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Special Issue "Motivations, Drivers, and Barriers to the Development of Sustainable Agri-Food Systems and Consumption Patterns"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Wildlife".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Maria Cecilia Mancini

Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Aziendali, Università di Parma, 43121 Parma, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +39 0521 902383
Interests: food quality schemes; geographical indications; consumer perception; rural development; animal welfare economics; localised agri-food systems; short food supply chains

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Agri-food systems call for ecologically sustainable farming practices and food products purchased in ways that promote the socioeconomic viability of the agri-food systems. On the other hand, consumer demand in industrialised markets is driven by conflictual needs, ranging from low prices to ethical and health concerns.

Despite the environmental alarms, both agri-food systems and consumers still experience major difficulties in the road to sustainability. The research question of this Special Issue is: What are the stakeholders’ motivations and barriers to the development of sustainable agri-food systems and consumption patterns? We expect that the outcomes of this Special Issue will be thought-provoking to policy makers and support the development of sustainable practices in agri-food production and consumption. 

This Special Issue welcomes papers that:

  • analyse the socioeconomics of sustainable agri-food systems, including localised agri-food systems and short food supply chains;
  • analyse consumers’ perception towards sustainable consumption practices (e.g., waste disposal) and products (e.g., animal-welfare-friendly products);
  • study or propose new sustainable paradigms for conventional agri-food production and distribution systems;
  • propose potential paths of sustainable development in term of consumption patterns, including recommendations to policy-makers;
  • use innovative methodologies to evaluate or describe the stakeholders’ motivations, drivers and barriers to the development of sustainable agri-food systems and consumption patterns

Dr. Maria Cecilia Mancini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • localised agri-food systems
  • short food supply chains
  • consumer perception
  • socioeconomics of sustainable agri-food systems
  • stakeholders’ motivations
  • barriers
  • quality food schemes
  • ethical concerns
  • health concerns
  • animal welfare
  • geographical indications
  • policy recommendations
  • new paradigm of production
  • conventional agri-food production system

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Economic Drivers of Legume Production: Approached via Opportunity Costs and Transaction Costs
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 705; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030705
Received: 21 December 2018 / Revised: 22 January 2019 / Accepted: 26 January 2019 / Published: 29 January 2019
PDF Full-text (260 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Crop diversification is one of the main mechanisms identified for developing a more sustainable agriculture. Legumes are interesting diversifying crops to add to crop rotations because of their many positive impacts on agronomic systems. Nonetheless, production of these crops remains relatively low in [...] Read more.
Crop diversification is one of the main mechanisms identified for developing a more sustainable agriculture. Legumes are interesting diversifying crops to add to crop rotations because of their many positive impacts on agronomic systems. Nonetheless, production of these crops remains relatively low in Europe, in part because of socio-economic factors. The objective of this study was to analyze how the economic attractiveness of legumes may be influenced by two factors: opportunity costs and transaction costs. The method is divided into three steps. First, we built a database of opportunity costs of legumes from a literature review. Second, we qualitatively characterized transaction costs associated with exchange of legumes between producers and collectors. Third, we qualitatively analyzed if contracts currently offered in western France decreased transaction costs. For comparison, transaction costs of linseed were also studied. Our results indicate that legumes are economically attractive at the rotation scale due to zero or negative opportunity costs, but that their transaction costs are high. The contracts studied do not decrease these transaction costs sufficiently, in particular because uncertainties in price remain high in half of these contracts. Downstream differentiation seems necessary to decrease transaction costs by creating added value along the entire agro-food chain. Full article
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