Special Issue "Physical Performance in Team Sports"

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Fabrizio Perroni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
eCampus University, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Psycology, Rome, Italy
Interests: soccer; development; strength and conditioning training; rehabilitation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Team sports are the most popular game in the world, played at all levels (amateur and professional), all ages (children, adolescents, adults and elderly), and genders (male and female). In the recent literature, it has been shown how performance in team sports depends on high levels of technical, tactical and physical conditioning, which include anatomical, functional, biomechanical and physiological adaptations induced by training. Consequently, the aim of physical conditioning, as well as providing a stimulus with specific adaptations that will translate into better athletic performance, should be to protect physical well-being that is sorely tested by a sporting competition characterized by a long period of time. If there is no scientific knowledge about training, the increase in the load administered to achieve these objectives may stress the athlete by increasing the injury risk. This Special Issue of Sports aims at creating a multidisciplinary forum for discussion on recent advanced results in this area and, for this reason, calls on authors to submit original research and/or specific reviews that improve our understanding of “Physical Performance in Team Sports”. Potential topics include, but are not limited to: Physiological and psychological demands of game, strength and conditioning, match analysis and technological advances, functional evaluation, injury, prevention and rehabilitation, and performance analysis of female players.

Prof. Fabrizio Perroni
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physiological and Psychological responses
  • Strength and conditioning
  • Biomechanics
  • Match analysis
  • Functional evaluation
  • Injury
  • Female players

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Classification of Soccer and Basketball Players’ Jumping Performance Characteristics: A Logistic Regression Approach
Sports 2019, 7(7), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7070163 - 04 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study aimed to examine countermovement jump (CMJ) kinetic data using logistic regression, in order to distinguish sports-related mechanical profiles. Eighty-one professional basketball and soccer athletes participated, each performing three CMJs on a force platform. Inferential parametric and nonparametric statistics were performed to [...] Read more.
This study aimed to examine countermovement jump (CMJ) kinetic data using logistic regression, in order to distinguish sports-related mechanical profiles. Eighty-one professional basketball and soccer athletes participated, each performing three CMJs on a force platform. Inferential parametric and nonparametric statistics were performed to explore group differences. Binary logistic regression was used to model the response variable (soccer or not soccer). Statistical significance (p < 0.05) was reached for differences between groups in maximum braking rate of force development (RFDDmax, U79 = 1035), mean braking rate of force development (RFDDavg, U79 = 1038), propulsive impulse (IMPU, t79 = 2.375), minimum value of vertical displacement for center of mass (SBCMmin, t79 = 3.135), and time difference (% of impulse time; ΔΤ) between the peak value of maximum force value (FUmax) and SBCMmin (U79 = 1188). Logistic regression showed that RFDDavg, impulse during the downward phase (IMPD), IMPU, and ΔΤ were all significant predictors. The model showed that soccer group membership could be strongly related to IMPU, with the odds ratio being 6.48 times higher from the basketball group, whereas RFDDavg, IMPD, and ΔΤ were related to basketball group. The results imply that soccer players execute CMJ differently compared to basketball players, exhibiting increased countermovement depth and impulse generation during the propulsive phase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Performance in Team Sports)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Wearing a Lower Body Compression Garment on Anaerobic Exercise Performance in Division I NCAA Basketball Players
Sports 2019, 7(6), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7060144 - 13 Jun 2019
Abstract
Lower body compression (LBC) has been shown as an effective recovery tool from basketball but it is unknown how it affects performance. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of wearing a LBC garment on anaerobic exercise performance in collegiate [...] Read more.
Lower body compression (LBC) has been shown as an effective recovery tool from basketball but it is unknown how it affects performance. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of wearing a LBC garment on anaerobic exercise performance in collegiate basketball players. Healthy Division I collegiate basketball players (n = 12) were recruited for this study. In a crossover, counterbalanced study design, subjects volunteered to participate in two separate visits each with a different condition: wearing a LBC garment or non-compressive control (CON) garment. During each visit, subjects completed 2 × 30 second Wingate Anaerobic Tests (WAnTs) separated by a 5-min active recovery period. Each visit was separated by a 72 h washout period. Results revealed that over the 2 × 30 second WAnTs, mean power output (p = 0.028; d= 0.35), anaerobic capacity (p = 0.018; d = 0.45), and total work (p = 0.027; d = 0.36) were higher when wearing the LBC versus CON garment. However, peak power output (p = 0.319; d = 0.09), anaerobic power (p = 0.263; d = 0.23), and fatigue index (p = 0.749; d = 0.05) were not statistically different. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was significantly lower (p = 0.032; d = 0.72) with LBC compared to CON. Results indicate that LBC may increase anaerobic exercise performance in collegiate basketball players. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Performance in Team Sports)
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Open AccessArticle
Countermovement Jump Inter-Limb Asymmetries in Collegiate Basketball Players
Sports 2019, 7(5), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7050103 - 30 Apr 2019
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to establish the intrasession and intersession reliability of variables obtained from a force plate that was used to quantitate lower extremity inter-limb asymmetry during the bilateral countermovement jump (CMJ). Secondarily, a comparison was performed to determine [...] Read more.
The purpose of the present study was to establish the intrasession and intersession reliability of variables obtained from a force plate that was used to quantitate lower extremity inter-limb asymmetry during the bilateral countermovement jump (CMJ). Secondarily, a comparison was performed to determine the influence of the jump protocol CMJ with or without an arm swing (CMJ AS and CMJ NAS, respectively) on inter-limb asymmetries. Twenty-two collegiate basketball players performed three CMJ AS and three CMJ NAS on dual force platforms during two separate testing sessions. A majority of variables met the acceptable criterion of intersession and intrasession relative reliability (ICC > 0.700), while fewer than half met standards established for absolute reliability (CV < 10%). CMJ protocol appeared to influence asymmetries; Concentric Impulse-100 ms, Eccentric Braking Rate of Force Development, Eccentric Deceleration, and Force at Zero velocity were significantly different between jumping conditions (CMJAS versus CMJ NAS; p < 0.05). The present data establish the reliability and smallest worthwhile change of inter-limb asymmetries during the CMJ, while also identifying the influence of CMJ protocol on inter-limb asymmetries, which can be useful to practitioners and clinicians in order to effectively monitor changes associated with performance, injury risk, and return-to-play strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Performance in Team Sports)
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Open AccessArticle
The Relationship of Age and BMI with Physical Fitness in Futsal Players
Sports 2019, 7(4), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7040087 - 15 Apr 2019
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of age and body mass status with field and laboratory measures of physical fitness in futsal players. Futsal players (n = 65, age 12.9 ± 2.8 years), who were classified into U11 [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of age and body mass status with field and laboratory measures of physical fitness in futsal players. Futsal players (n = 65, age 12.9 ± 2.8 years), who were classified into U11 (n = 28, 9–11 years), U13 (n = 21, 11–13 years), and adults (n = 16, >18 years), performed a physical fitness battery consisting of both laboratory and field tests. A similar prevalence of overweight (25%) was observed in all age groups (χ2 = 1.94, p = 0.380, φ = 0.17). Age groups differed for all parameters, except body fat percentage, with adult players showing higher values than the younger groups (p < 0.05). U13 was heavier, taller, and had larger fat-free mass than U11 (p < 0.05). Adult players had superior values than their younger counterparts for all physical fitness parameters (p < 0.05). Body mass index (BMI) correlated inversely with aerobic capacity (U13), jumping ability, relative isometric muscle strength, and relative mean power in the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) (U11) (p < 0.05). Also, it correlated directly with absolute isometric muscle strength (U11) and peak power, mean power (all groups), and fatigue index (U11, U13) in WAnT (p < 0.05). Considering the results of this study, it was concluded that the prevalence of overweight in futsal players should be an important concern for practitioners working in this team sport. Optimizing BMI should be considered as a training and nutrition goal in order to improve sport performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Performance in Team Sports)
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Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Countermovement Jump Protocol on Reactive Strength Index Modified and Flight Time: Contraction Time in Collegiate Basketball Players
Sports 2019, 7(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7020037 - 12 Feb 2019
Abstract
The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate differences in Reactive Strength Index Modified (RSIMod) and Flight Time to Contraction Time Ratio (FT:CT) during the countermovement jump (CMJ) performed without the arm swing (CMJNAS) compared to the CMJ with the [...] Read more.
The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate differences in Reactive Strength Index Modified (RSIMod) and Flight Time to Contraction Time Ratio (FT:CT) during the countermovement jump (CMJ) performed without the arm swing (CMJNAS) compared to the CMJ with the arm swing (CMJAS), while exploring the relationship within each variable between jump protocols. A secondary purpose sought to explore the relationship between RSIMod and FT:CT during both jump protocols. Twenty-two collegiate basketball players performed both three CMJNAS and three CMJAS on a force plate, during two separate testing sessions. RSIMod was calculated by the flight-time (RSIModFT) and impulse-momentum methods (RSIModIMP). CMJ variables were significantly greater during the CMJAS compared to CMJNAS (p < 0.001). There were large to very large correlations within each variable between the CMJAS and CMJNAS. There were significant positive correlations among RSIModFT, RSIModIMP, and FT:CT during both the CMJAS (r ≥ 0.864, p < 0.001) and CMJNAS (r ≥ 0.960, p < 0.001). These findings identify an increase in RSIMod or FT:CT during the CMJAS, that may provide independent information from the CMJNAS. In addition, either RSIMod or FT:CT may be utilized to monitor changes in performance, but simultaneous inclusion may be unnecessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Performance in Team Sports)
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