Micro and Nano Technologies for Sport

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2017) | Viewed by 13307

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: mobile robots; motion control; road traffic control; global positioning system; driver information systems; electric motors; energy management systems; frequency response; fuel economy; hybrid electric vehicles
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Sport Science Department, Medicine and Science Sport Institute, CONI - Italian National Olympic Committee, Italy
Interests: Biomechanics of Sport, performance analysis

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Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Ambientale, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: MEMS; smart materials; micromechanics; machine learning-driven materials modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The improvement of an athlete's safety and performance passes through a thorough knowledge of the motion of the athlete, and the loads that are exchanged between the athlete and the equipment and/or environment. The measurement of motions and loads has to be as neutral as possible in order not to modify the athlete’s behavior and feeling; this can only be achieved through micro and nano sensors.This Special Issue aims at bringing together contributions from researchers, doctors and also athletes, who could greatly benefit from these new technologies. The focus is especially on the latest advances and applications of micro sensors in sports equipment, with particular focus on wearable, in-helmets, and distributed micro inertial measurement units. Papers devoted to overviews on the evolution of sensors for the study of Olympic Disciplines, and to neuroimaging techniques for functional brain exploration in post-traumatic rehabilitation are also welcome.

Dr. Francesco Braghin
Dr. Dario Dalla Vedova
Dr. Stefano Mariani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sport's safety

  • athlete's performance

  • equipment

  • environmental effects

  • micro and nano sensors.

  • neuroimaging techniques

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 4610 KiB  
Article
Non-Contact Respiration Measurement during Exercise Tolerance Test by Using Kinect Sensor
by Hirooki Aoki and Hidetoshi Nakamura
Sports 2018, 6(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6010023 - 13 Mar 2018
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 5207
Abstract
This study aims to assess non-contact respiration measurement during the exercise stress test using an upright bicycle ergometer and to evaluate the ventilation threshold value. We propose the tracking of the chest and abdomen by applying the motion capture function of the Kinect [...] Read more.
This study aims to assess non-contact respiration measurement during the exercise stress test using an upright bicycle ergometer and to evaluate the ventilation threshold value. We propose the tracking of the chest and abdomen by applying the motion capture function of the Kinect V2 sensor to cope with an increase in physical exercise accompanied by an increase in exercise intensity. In the proposed method, the region enclosed by the four joints corresponding to the left and right shoulders and the right and left hip extracted using the Kinect sensor is set as the region of interest. The region is updated in response to changes in body movements. By extracting the signal of the pedaling frequency component from the time series data of the volume in the region, only the volume change due to respiration was extracted. The point at which the increased rate of the volume change elevates is estimated as the ventilation threshold. The assessment of the efficacy of the proposed method by comparative analysis using an expiration gas analyzer confirmed that non-contact respiration evaluation is possible with an exercise intensity of about 160 W. Furthermore, the ventilation threshold estimated by the proposed method is ±10 W of the estimated value by expiratory gas analyzer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro and Nano Technologies for Sport)
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11 pages, 1359 KiB  
Article
The Demands of a Women’s College Soccer Season
by Jeremy A. Gentles, Christine L. Coniglio, Matthew M. Besemer, Joshua M. Morgan and Michael T. Mahnken
Sports 2018, 6(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6010016 - 23 Feb 2018
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 7193
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to use GPS, accelerometers, and session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) to examine the demands of a Division II women’s soccer team. Data was collected on 25 collegiate Division II women’s soccer players over an entire regular [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to use GPS, accelerometers, and session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) to examine the demands of a Division II women’s soccer team. Data was collected on 25 collegiate Division II women’s soccer players over an entire regular season (17 matches and 24 practices). ZephyrTM BioHarnesses (BHs) were used to collect tri-axial acceleration information and GPS derived variables for all matches and practices. Acceleration data was used to calculate Impulse Load, a measure of mechanical load that includes only locomotor related accelerations. GPS was used to quantify total distance and distance in six speed zones. Internal Training Loads were assessed via sRPE. Mean Impulse Load, total distance, and sRPE during match play was 20,120 ± 8609 N·s, 5.48 ± 2.35 km, and 892.50 ± 358.50, respectively. Mean Impulse Load, total distance, and sRPE during practice was 12,410 ± 4067 N·s, 2.95 ± 0.95 km, and 143.30 ± 123.50, respectively. Several very large to nearly perfect correlations were found between Impulse Load and total distance (r = 0.95; p < 0.001), Impulse Load and sRPE (r = 0.84; p < 0.001), and total distance and sRPE (r = 0.82; p < 0.001). This study details the mechanical demands of Division II women’s soccer match play. This study also demonstrates that Impulse Load is a good indicator of total distance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro and Nano Technologies for Sport)
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