Special Issue "Academic Contributions to the UNESCO 2019 Forum on Education for Sustainable Development and Global Citizenship"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Quan-Hoang Vuong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre Emile Bernheim, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels, Belgium
Interests: emerging capital markets, data management, scientific data, applied statistics (frequentist and Bayesian), emerging market economics, financial database systems, sustainable financial management, entrepreneurial finance.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Le Anh Vinh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Vietnam Institute of Educational Sciences, Ministry of Education and Training, Hanoi, Vietnam
Interests: Mathematics, probability, science and education policy, education sciences, STEM education, and global citizenship education
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Tran Trung
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Vietnam Academy for Ethnic Minorities, Committee for Ethnic Minority Affairs, Hanoi 100000, Vietnam
Interests: Mathematics education, science editing, ethnic policy for sustainable development, education sciences

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The UNESCO 2019 Forum on Education for Sustainable Development and Global Citizenship will be organized by the UNESCO, in cooperation with the Ministry of Education and Training (MOET) of Vietnam. This global and important event reflects the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals through policy and academic discussions and debates, which aim at education for the betterment of development sustainability and the mobility and success of future global citizenship.

As a contribution to the aforementioned UNESCO event, the Vietnam Minister of Education and Training, Prof. Dr. Phung Xuan Nha, takes the initiative in setting up a venue for publication of important policy and academic papers with the journal Sustainability.

On his behalf, the guest editors would like to invite scholars in different disciplines as well as policy-makers and practitioners from different walks of life to submit manuscripts to this Special Issue. We welcome topical discussions in the forms of research articles, review articles, essays, perspectives, which address such research areas as:

  • Global mobility and future citizens
  • The implications of UN SDGs and international and national-level education policy
  • The education-global citizen-social sustainability nexus
  • Regulatory frameworks and political agenda for better education and sustainable development
  • Lagging regions in education and sciences
  • Socio-economic inequality and the future of UN SDGs
  • Pre-school and K12 education goals, curricula and policies in compliance with UN SDGs
  • Higher education and research concerning natural and social sustainability and UN SDGs
  • Long-term impacts of pre-school, grade-school and tertiary education on strategic SDGs and inclusive growth
  • Education and science funding, and basic research in the developed world and the Global South
  • Impacts of social networks and technologies on societal education and future citizens
  • STI/STEM knowledge base and the betterment of education for future global citizenship
  • Lifelong learning for sustainable development

We sincerely believe that your contributions will help to improve the future agenda on addressing issues that hamper developmental sustainability, and on improving global citizenship through educational attainments in compliance with the UN SDGs.

Dr. Quan-Hoang Vuong
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Le Anh Vinh
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Tran Trung
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Global citizenship
  • UN SDGs
  • education policy
  • science-technology-innovation (STI), STEM
  • education-global
  • lifelong learning
  • citizenship-developmental sustainability
  • pre-school/K12/higher education
  • social networks and technologies
  • evidence-based policy making

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Reading Habits, Socioeconomic Conditions, Occupational Aspiration and Academic Achievement in Vietnamese Junior High School Students
Sustainability 2019, 11(18), 5113; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11185113 - 18 Sep 2019
Abstract
Reading practices play an important role in the learning process of students. Especially in a fast-changing world where knowledge about nature and society is in a constant state of flux, book reading helps students foster skills such as thinking, valuing, adaptability and creativity [...] Read more.
Reading practices play an important role in the learning process of students. Especially in a fast-changing world where knowledge about nature and society is in a constant state of flux, book reading helps students foster skills such as thinking, valuing, adaptability and creativity for sustainable development. This research study used a dataset of 1676 observations of junior high school students from Northern Vietnam to explore students’ academic achievement and its association with their reading passion, family socio economic condition, parental education and occupational aspiration. The empirical results show that higher grades in STEM-related subjects are predicted by reading interest (βReadbook = 0.425, p < 0.0001), with students who love reading books achieve higher score than those who take no interest in books. Remarkably, the education level of the mother strongly enhances academic performance, with β = 0.721 (p < 0.0001) in cases of mother having a university diploma or higher. Students coming from wealthy families are more likely to buy books whereas borrowing from the library is the main source of books for students who grow up in not-rich families. However, even among wealthy families, investment into buying books still rely more on personal interest, despite the aforementioned educational benefits of book reading, as evidenced by an over 7 percentage point disparity between the likelihood of purchasing books among wealthy-family students who took an interest in reading (45%) versus students of the same background who did not like to read (38.7%). The results present implications for education policy making with a vision towards United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal 4: Quality Education. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Relationship between Birth Order, Sex, Home Scholarly Culture and Youths’ Reading Practices in Promoting Lifelong Learning for Sustainable Development in Vietnam
Sustainability 2019, 11(16), 4389; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11164389 - 13 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Book reading is an important factor contributing to children’s cognitive development and education for sustainable development. However, in a developing country like Vietnam, statistics have reported a low figure in book reading: only 1.2 books a year. This research study used a dataset [...] Read more.
Book reading is an important factor contributing to children’s cognitive development and education for sustainable development. However, in a developing country like Vietnam, statistics have reported a low figure in book reading: only 1.2 books a year. This research study used a dataset of 1676 observations of junior high school students from Northern Vietnam to explore students’ reading behavior and its association with demographic factors, and the family’s reading culture. Data analysis suggests the older the student gets, the less inclined they are to read, and being female and having hobbies of low sensory stimulation are linked to higher preference for reading. Regarding scholarly culture at home, students who read more varied types of books and spend more time on books are correlated with higher reading interest. Reading habits are also positively reinforced by the capacity to access books and parental book reading. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Internationalization and Its Discontents: Help-Seeking Behaviors of Students in a Multicultural Environment Regarding Acculturative Stress and Depression
Sustainability 2019, 11(7), 1865; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11071865 - 28 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Stress and depression can be seen as the major obstacles for sustained education and attainment of foreign students, and in turn, the sustainability of an education system as a whole. However, the mainstream consideration following Berry’s model on acculturation does not take into [...] Read more.
Stress and depression can be seen as the major obstacles for sustained education and attainment of foreign students, and in turn, the sustainability of an education system as a whole. However, the mainstream consideration following Berry’s model on acculturation does not take into account whether students of the host countries are immune to these problems. This study aims to examine the prevalence and predictors of help-seeking behaviors among international and domestic students in a multicultural environment by employing ANOVA and polynomial regression. Some significant results from this study are: (1) Informal sources were the most prevalent sources of help-seeking among international and domestic students, while formal help-seeking was not popular; (2) international students were more likely to overcome emotional difficulties alone and seek help on the Internet than domestic students; (3) acculturative stress was a positive predictor of formal, informal, and miscellaneous help-seeking behaviors among international students and informal help-seeking behaviors or among domestic students; and (4) depression was negatively correlated with the willingness of international students to seek help from informal sources. The findings hint at the risk of acculturative stress faced by domestic students in a multicultural environment being overlooked and the lack of help-seeking sources for international students. The study also provides empirical evidence for policy-planners to design a sustainable education system better at supporting students dealing with depression and acculturative stress. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Toward Sustainable Overseas Mobility of Vietnamese Students: Understanding Determinants of Attitudinal and Behavioral Loyalty in Students of Higher Education
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 383; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020383 - 14 Jan 2019
Abstract
Research on internationalization in higher education has not shed enough light on how cross-border student mobility might contribute to the issue of sustainability. Given that a sustainable movement of loyal international students could help sustain the financial income, ranking, and prospective human resources [...] Read more.
Research on internationalization in higher education has not shed enough light on how cross-border student mobility might contribute to the issue of sustainability. Given that a sustainable movement of loyal international students could help sustain the financial income, ranking, and prospective human resources of the host universities and countries, this study aims to investigate the mechanisms that lead to such loyalty. Specifically, this study adds to the literature by examining how switching cost interacts with disconfirmation and satisfaction in generating attitudinal and behavioral loyalty among international students. The study, surveying 410 Vietnamese students who are studying at either at the undergraduate or graduate level in 15 countries across the globe, first adopts confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using software SAS 9.3 to evaluate if multiple fit indices, the standardized factor loading, and the average variance extracted scores are satisfactory. It then employs the Structural Equation Model (SEM) to test five hypotheses concerning the interaction between disconfirmation and satisfaction as well as among satisfaction, switching cost and behavioral/attitudinal loyalty. The results find that disconfirmation has both direct and indirect impact, while satisfaction only has a direct impact on attitudinal loyalty. Meanwhile, switching cost is found to have a direct impact on behavioral loyalty, but not on attitudinal loyalty. Based on these findings, the study proposes some theoretical and managerial implications for sustainability in general and sustainability of higher education in particular as well as direction for future studies. Full article
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