Special Issue "Dealing with Environmental Conflicts"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ioan-Cristian Iojă
Website
Guest Editor
Center for Environmental Researches and Impact Studies, University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania
Interests: environmental geography; urban ecology; environmental conflict
Prof. Dr. Jürgen H. Breuste
Website
Guest Editor
Chair Urban and Landscape Ecology, Department of Geography and Geology, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr. 34, A 5020 Salzburg, Austria
Interests: urban ecology; urban nature protection; urban ecosystem management; urban ecosystem services; urban biodiversity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Mihai Razvan Nita
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Center for Environmental Researches and Impact Studies, University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania
Interests: Nature-based solutions; green infrastructures; ecosystem services assessment; urban and territorial planning; environmental conflicts

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The journal Sustainability, an international, cross-disciplinary, scholarly, and open access journal of environmental, cultural, economic, and social sustainability of human beings invites your submission for a Special Issue on “Dealing with Environmental Conflicts”.

Conflict seems to be an inevitable part of our society, which can be addressed from a social, political, economic, psychological or environmental perspective. The resolution of conflict is an important step toward achieving sustainability in our society.

Although they have many similarities with social and political conflicts, environmental conflicts have specific features, related with triggering events, progress, consequences, involvement of the stakeholders, management or resolution processes. Political settings (e.g., Sustainability Development Goals and other international environmental agreements), new societal ambitions (e.g., nature-based solutions, urban protected areas), environmental threats (environmental pollution, invasive species, climate change, environmental risks) and others (e.g., public participation in decision making process) increase the potential to have contradiction between different groups at global, regional, and local level.

This Special Issue calls for contributions that address how we can better understand environmental conflict management and resolution. Contributors have to consider the global, regional, and local scale related with environmental conflicts, and they are welcome to examine the drivers and/or propose concrete solutions for their resolution.

Of particular interest are papers that (i) point out the conflictual dimension of different new societal projects (e.g., natural protected areas, green infrastructure); (ii) present local and regional experience related with environmental conflicts, (iii) propose different innovative methods to understand environmental conflicts; (iv) demonstrate solutions that are scalable, transferable, and/or can be tailored to specific local or issue-dependent needs in their implementation, and (v) provide a better understanding of social and economic dimension of environmental conflicts.

Papers are expected to represent sustainability research across a wide range of disciplines, as well as inter- and transdisciplinary studies. While innovative ideas and strategies are welcome, authors are encouraged to consider their feasibility in light of the current broader background.

The Special Issue will be connected with the 10th anniversary of Society for Urban Ecology -SURE conference The Challenging Urban Nature and Nature's Role in Urban Challenges, which will take place in 5–8 September 2019 at the University of Bucharest (Romania) (https://ccmesi.ro/?page_id=1216). The conference proposes the following topics related with the Special Issue: Challenges for nature-based solutions applications in our cities; planning for eco, smart, resilient, and sustainable cities; and the great green divide—conflicts involving green and protected areas.

References:

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  • Torre, A. (2010). Conflits environnementaux et territoires. In B. Zuindeau (Ed.), Développement durable et territoire (pp. 518): Presses Universitaires du Septentrion.
  • Torre, A., Aznar, O., Bonin, M., Caron, A., Chia, E., Galman, M., Lefranc, C., Melot, R., Guerin, M., Jeanneaux, P., Kirat, T., Paoli, J. C., Salazar, M. I., & Thinon, P. (2006). Conflits et tensions autour des usages de l’espace dans les territoires ruraux et périurbains. Le cas de six zones géographiques françaises. Revue d’Économie Régionale & Urbaine, 3, 411-450.
  • Torre, A., Melot, R., Magsi, H., Bossuet, L., Cadoret, A., Caron, A., Darly, S., Jeanneaux, P., Kirat, T., Pham, H. V., & Kolokouris, O. (2014). Identifying and measuring land-use and proximity conflicts: methods and identification. SpringerPlus, 3, 85.
  • Troja, M. (2003). Resolving Environmental Conflicts. Mediation and Negotiation as Institutional Capacities for Social Learning. In H. Breit, A. Engels, T. Moss & M. Troja (Eds.), How Institutions Change (pp. 233-267): VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften.
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Prof. Dr. Ioan-Cristian Iojă
Prof. Dr. Jurgen Breuste
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Mihai Razvan Nita
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Environmental conflicts
  • Conflict resolution
  • Nature based-solutions
  • Sustainability

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Too Old for Recreation? How Friendly Are Urban Parks for Elderly People?
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 790; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030790 - 21 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Urbanization and ageing are the two main processes currently shaping the social environment worldwide. In this context, creating senior friendly cities should be an important target, especially in developed countries, which have the highest rates of population over 60 years old. Our study [...] Read more.
Urbanization and ageing are the two main processes currently shaping the social environment worldwide. In this context, creating senior friendly cities should be an important target, especially in developed countries, which have the highest rates of population over 60 years old. Our study focuses on the use of urban parks and aims to analyze how friendly their planning, design, and use are for elderly people. We used field observation carried out in four case study parks in Bucharest (Romania) to assess the spatial planning and design of urban parks, and to identify the environmental problems. We applied a total of 5752 questionnaires (16% to elderly people) in the majority of Bucharest’s parks in order to analyze the behavior and perception of seniors in contrast with that of the general population. The analysis highlighted the lack of endowments especially planned or designed for seniors and the multiple problems deriving from their interaction with other visitor groups which make them feel disrespected or unsafe. Our study highlights the need for including the needs, demands, and desires of elderly people in decision making processes, with the aim of creating inclusive and senior friendly parks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Outdoor Recreation Participation in Istanbul, Turkey: An Investigation of Frequency, Length, Travel Time and Activities
Sustainability 2020, 12(2), 741; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12020741 - 20 Jan 2020
Abstract
Although outdoor recreation participation has been studied extensively, little research has come from less developed regions of the world. This paper examined outdoor recreation participation and its predictors in Istanbul, an increasingly urbanized and populated megacity, in Turkey. The results show that nearly [...] Read more.
Although outdoor recreation participation has been studied extensively, little research has come from less developed regions of the world. This paper examined outdoor recreation participation and its predictors in Istanbul, an increasingly urbanized and populated megacity, in Turkey. The results show that nearly half of the people interviewed in this study had claimed to visit a nature area at least once a week or more often, nearly three-quarters invested a travel time to these areas of between 30 min to 2 h, about two-thirds spent more than 2 h at the area, and about one-third was engaged in leisurely walking. The frequency of visits was almost the single predictor of travel time. Visit frequencies were predicted by the travel time and visit length. Activity type and traveling longer than 2 h predicted the length of visits. Recreational activity type was predicted by visit length and travel time. Socio-demographic variables were associated with only a few outdoor participation variables. The findings imply that the residents have limited contact with nature and limited opportunity to benefit from such interaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Fuzzy Techniques for Artificial Snow Cover Optimization in the Ski Areas. Case Study: Obârșia Lotrului (Southern Carpathians, Romania)
Sustainability 2020, 12(2), 632; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12020632 - 15 Jan 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper focuses on the environmental conflicts induced by insufficient continuous snow cover on the ski areas in Romania. The case study aims envisions the area of Southern Carpathians, Latoriței Mountains, belonging to the group of Parâng Mountains. The area chosen to develop [...] Read more.
This paper focuses on the environmental conflicts induced by insufficient continuous snow cover on the ski areas in Romania. The case study aims envisions the area of Southern Carpathians, Latoriței Mountains, belonging to the group of Parâng Mountains. The area chosen to develop and improve the artificial snow system was conducted for in the proposed ski area, Obârşia Lotrului. This fulfilled a necessary condition (geomorphological and climatic) for the development of the ski domain. The methodology focuses on two main stages phases. In the first stage phase, based on the GIS, the areas that have shown problems in terms of continuity of the snow layer and its thickness were identified, while the second phase, there is a supposed optimization based on Fuzzy logic for the installation of artificial snow. The corresponding thickness of snow for a longer period of time can lead to a higher socio-economic efficiency, as well as the increase of the use duration of the respective ski area, and also a prevention mechanism to environmental conflicts that may arise. The proposed study supports civil society by optimizing artificial snow machines through a positive impact on water resources allocated to a ski area in order to maintain a continuous snow cover. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Insect Habitat Systems Integrated into Façades-Impact on Building Physics and Awareness of Society
Sustainability 2020, 12(2), 570; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12020570 - 11 Jan 2020
Abstract
Deforestation, intensive farming and the sealing of green spaces are considered to be the main reasons for the global decrease of biodiversity. In this context, the built environment, and in particular vertical surfaces, are still highly underestimated and need to be taken into [...] Read more.
Deforestation, intensive farming and the sealing of green spaces are considered to be the main reasons for the global decrease of biodiversity. In this context, the built environment, and in particular vertical surfaces, are still highly underestimated and need to be taken into account. Although it is acknowledged that greened surfaces have beneficial effects, for example, on the microclimate, the vast majority of buildings are still not biodiversity-friendly. Artificial nesting boxes help birds and bats adapt to the change of their habitats. However, insects, with their tremendous significance for insectivorous species and for humans, are mostly neglected or even threatened. The purpose of this holistic approach is to investigate interactions between integrated insect habitat systems in façades and building physical aspects to create test objects. Heat transfer coefficients, thermal bridges, and the risk of condensation inside the buildings were simulated in different arrangements of nesting boxes for wild bees. As a result, conclusions on heat and humidity protection in ventilated façades and external thermal insulation composite systems could be drawn. The following results showed the maintenance of indoor comfort and energy efficiency as well as a low risk of mold. Further investigations analyzed the sound reduction index and fire protection. From a building physical point of view, integrated insect habitat systems could be part of the constructed environment and even link inner-city biotopes. Further challenges and opportunities are identified rather at a socio-ecological and technical level. Without taking into account the civil society and ecological demands of the various species, habitat systems for insects will miss their objectives. Special focus will be put on the skepticism and lack of knowledge of people, as well as on the comfort of the insects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessing the Potential Conflict Occurrence Due to Metropolitan Transportation Planning: A Proposed Quantitative Approach
Sustainability 2020, 12(2), 527; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12020527 - 10 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Large urban settlements are being organized in metropolitan areas, with a polarizing city influencing and shaping the landscape of the hinterland. Transport infrastructure networks are the main vectors for the permanent flux of resources, and these exchanges should be maintained undisturbed. A poor [...] Read more.
Large urban settlements are being organized in metropolitan areas, with a polarizing city influencing and shaping the landscape of the hinterland. Transport infrastructure networks are the main vectors for the permanent flux of resources, and these exchanges should be maintained undisturbed. A poor transportation network impedes the continuity of these flows, causing unsatisfaction, ultimately generating planning-based conflicts within metropolitan zones. This study aims in assessing the potential occurrence of metropolitan conflicts generated by the transportation network design. We used a quantitative approach based on a set of new proposed indexes. The methods were applied on nine metropolitan zones from Romania. The results show that each metropolitan zone has specific potential for conflict occurrence. The higher potential was recorded within the more recent established metropolitan zones. Our results raise the question on whether the Romanian metropolitan zones are fully functional and worthy of this status. The study provides a useful and usable tool in assessing the effectiveness of the transportation networks within metropolitan areas, establishing the potential conflict occurrence and it provides interesting insights about the metropolitan transportation issues, raising red flags toward local and regional decision makers and planners. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Pathways of Conflict: Lessons from the Cultivation of MON810 in Germany in 2005–2008 for Emerging Conflicts over New Breeding Techniques
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010144 - 23 Dec 2019
Abstract
The paper uses qualitative interviews and document analysis to examine conflicts over plant and animal breeding techniques from the perspectives of Social and Political Ecology. It asks how past conflicts over genetically modified organisms (GMOs) can inform understandings of possible trajectories of emerging [...] Read more.
The paper uses qualitative interviews and document analysis to examine conflicts over plant and animal breeding techniques from the perspectives of Social and Political Ecology. It asks how past conflicts over genetically modified organisms (GMOs) can inform understandings of possible trajectories of emerging conflicts over new breeding techniques (NBTs) such as CRISPR/Cas genome editing. Case studies of conflicts in three areas where the transgenic maize MON810 was cultivated in Germany from 2005–2008 show that the escalation of conflict coincided with the first tangible presence of these already controversial organisms in the rural landscape. Location-specific interlinkages between discursive and material dimensions gave rise to different pathways of conflict in the three areas studied. These empirical results inform the analysis of emerging conflicts over NBTs in Germany and the United Kingdom. The future of NBTs in both countries is still open, and the divergence of regulatory frameworks in Europe could lead to the development of ‘NBT hotspots’ located in particular European countries, provoking an escalation of conflict in areas where commercial application takes place. The paper concludes by examining the potential for a politicization of future conflicts to encompass wider issues related to the transformation of agricultural systems towards sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
Open AccessArticle
Specificity of Sustainable Structural Dynamics of Local Economy in Romanian Tourist Resorts
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 7155; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11247155 - 13 Dec 2019
Cited by 17
Abstract
The lack of sustainable development strategies of the tourist resorts from Romania caused the structural dynamics of their economy to record large fluctuations under the impact of determinants with unpredictable developments. The spectacular dynamics have led to developments difficult to predict, in many [...] Read more.
The lack of sustainable development strategies of the tourist resorts from Romania caused the structural dynamics of their economy to record large fluctuations under the impact of determinants with unpredictable developments. The spectacular dynamics have led to developments difficult to predict, in many situations that generate environmental conflicts, where the economic pressure has exceeded the support capacity of the natural environment. In this study, we aim to analyze the dynamic relationship between tourism and the other components of the economy, from each resort from Romania. The significant growth of tourism in recent years requires new approaches, relevant for understanding the role of tourism in increasing the complexity of the local economy. Measuring the role of tourism in the development of local economy was achieved by building an economic database for all tourist resorts from Romania (according to Government Decision No. 107 of 2018), at the four-digit NACE code level (Classification of National Economy Activities), for the economic indicators considered relevant: number of companies, number of employees, and turnover and profit, for the period 2000–2016, as well as at territorial administrative unit level. Detailed analyses revealed very different structural dynamics, the spectacular dynamics, lacking a coherent strategic framework, led in all situations to the emergence of environmental conflicts. Tourist resorts in which tourism has become an essential component of economic development have based their development on capitalization of local resources, which led to multiplication effects, materialized in a spectacular evolution of the local economy, and an increasing pressure on the natural environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Dispute Resolution and Collaborative Decision-Making: What Accounts for Their Effectiveness? The Case of Romania
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 7072; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11247072 - 10 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Collaborative dispute resolution is essential in natural resource management in the process of negotiating solutions to environmental issues. Our study aims to look at the factors which appear to contribute to the effectiveness of collaborative problem-solving efforts in case studies of environmental conflicts [...] Read more.
Collaborative dispute resolution is essential in natural resource management in the process of negotiating solutions to environmental issues. Our study aims to look at the factors which appear to contribute to the effectiveness of collaborative problem-solving efforts in case studies of environmental conflicts in Romania. The selected case studies illustrate conflicts over the management of natural resources, human-wildlife conflicts, as well as conflicts between development and conservation. A framework for collaborative governance and the multi-value qualitative comparative analysis (mvQCA) method are used to assess and compare 27 case studies in order to identify the factors that bring about success in the resolution of the conflicts in question. Our results indicate that a combination of different characteristics of shared motivation and joint action is sufficient for reaching agreement on the contested issues. However, most of the agreements are not stable due to political and administrative reasons. This study discusses the opportunities and constraints under which collaborative efforts unfold in the case studies. It could also help managers to enhance collaboration in the resolution process for environmental conflicts in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Application of Fractal and Gray-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix Indices to Assess the Forest Dynamics in the Curvature Carpathians—Romania
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 6927; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11246927 - 05 Dec 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
The mountain ecosystems face significant damage from deforestation and environmental forest changes. We investigated the evolution of tree types of cover areas, deforested areas and total deforested areas from Curvature Carpathians using Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix and fractal analysis. The forest dynamics mapping was [...] Read more.
The mountain ecosystems face significant damage from deforestation and environmental forest changes. We investigated the evolution of tree types of cover areas, deforested areas and total deforested areas from Curvature Carpathians using Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix and fractal analysis. The forest dynamics mapping was one of the main objectives of this study and it was carried out using multiple fractal and GLCM indices. We approached the analysis of satellite forest images by calculation of four fractal indices such as Pyramid dimension, Cube Counting Dimension, Fractal Fragmentation-Compaction Index and Tug-of-War lacunarity. We also calculated fractal dimension because it is an index of complexity comparing how the detail in a pattern changes with the scale at which it is measured. Fractal dimension is useful for estimation of irregularity or roughness of fractal and natural objects that do not conform to Euclidian geometry. While the fractal dimension quantifies how much space is occupied, the Tug-of-War lacunarity complements fractal dimension with its ability to quantify how space is occupied. Analysis was further supplemented by the Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix analysis because it quantifies spatial probability distributions of gray level values between pixel pairs within an image. The calculated Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix features included Angular Second Moment, Contrast, Correlation, Inverse Difference Moment and Entropy. Such comprehensive analysis has the advantage of combining fractal analysis that extracts quantitative information about the morphological complexity of the image with the spatial distribution of the gray pixel intensities as calculated by the co-occurrence features provided by Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix. Evolution of deforested areas, expansion of agricultural land and the increased demand for quality timber have affected the forests ecosystems and, the regional sustainable development of local communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Which Natural Areas are Preferred for Recreation? An Investigation of the Most Popular Natural Resting Types for Istanbul
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6773; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236773 - 29 Nov 2019
Abstract
This research focuses on people’s perceptions and expectations from nature and nature experience and their preferences of nature types. One-on-one face-to-face interviews were conducted with 500 respondents using a paper-pencil survey questionnaire. Our results show that the most frequently cited meaning of nature [...] Read more.
This research focuses on people’s perceptions and expectations from nature and nature experience and their preferences of nature types. One-on-one face-to-face interviews were conducted with 500 respondents using a paper-pencil survey questionnaire. Our results show that the most frequently cited meaning of nature was fresh air and green space. Overall, the majority of the respondents associated the concept of nature with green areas, coasts, and panoramas. The psychological dimension of nature was also mentioned by about one-third of the respondents. The most beloved part of being in nature reported by the respondents was being away from city life and work. The respondents had strong preferences for being near water, primarily by the seaside. It is concluded that, for many people, nature and biological components of nature help with the recovery from work stress and city hassle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Mountain Arable Land Abandonment (1968–2018) in the Romanian Carpathians: Environmental Conflicts and Sustainability Issues
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6679; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236679 - 26 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The agricultural mountain landscape in the Romanian Carpathians follows the same change trend in other European mountains, from variety and individuality to simplification and uniformization. Our paper proposes two complementary case studies from the Southern Carpathians—Poiana Mărului and Fundata, representative areas for the [...] Read more.
The agricultural mountain landscape in the Romanian Carpathians follows the same change trend in other European mountains, from variety and individuality to simplification and uniformization. Our paper proposes two complementary case studies from the Southern Carpathians—Poiana Mărului and Fundata, representative areas for the entire Carpathian ecoregion. The research focuses on a remote sensing approach with Corona KH-4B (1968) and Planet Scope (2018) images at 2.0–3.0 m resolution used for mapping arable plots pattern and size change. Landscape transformation modelling is focused on four-hectare sampled grid for both case study areas, followed by a landscape metric analysis. Fundata area is the most transformed, where arable plots disappeared under the service-based economy pressure. Poiana Mărului shows an earlier stage of landscape transformation, where the arable land abandonment process is incipient. The spatial and statistical analysis and field survey confirmed that tourism changed the traditional agricultural landscape, generating potential environmental conflicts and indicating the sustainability degree. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Economic Productivity vs. Ecological Protection in Danube Floodplain. Case Study: Danube’s Sector between Olt and Vedea
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6391; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226391 - 14 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
For a long time, wetlands were perceived as non-productive areas and were drained in an attempt to increase Romania’s agricultural surface, without acknowledging their ecological functions. This paper aims to identify possible ecological restoration models for the Danube floodplain according to the principles [...] Read more.
For a long time, wetlands were perceived as non-productive areas and were drained in an attempt to increase Romania’s agricultural surface, without acknowledging their ecological functions. This paper aims to identify possible ecological restoration models for the Danube floodplain according to the principles of sustainable development and the needs of the population living and working here. The research methodology included direct field observation, GIS techniques, and the survey method. The analysis proved the need for achieving the ecological restoration of this area while ensuring a harmonious relationship between nature and economic activities. After evaluating the views of local decision-making actors, different groups of stakeholders with divergent opinions emerged. While owners of agricultural holdings and agriculture experts pleaded for maintaining the status quo, NGOs voted for complete ecological restoration, and landowners with small farms, local authorities’ representatives, and environmental experts argued for partial ecological restoration. The study emphasises that the ecological restoration of the Danube floodplain is necessary but only possible through a consensus between the existing stakeholders and done based on the principles of sustainable development (conserving its biodiversity, protection against floods, economic activities). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Mining and Local Economies: Dilemma between Environmental Protection and Job Opportunities
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6244; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226244 - 07 Nov 2019
Abstract
Mining areas often experience a climate of social tension due to the potential trade-off between expected employment impact and concerns for environmental damage. We address this topic from a theoretical perspective that, unlike most empirical research, includes medium-term dynamics. We developed a two-sector [...] Read more.
Mining areas often experience a climate of social tension due to the potential trade-off between expected employment impact and concerns for environmental damage. We address this topic from a theoretical perspective that, unlike most empirical research, includes medium-term dynamics. We developed a two-sector dynamic model that provides a new way to identify differences among mining regions in terms of conflict risk, local development, and welfare. There are critical points in the natural-resource base of local nonmining activities and in the pollution rate of mining operations, which determine the type of dynamics and its welfare outcomes due to the opening up of the economy to mining investment. Pollution control is a sine qua non for welfare gains despite new job opportunities in the mining sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Housing Activism Initiatives and Land-Use Conflicts: Pathways for Participatory Planning and Urban Sustainable Development in Bucharest City, Romania
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6211; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226211 - 06 Nov 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper presents a geographical perspective of the phenomena of housing activism and land-use conflicts per se. It focuses not only on their spatial manifestations, but also on the complexity of the perceived meanings, values, and the power relationships among the involved parties, [...] Read more.
This paper presents a geographical perspective of the phenomena of housing activism and land-use conflicts per se. It focuses not only on their spatial manifestations, but also on the complexity of the perceived meanings, values, and the power relationships among the involved parties, rooting into activist geographies. The research methodology was based on two complementary methods: frame analysis to observe the emergence, sources of land-use conflicts, and nature of the relationships between the actors involved; and discourse analysis to explore the social interactions and power relations between structures and practices related to housing activism. For a more inclusive perspective on the sources of land-use conflicts and housing activism initiatives in Bucharest, we used a combination and triangulation of various sources and modes of data collection. Compared with other European cities with active civic engagement, this phenomenon is still emerging in Bucharest. Although conflicts are numerous, the civic initiatives are still fragmented and fail to generate a vision and implementable public policy. However, multiple assaults on urban spaces (green areas, historically protected areas) have resulted in more actions and actors (individual or organised) becoming civically engaged. The article contributes to the environmental debates that stress housing activism as a pathway to participatory planning initiatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dealing with Environmental Conflicts)
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