Special Issue "Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Dimitris Potoglou
Website
Guest Editor
School of Geography and Planning, Cardiff University, Wales, UK
Interests: analysis of travel behaviour; sustainable and active travel; car ownership; environmental impacts of transport; privacy and security

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This is a call for papers to be considered for a special issue entitled “Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future” in the journal Sustainability.

Emerging data sources, vehicle technologies, mobility services, and autonomous vehicles constitute key dimensions of how travel will be analysed, experienced, and impact our everyday lives and those of future generations. New research questions emerge around how to compile, store, and analyse these data to better understand travel behaviour and its environmental, social, and economic impacts. New vehicle technologies and mobility services raise questions around their regulatory and operational frameworks, potential market share, and purpose of use (e.g., commute vs. leisure). Most importantly, new vehicle technologies and mobility services are expected to have notable implications for cleaner, more efficient, safer, and equitable travel.

We aim to publish high-quality research articles on topics related, but not limited to:

  • Challenges and opportunities in the analysis of travel behaviour in the era of new data sources
  • Conceptual pieces on the assessment of environmental, social, and economic implications as a result of travel behaviour
  • Empirical work on the interrelation between travel behaviour and environmental, social, and economic impacts
  • Future scenario analysis considering the potential uptake of cleaner vehicles or travel services (or both)
  • Approaches for the integrated assessment of travel behaviour, emissions, air quality, and energy consumption

Dr. Dimitris Potoglou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • travel behaviour analysis
  • sustainable transport
  • cleaner cars
  • big data
  • appraisal
  • life-cycle assessment
  • mobility as a service
  • vehicle emissions
  • air quality
  • energy consumption

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Knowledge and Persuasion on the Decision to Adopt or Reject Alternative Fuel Vehicles
Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 2997; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10092997 - 23 Aug 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
Alternative fuel vehicles, such as battery electric vehicles and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, support the imperative to decarbonise the transport sector, but are not yet at a stage in their development where they can successfully compete with conventional fuel vehicles. This paper examines [...] Read more.
Alternative fuel vehicles, such as battery electric vehicles and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, support the imperative to decarbonise the transport sector, but are not yet at a stage in their development where they can successfully compete with conventional fuel vehicles. This paper examines the influence of knowledge and persuasion on the decision to adopt or reject alternative fuel vehicles, a novel and original application of Rogers’ Theory of Diffusion of Innovations. A household questionnaire survey was undertaken with respondents in the Sutton Coldfield suburb of the United Kingdom city of Birmingham. This suburb was previously identified as having a strong spatial cluster of potential early adopters of alternative fuel vehicles. The survey results provide some useful empirical insights around the issues pertaining to the wider adoption of alternative fuel vehicles, even though the data is a bit dated as the survey was conducted in 2013. It is confirmed that respondents have limited knowledge of alternative fuel vehicles and perceptions have led to the development of negative attitudes towards them. The reasons largely relate to three problems: purchase price, limited range and poor infrastructure availability. Most respondents passively rejected alternative fuel vehicles, which confirms that a concerted effort is required to inform the general public about the benefits alternative fuel vehicles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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Open AccessArticle
Stochastic Electric Vehicle Network Considering Environmental Costs
Sustainability 2018, 10(8), 2888; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082888 - 14 Aug 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
In recent years, many countries have published their timetables to promote electric vehicles. Many researches have focused on the benefits of electric vehicles. Compared with gas vehicles, electric vehicles are more suitable for modern cities, because they are considered to be environment-friendly by [...] Read more.
In recent years, many countries have published their timetables to promote electric vehicles. Many researches have focused on the benefits of electric vehicles. Compared with gas vehicles, electric vehicles are more suitable for modern cities, because they are considered to be environment-friendly by the public. Hence we pay attention to the environmental costs of electric vehicles. In this paper, an electric vehicle network is established. To analyze this electric vehicle network, we define environmental costs for the network and propose a stochastic user equilibrium model to describe drivers’ route choice behavior. An algorithm is proposed to solve this model. The model and the algorithm are illustrated through a numerical example. We test the calculation feasibility of the proposed model and the computational efficiency of the proposed algorithm via this numerical example. A comparative analysis is conducted to show the benefits of introducing electric vehicles into traffic networks. With the sensitivity analysis, we also reveal the relationship between people’s environmental awareness, the quantity of electric vehicles and the environmental costs of the overall traffic network. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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Open AccessArticle
Study on Measurement of Green Productivity of Tourism in the Yangtze River Economic Zone, China
Sustainability 2018, 10(8), 2786; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082786 - 07 Aug 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper introduces energy consumption and carbon emission into the analysis framework of the green productivity of tourism. By comparing and analyzing the two main methods used to evaluate the energy consumption and carbon emission estimations of tourism, namely, the “top-down” and “bottom-up” [...] Read more.
This paper introduces energy consumption and carbon emission into the analysis framework of the green productivity of tourism. By comparing and analyzing the two main methods used to evaluate the energy consumption and carbon emission estimations of tourism, namely, the “top-down” and “bottom-up” method, and considering the availability of data, the “bottom-up” method was adopted to evaluate the energy consumption and carbon emissions of tourism in the Yangtze River Economic Zone (YREZ). Then, using the Malmquist-Luenberger (ML) index in the super-efficiency data envelopment analysis (DEA) model, the green productivity of the tourism in 11 provinces and cities in the YREZ from 2006 to 2015 was measured. The empirical results show that: (1) The energy consumption and carbon emissions of tourism in the YREZ have increased steadily over the past 10 years, which has caused a certain degree of pollution to the environment, indicating that tourism is no longer a “smoke-free industry”; (2) there are significant provincial differences between the energy consumption and carbon emissions of tourism in the YREZ, with Shanghai always ranking first, while Guizhou and Yunnan ranks last, which represents that the tourism economic development level is positively correlated with the tourism energy consumption and carbon emissions; (3) the green productivity of tourism in the YREZ shows a fluctuating increasing trend in the past 10 years, and technological progress has become the main reason for its growth in green productivity; and (4) the green productivity of tourism in 11 provinces and cities in the YREZ can be divided into three types: Progressive type of tourism green development, stagnant type of tourism green development, and declining type of tourism green development. Consequently, different types of provinces should explore effective dependency paths based on their own conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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Open AccessArticle
Examining the Relationship between Household Vehicle Ownership and Ridesharing Behaviors in the United States
Sustainability 2018, 10(8), 2720; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082720 - 02 Aug 2018
Cited by 9
Abstract
To improve the sustainability and efficiency of transport systems, communities and government agencies throughout the United States (US) are looking for ways to reduce vehicle ownership and single-occupant trips by encouraging people to shift from driving to using more sustainable transport modes (such [...] Read more.
To improve the sustainability and efficiency of transport systems, communities and government agencies throughout the United States (US) are looking for ways to reduce vehicle ownership and single-occupant trips by encouraging people to shift from driving to using more sustainable transport modes (such as ridesharing). Ridesharing is a cost-effective, sustainable and effective alternative transportation mode that is beneficial to the environment, the economy and society. Despite the potential effect of vehicle ownership on the adoption of ridesharing services, individuals’ ridesharing behaviors and the interdependencies between vehicle ownership and ridesharing usage are not well understood. This study aims to fill the gap by examining the associations between household vehicle ownership and the frequency and probability of ridesharing usage, and to estimate the effects of household vehicle ownership on individuals’ ridesharing usage in the US. We conducted zero-inflated negative binomial regression models using data from the 2017 National Household Travel Survey. The results show that, in general, one-vehicle reduction in households was significantly associated with a 7.9% increase in the frequency of ridesharing usage and a 23.0% increase in the probability of ridesharing usage. The effects of household vehicle ownership on the frequency of ridesharing usage are greater for those who live in areas with a higher population density than those living in areas with a lower population density. Young people, men, those who are unable to drive, individuals with high household income levels, and those who live in areas with rail service or a higher population density, tend to use ridesharing more frequently and are more likely to use it. These findings can be used as guides for planners or practitioners to better understand individuals’ ridesharing behaviors, and to identify policies and interventions to increase the potential of ridesharing usage, and to decrease household vehicle ownership, depending on different contextual features and demographic variables. Comprehensive strategies that limit vehicle ownership and address the increasing demand for ridesharing have the potential to improve the sustainability of transportation systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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Open AccessArticle
Engaging in Pro-Environment Travel Behaviour Research from a Psycho-Social Perspective: A Review of Behavioural Variables and Theories
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2412; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072412 - 11 Jul 2018
Cited by 9
Abstract
This paper aims to review variables and behavioural theories originating from social and environmental psychology as applied to transport research, to better understand decision-making mechanisms, information processing and modal choice. The first section provides an overview of the main psycho-social variables which explain [...] Read more.
This paper aims to review variables and behavioural theories originating from social and environmental psychology as applied to transport research, to better understand decision-making mechanisms, information processing and modal choice. The first section provides an overview of the main psycho-social variables which explain behaviour and, notably, pro-environment behaviour. The analysis shows the relations among variables, highlighting some potential cause-effect mechanism or, at least, the influence that such variables can have on behaviour. Furthermore, the strengths and weaknesses of using psycho-social variables to predict travel behaviour are discussed. Such analysis feeds the section related to the behavioural theories. These are reviewed with a focus on potential application to transport sector, showing the would-be added value of introducing a socio-psychological approach in the current vision, focused on stochastic models based on maximisation of personal utility. To this end, attention is paid to the data collection and analysis, basic for any models and even more challenging to collect when they deal with personal characteristics of individuals. Finally, the concept of attitude and intention is discussed, opening the doors between disciplines to overcome the attitude-behaviour gap. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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Open AccessArticle
Driving Behaviour Style Study with a Hybrid Deep Learning Framework Based on GPS Data
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2351; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072351 - 06 Jul 2018
Cited by 17
Abstract
Innovative technologies and traffic data sources provide great potential to extend advanced strategies and methods in travel behaviour research. Considering the increasing availability of real-time vehicle trajectory data and stimulated by the advances in the modelling and analysis of big data, this paper [...] Read more.
Innovative technologies and traffic data sources provide great potential to extend advanced strategies and methods in travel behaviour research. Considering the increasing availability of real-time vehicle trajectory data and stimulated by the advances in the modelling and analysis of big data, this paper developed a hybrid unsupervised deep learning model to study driving bahaviour and risk patterns. The approach combines Autoencoder and Self-organized Maps (AESOM), to extract latent features and classify driving behaviour. The specialized neural networks are applied to data from 4032 observations collected from Global Positioning System (GPS) sensors in Shenzhen, China. In two case studies, improper vehicle lateral position maintenance, speeding and inconsistent or excessive acceleration and deceleration have been identified. The experiments have shown that back propagation through multi-layer autoencoders is effective for non-linear and multi-modal dimensionality reduction, giving low reconstruction errors from big GPS datasets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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Open AccessArticle
Sustainability of the Urban Transport System under Changes in Weather and Road Conditions Affecting Vehicle Operation
Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 2052; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10062052 - 16 Jun 2018
Cited by 10
Abstract
The paper suggests a methodological approach for assessing the sustainability of the urban transport system. Parameters were selected for assessing the sustainability of the transport system and significant factors affecting sustainability were determined. Parameters of the sustainability of the system when changes in [...] Read more.
The paper suggests a methodological approach for assessing the sustainability of the urban transport system. Parameters were selected for assessing the sustainability of the transport system and significant factors affecting sustainability were determined. Parameters of the sustainability of the system when changes in the weather and road conditions affect vehicle operation were estimated on the basis of the simulation modeling. An integral indicator of sustainability was introduced to evaluate the sustainability of the transport flow management subsystem and the methodological approach to its calculation was substantiated. The results from changing the parameters of the traffic flow were demonstrated in the case of a significant amount of precipitation and the constraints put on the movement of vehicles on the road infrastructure unit due to snow-removal operations and road traffic accidents. Also, the parameters of road traffic under the reconstruction of the main street of regulated traffic into a street of uninterrupted traffic were presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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Open AccessArticle
Measurement and Spatial Differentiation Characteristics of Transit Equity: A Case Study of Guangzhou, China
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 1069; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041069 - 03 Apr 2018
Cited by 8
Abstract
Urban public transit is an important solution for narrowing the mobility gap between captive riders and choice riders and to address issues of social equity. An equitable transit system essentially could meet the needs of transit dependents and maximize the scope of public [...] Read more.
Urban public transit is an important solution for narrowing the mobility gap between captive riders and choice riders and to address issues of social equity. An equitable transit system essentially could meet the needs of transit dependents and maximize the scope of public transit services. To acquire a better understanding of transit equity, we use Lorenz curves and the GINI coefficient to measure the relative supply of public transit to the population and employ the spatial overlay method to analyze the matching degree of transit supply and demand in Guangzhou, China. The findings show that there are obvious and unequal differences between the levels of transit service in the internal zones. The spatial coverage rate and number of stop services of the outer city are significantly less than that of the inner and middle city. Eighty percent of the population shares only 36.7% of the public transit supply in Guangzhou. Most communities of low-supply and high-need public transit are distributed contiguously in the eastern Baiyun and southern Huadu districts. This distribution pattern is beneficial to the transit agency, which could improve the supply in these areas to avoid the risk caused when a large number of residents lack access to public transit services. The results could serve as an excellent foundation for planning the handling of spatial gaps in the Guangzhou public transit supply. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effects of Land-Use Patterns on Home-Based Tour Complexity and Total Distances Traveled: A Path Analysis
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 830; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030830 - 15 Mar 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
This work studies the relationships between the number of complex tours (with one or more intermediate stops) and simple home-based tours, total distances traveled by mode, and land-use patterns both at the residence and at the workplace using path analysis. The model includes [...] Read more.
This work studies the relationships between the number of complex tours (with one or more intermediate stops) and simple home-based tours, total distances traveled by mode, and land-use patterns both at the residence and at the workplace using path analysis. The model includes commuting distance, car ownership and motorcycle ownership, which are intermediate variables in the relationship between land use, tour complexity and distances traveled by mode. The dataset used here was collected in a region comprising four municipalities located in the north of Portugal that are made up of urban areas, their sprawling suburbs, and surrounding rural hinterland. The results confirm the association between complex tours and higher levels of car use. Land-use patterns significantly affect travelled distances by mode either directly and indirectly via the influence of longer-term decisions like vehicle ownership and commuting distance. The results obtained highlight the role of socioeconomic variables in influencing tour complexity; in particular, households with children, household income, and workers with a college degree tend to do more complex tours. Land-use patterns mediate the effects of tour complexity on the kilometers travelled by different modes. Increasing densities in central areas, and particularly the concentration of jobs, have relevant benefits by reducing car kilometers driven. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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Open AccessArticle
Optimal Coordination Strategy for an Integrated Multimodal Transit Feeder Network Design Considering Multiple Objectives
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 734; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030734 - 07 Mar 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
Public transportation can have an efficient role ingainingtraveler satisfaction while decreasing operation costs through establishing an integrated public transit system. The main objective of this research is to propose an integrated multimodal transit model to design the best combination of both railway and [...] Read more.
Public transportation can have an efficient role ingainingtraveler satisfaction while decreasing operation costs through establishing an integrated public transit system. The main objective of this research is to propose an integrated multimodal transit model to design the best combination of both railway and feeder bus mode transit systems, while minimizing total cost. In this paper, we have proposed a strategy for designing transit networks that provide multimodal services at each stop, and for consecutively assigning optimum demand to the different feeder modes. Optimum transit networks have been achieved using single and multi-objective approaches via metaheuristic optimization algorithms, such as simulated annealing, genetic algorithms, and the Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II). The used input data and study area were based on the real transit network of Petaling Jaya, located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Numerical results of the presented model, containing the statistical results, the optimum demand ratio, optimal solution, convergence rate, and comparisons among best solutions have been discussed in detail. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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Open AccessArticle
Green Driver: Travel Behaviors Revisited on Fuel Saving and Less Emission
Sustainability 2018, 10(2), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10020325 - 26 Jan 2018
Cited by 13
Abstract
Road transportation is the main energy consumer and major contributor of ever-increasing hazardous emissions. Transportation professionals have raised the idea of applying the green concept in various areas of transportation, including green highways, green vehicles and transit-oriented designs, to tackle the negative impact [...] Read more.
Road transportation is the main energy consumer and major contributor of ever-increasing hazardous emissions. Transportation professionals have raised the idea of applying the green concept in various areas of transportation, including green highways, green vehicles and transit-oriented designs, to tackle the negative impact of road transportation. This research generated a new dimension called the green driver to remediate urgently the existing driving assessment models that have intensified emissions and energy consumption. In this regard, this study aimed to establish the green driver’s behaviors related to fuel saving and emission reduction. The study has two phases. Phase one involves investigating the driving behaviors influencing fuel saving and emission reduction through a systematic literature review and content analysis, which identified twenty-one variables classified into four clusters. These clusters included the following: (i) FEf1, which is driving style; (ii) FEf2, which is driving behavior associated with vehicle transmission; (iii) FEf3, which is driving behavior associated with road design and traffic rules; and (iv) FEf4, which is driving behavior associated with vehicle operational characteristics. The second phase involves validating phase one findings by applying the Grounded Group Decision Making (GGDM) method. The results of GGDM have established seventeen green driving behaviors. The study conducted the Green Value (GV) analysis for each green behavior on fuel saving and emission reduction. The study found that aggressive driving (GV = 0.16) interferes with the association between fuel consumption, emission and driver’s personalities. The research concludes that driver’s personalities (including physical, psychological and psychosocial characteristics) have to be integrated for advanced in-vehicle driver assistance system and particularly, for green driving accreditation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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Open AccessArticle
Cycling as a Smart and Green Mode of Transport in Small Touristic Cities
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 268; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010268 - 20 Jan 2018
Cited by 19
Abstract
Cycling as a mode of transport is a low-cost, health-improving way to travel and offers environmental benefits for the cities that promote it. It is only recently, though, with concerns over climate change, pollution, congestion, and obesity among others, that have cities throughout [...] Read more.
Cycling as a mode of transport is a low-cost, health-improving way to travel and offers environmental benefits for the cities that promote it. It is only recently, though, with concerns over climate change, pollution, congestion, and obesity among others, that have cities throughout the world have begun to implement policies to promote cycling. In Greece, however, the use of the bicycle is limited. In Preveza, a small touristic city in Northwestern Greece where the use of the bicycle is prominent when compared to other Greek cities, there are efforts to promote cycling. Through the aid of a structured questionnaire, the residents evaluated the suitability of the city for cycling, the existing infrastructure, appropriate education, and behavior of cyclists and drivers. More than half of the residents use bicycles as their transportation and stated that bicycles are an inexpensive way of transport in the city and had the opinion that the state should encourage bicycle use by supporting subvention in bicycle acquisition. Two-thirds of the residents evaluated the cycling facilities of their city as adequate, but unsafe for young cyclists who do not follow the rules of transport. Adult cyclists, in contrast, were more loyal to the code, but stated that drivers did not respect their presence on the roads. This research provides important information on the perceived shortcomings of cycling as a transport mode in Preveza that may be of interest to towns/cities with similar characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Persuasive Technologies for Sustainable Mobility: State of the Art and Emerging Trends
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2128; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072128 - 22 Jun 2018
Cited by 20
Abstract
In recent years, persuasive interventions for inducing sustainable mobility behaviours have become an active research field. This review paper systematically analyses existing approaches and prototype systems as well as field studies and describes and classifies the persuasive strategies used for changing behaviours in [...] Read more.
In recent years, persuasive interventions for inducing sustainable mobility behaviours have become an active research field. This review paper systematically analyses existing approaches and prototype systems as well as field studies and describes and classifies the persuasive strategies used for changing behaviours in the domain of mobility and transport. We provide a review of 44 papers on persuasive technology for sustainable transportation aiming to (i) answer important questions regarding the effectiveness of persuasive technology for changing mobility behaviours, (ii) summarize and highlight trends in the technology design, research methods, strategies and theories, (iii) uncover limitations of existing approaches and applications, and (iv) suggest directions for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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Open AccessReview
Factors Preventing the Use of Alternative Transport Modes to the Car in Later Life
Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 1982; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10061982 - 13 Jun 2018
Cited by 13
Abstract
Recent research related to transport gerontology argues that the autonomy, flexibility and independence provided by the car are fundamental in fulfilling travel needs in later life. Statistics show that in the western world the car is the most used mode of travel among [...] Read more.
Recent research related to transport gerontology argues that the autonomy, flexibility and independence provided by the car are fundamental in fulfilling travel needs in later life. Statistics show that in the western world the car is the most used mode of travel among the older population. Despite the importance of promoting transport policies to incentivize people to switch to more sustainable forms of transportation, alternatives to the car are still underused by older people. The aim of this scoping review is to analyze the transport barriers affecting the use of alternative modes to the car in later life. The paper investigates how issues related to personal security, health impairments, service provision, affordability, comfort, attitude, built environment, information and awareness of all transport modes influence modal choice. The analysis of the literature shows that despite the benefits provided by public transport, flexible transport services, taxis, walking and cycling, there are still several factors that negatively affect the use of these modes. The paper concludes by reflecting on potential solutions that might help to create a transport system less reliant on the car and which is able to meet the mobility needs of the older population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Travel Behaviour and Sustainable Transport of the Future)
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