Special Issue "Urban Ecosystem Changes and Their Social-Ecological Drivers and Effects"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Andrzej Mizgajski
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Integrated Geography, Faculty of Geographical and Geological Sciences, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Ul. Bogumila Krygowskiego 10, 61-680 Poznań, Poland
Interests: environmental management; ecosystem services; urban ecology
Prof. Dr. Jürgen H. Breuste
Website
Guest Editor
Chair Urban and Landscape Ecology, Department of Geography and Geology, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr. 34, A 5020 Salzburg, Austria
Interests: urban ecology; urban nature protection; urban ecosystem management; urban ecosystem services; urban biodiversity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The proposed Special Issue will refer to the aims of The Third World Conference of the Society for Urban Ecology, which will take place 6–8 July 2020 in Poznań/Poland. The overlying title of the conference is “Cities as Social–Ecological Systems”. The Special Issue focuses on the ecological dimension of urban development in the view of sustainability. Among the particular objectives, the role of nature-based processes for humans’ life quality should be emphasized. Respecting the importance of ecosystems as structural elements of urban fabric is of high relevance. We highly welcome papers reflecting the values that humans apply to the green infrastructure in urban areas. We hope that the papers selected for this Special Issue will create an impactful set of publications linking the natural and social aspects of urban areas considered in light of sustainability.

Prof. Dr. Andrzej Mizgajski
Prof. Dr. Jürgen H. Breuste
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • The metabolism of urban ecosystems
  • Social awareness of urban ecosystems
  • Dynamics of urban landscapes
  • Urban development versus sustainability
  • Green infrastructure in the urban areas
  • Biodiversity in urban areas
  • Ecologically degraded urban areas

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Urbanization Impacts on Natural Habitat and Ecosystem Services in the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao “Megacity”
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6675; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166675 - 18 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The population aggregation and built-up area expansion caused by urbanization can have significant impacts on the supply and distribution of crucial ecosystem services. The correlation between urbanization and ecosystem services has been well-studied, but additional research is needed to better understand the spatiotemporal [...] Read more.
The population aggregation and built-up area expansion caused by urbanization can have significant impacts on the supply and distribution of crucial ecosystem services. The correlation between urbanization and ecosystem services has been well-studied, but additional research is needed to better understand the spatiotemporal interactions between ecosystem services and urbanization processes in highly urbanized areas as well as surrounding rural areas. In this paper, the relationships of urbanization with natural habitat and three key regulating ecosystem services—water retention, soil conservation, and carbon sequestration, were quantified and mapped for the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area (GBA), a rapidly developing urban agglomeration of over 70 million people, for the period of 2000–2018. Our results showed that urbanization caused a general decline in ecosystem services, and urbanization and ecosystem services exhibited a negative spatial correlation. However, this relationship varied along urban-rural gradients and weak decoupling was the overall trend during the course of the study period, indicating a greater need for the protection and improvement of ecosystem services. Our results provide instructive insights for new urbanization planning to maintain regional ecosystem services and sustainable development in the GBA and other large, rapidly urbanized agglomerations. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Construction of the Ecological Security Pattern of Urban Agglomeration under the Framework of Supply and Demand of Ecosystem Services Using Bayesian Network Machine Learning: Case Study of the Changsha–Zhuzhou–Xiangtan Urban Agglomeration, China
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6416; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226416 - 14 Nov 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Coordinating ecosystem service supply and demand equilibrium and utilizing machine learning to dynamically construct an ecological security pattern (ESP) can help better understand the impact of urban development on ecological processes, which can be used as a theoretical reference in coupling economic growth [...] Read more.
Coordinating ecosystem service supply and demand equilibrium and utilizing machine learning to dynamically construct an ecological security pattern (ESP) can help better understand the impact of urban development on ecological processes, which can be used as a theoretical reference in coupling economic growth and environmental protection. Here, the ESP of the Changsha–Zhuzhou–Xiangtan urban agglomeration was constructed, which made use of the Bayesian network model to dynamically identify the ecological sources. The ecological corridor and ecological strategy points were identified using the minimum cumulative resistance model and circuit theory. The ESP was constructed by combining seven ecological sources, “two horizontal and three vertical” ecological corridors, and 37 ecological strategy points. Our results found spatial decoupling between the supply and demand of ecosystem services (ES) and the degradation in areas with high demand for ES. The ecological sources and ecological corridors of the urban agglomeration were mainly situated in forestlands and water areas. The terrestrial ecological corridor was distributed along the outer periphery of the urban agglomeration, while the aquatic ecological corridor ran from north to south throughout the entire region. The ecological strategic points were mainly concentrated along the boundaries of the built-up area and the intersection between construction land and ecological land. Finally, the ecological sources were found primarily on existing ecological protection zones, which supports the usefulness of machine learning in predicting ecological sources and may provide new insights in developing urban ESP. Full article
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