Next Article in Journal
Intensity Thresholds and Maximal Lactate Steady State in Small Muscle Group Exercise
Next Article in Special Issue
Physical and Fitness Characteristics of Elite Professional Rugby Union Players
Previous Article in Journal
Does the Order of Submaximal Lactate Threshold and Maximal Oxygen Uptake Testing Influence Test Outcomes?
Previous Article in Special Issue
Reliability of a Repeated High-Intensity Effort Test for Elite Rugby Union Players
Article

Can Countermovement Jump Neuromuscular Performance Qualities Differentiate Maximal Horizontal Deceleration Ability in Team Sport Athletes?

1
Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE, UK
2
Masira Research Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Santander (UDES), Bucaramanga 680005, Colombia
3
Mindeporte (Colombian Ministry of Sport) High Performance Centre, Bogota 111071, Colombia
4
Centre for Elite Performance, French Football Federation, 75015 Paris, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2020, 8(6), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8060076
Received: 24 April 2020 / Revised: 18 May 2020 / Accepted: 19 May 2020 / Published: 27 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Performance in Team Sports)
This investigation aimed to determine the countermovement jump (CMJ) neuromuscular performance (NMP) qualities that differentiate between athletes with high or low horizontal deceleration ability. Twenty-seven male university team sport athletes performed a CMJ on vertical axis force plates and a maximal horizontal deceleration following a 20 m maximal horizontal sprint acceleration. The instantaneous velocity throughout the maximal horizontal deceleration test was measured using a radar device. The deceleration ability was evaluated using the average deceleration (HDEC, m·s−2) and change in momentum—referred to as the horizontal braking impulse (HBI, N·s·kg−1). Participants were dichotomised into high and low HDEC and HBI according to a median-split analysis, and CMJ variables calculated for the overall eccentric, eccentric-deceleration and concentric phases. When horizontal deceleration ability was defined by HDEC, the CMJ concentric (effect size (ES) = 0.95) and eccentric (ES = 0.72) peak forces were the variables with the largest difference between groups. However, when defined using HBI, the largest difference was the concentric (ES = 1.15) and eccentric (ES = −1.00) peak velocities. Only the concentric mean power was significantly different between the high and low groups for both HDEC (ES = 0.85) and HBI (ES = 0.96). These findings show that specific eccentric and concentric NMP qualities may underpin the horizontal deceleration abilities characterised by HDEC and HBI. Specific NMP training interventions may be beneficial to target improvements in either of these measures of horizontal deceleration abilities. View Full-Text
Keywords: eccentric; concentric; force; impulse; velocity eccentric; concentric; force; impulse; velocity
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Harper, D.J.; Cohen, D.D.; Carling, C.; Kiely, J. Can Countermovement Jump Neuromuscular Performance Qualities Differentiate Maximal Horizontal Deceleration Ability in Team Sport Athletes? Sports 2020, 8, 76. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8060076

AMA Style

Harper DJ, Cohen DD, Carling C, Kiely J. Can Countermovement Jump Neuromuscular Performance Qualities Differentiate Maximal Horizontal Deceleration Ability in Team Sport Athletes? Sports. 2020; 8(6):76. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8060076

Chicago/Turabian Style

Harper, Damian J., Daniel D. Cohen, Christopher Carling, and John Kiely. 2020. "Can Countermovement Jump Neuromuscular Performance Qualities Differentiate Maximal Horizontal Deceleration Ability in Team Sport Athletes?" Sports 8, no. 6: 76. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8060076

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop