildings with reinforced concrete frames show higher scores. A widespread application of such a methodology on large real estate portfolio may lead stakeholders involved in housing management investments in clear choices related to maintenance of buildings. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
BIM and IoT Sensors Integration: A Framework for Consumption and Indoor Conditions Data Monitoring of Existing Buildings
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4496; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084496 - 17 Apr 2021
Viewed by 456
Abstract
The low accessibility to the information regarding buildings current performances causes deep difficulties in planning appropriate interventions. Internet of Things (IoT) sensors make available a high quantity of data on energy consumptions and indoor conditions of an existing building that can drive the [...] Read more.
The low accessibility to the information regarding buildings current performances causes deep difficulties in planning appropriate interventions. Internet of Things (IoT) sensors make available a high quantity of data on energy consumptions and indoor conditions of an existing building that can drive the choice of energy retrofit interventions. Moreover, the current developments in the topic of the digital twin are leading the diffusion of Building Information Modeling (BIM) methods and tools that can provide valid support to manage all data and information for the retrofit process. This paper shows the aim and the findings of research focused on testing the integrated use of BIM methodology and IoT systems. A common data platform for the visualization of building indoor conditions (e.g., temperature, luminance etc.) and of energy consumption parameters was carried out. This platform, tested on a case study located in Italy, is developed with the integration of low-cost IoT sensors and the Revit model. To obtain a dynamic and automated exchange of data between the sensors and the BIM model, the Revit software was integrated with the Dynamo visual programming platform and with a specific Application Programming Interface (API). It is an easy and straightforward tool that can provide building managers with real-time data and information about the energy consumption and the indoor conditions of buildings, but also allows for viewing of the historical sensor data table and creating graphical historical sensor data. Furthermore, the BIM model allows the management of other useful information about the building, such as dimensional data, functions, characteristics of the components of the building, maintenance status etc., which are essential for a much more conscious, effective and accurate management of the building and for defining the most suitable retrofit scenarios. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Methodological Approach for Assessing the Safety of Historic Buildings’ Façades
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2812; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052812 - 05 Mar 2021
Viewed by 395
Abstract
Inefficiency in maintaining and managing architectural heritage threatens both heritage conservation and public safety. Damage related to collapsed building elements requires an investigation into the factors which cause these phenomena in order to prevent them and to mitigate their effects. This paper aims [...] Read more.
Inefficiency in maintaining and managing architectural heritage threatens both heritage conservation and public safety. Damage related to collapsed building elements requires an investigation into the factors which cause these phenomena in order to prevent them and to mitigate their effects. This paper aims to define a methodological approach for assessing the risk to humans of falling bodies from historic buildings’ façades. The method is based on the identification of a group of parameters to assess façade’s hazards, vulnerability and public exposure. The results provide the identification of risk factors and related affecting parameters, proposing a synthetic indicator to quantify the risk. The proposal is original in the field of both maintenance planning and preventive maintenance, intending to preserve architectural heritage and public safety. The results lead to an easy tool, as a map, to prioritise risk mitigation interventions. Such a tool, if integrated into maintenance tenders, allows the evaluation, in the context of condition-based maintenance, of the need for interventions. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Applying the Depreciated Replacement Cost Method When Assessing the Market Value of Public Property Lacking Comparables and Income Data
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 8993; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218993 - 29 Oct 2020
Viewed by 453
Abstract
The growing interest in the enhancement, management, and sale of public building stock has increased the importance of their valuation and, as a result, the need to identify suitable methods for estimating value that take into account their peculiarities. They often boast architectural [...] Read more.
The growing interest in the enhancement, management, and sale of public building stock has increased the importance of their valuation and, as a result, the need to identify suitable methods for estimating value that take into account their peculiarities. They often boast architectural features (interfloor distance, layout, finishings, types of wiring/heating systems, etc.) that make them ‘extraordinary’ assets; in some cases, these features also endow them with monumental and/or historical importance. Thus, when valuating, it is necessary to adopt suitable methods. Where comparable examples or income-based parameters specifically concerning buildings with special features are lacking, the Depreciated Replacement Cost (DRC) method is the only system that can be used to estimate their market value. This paper aims to show how the DRC method can be applied in this specific market. The theoretical part will be coupled with a practical section where the DRC method will be used to estimate the market value of an extraordinary landmark building in Rome (Italy), the Palazzo degli Archivi di Stato (the State Archives building), in the EUR district, sold by EUR S.p.A. group (formerly known as Ente EUR) in 2015. Full article
Open AccessArticle
An Integrated Procedure for Ex-Ante Evaluations of Refurbishment Costs in Healthcare Facilities
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7387; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187387 - 09 Sep 2020
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Abstract
This paper focuses on the valuation of refurbishment costs for healthcare facilities. The determination of the more reliable approach for experimental verification is a research topic of great interest, especially because previous literature on the matter is limited. This study examines ex-ante cost [...] Read more.
This paper focuses on the valuation of refurbishment costs for healthcare facilities. The determination of the more reliable approach for experimental verification is a research topic of great interest, especially because previous literature on the matter is limited. This study examines ex-ante cost valuations in the refurbishment of healthcare buildings while using similarity to estimate the costs that are based on the amount of already accomplished renovations. The methodology involved a desk analysis deter-mining the technical valuation of intervention needs, and similarity coefficient applications providing a refurbishment cost valuation. The application was conducted in the Friuli—Venezia Giulia Region in Italy, where hospitals show structural, layout, and plants deficits with respect to current regulations, and a technical deepening to identify critical issues is required to prepare a multi-year intervention plan. The case study results showed that this procedure requires little initial information to run analyses and its application can support investment budget planning purposes. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Mortars with Recycled Aggregates from Building-Related Processes: A ‘Four-Step’ Methodological Proposal for a Review
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2756; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052756 - 04 Mar 2021
Viewed by 331
Abstract
Because the production of aggregates for mortar and concrete is no longer sustainable, many attempts have been made to replace natural aggregates (NA) with recycled aggregates (RA) sourced from factories, recycling centers, and human activities such as construction and demolition works (C&D). This [...] Read more.
Because the production of aggregates for mortar and concrete is no longer sustainable, many attempts have been made to replace natural aggregates (NA) with recycled aggregates (RA) sourced from factories, recycling centers, and human activities such as construction and demolition works (C&D). This article reviews papers concerning mortars with fine RA from C&D debris, and from the by-products of the manufacturing and recycling processes of building materials. A four-step methodology based on searching, screening, clustering, and summarizing was proposed. The clustering variables were the type of aggregate, mix design parameters, tested properties, patents, and availability on the market. The number and the type of the clustering variables of each paper were analysed and compared. The results showed that the mortars were mainly characterized through their physical and mechanical properties, whereas few durability and thermal analyses were carried out. Moreover, few fine RA were sourced from the production waste of construction materials. Finally, there were no patents or products available on the market. The outcomes presented in this paper underlined the research trends that are useful to improve the knowledge on the suitability of fine RA from building-related processes in mortars. Full article
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