Optimising Interval Training Prescription (Volume II)

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2023) | Viewed by 6634

Special Issue Editor

Department of Kinesiology, Laval University, Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
Interests: hypoxic training; altitude; blood-flow restriction; interval training; performance enhancement; exercise tolerance; tissue oxygenation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

High-intensity interval training (HIT) is one of the most effective ways to improve performance in various sports. Extensive research has focused on understanding the acute and chronic effects of different forms of HIT to optimize prescription in athletes. Various peripheral, cardiovascular, and neural adaptations contribute to increased cardiorespiratory fitness, power, and endurance after HIT programs. However, sport scientists and coaches continue to explore innovative ways to increase the load (i.e., stress) imposed by such training sessions to further optimize physiological adaptations and produce greater athletic performance gains. For example, varied training characteristics, environmental, and nutritional manipulations have been demonstrated as superior training methods compared to HIIT alone.

In the ever-changing context of high-performance sport, providing practitioners with new evidence-based information about effective stimuli to enhance the efficacy of HIT for varied athletic populations is essential. Therefore, this Special Issue welcomes original research contributions that provide new knowledge on the use of external stimuli and/or manipulation of training variables to enhance the quality of acute and chronic interval and repeated-sprint training sessions for long-term adaptations in trained athletes. Contributions should also explore the physiological mechanisms at play to better comprehend performance gains.

Prof. Dr. François Billaut
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • performance enhancement
  • training prescription
  • interval training
  • repeated-sprint exercise
  • exercise tolerance
  • athletes
  • ergogenic aids

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 712 KiB  
Article
Acute Oxygen Consumption Response to Fast Start High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise
Sports 2023, 11(12), 238; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports11120238 - 01 Dec 2023
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Abstract
The current investigation compared the acute oxygen consumption (VO2) response of two high-intensity interval exercises (HIIE), fast start (FSHIIE), and steady power (SPHIIE), which matched w prime (W’) depletion. Eight cyclists completed an incremental max test and a three-minute all-out test [...] Read more.
The current investigation compared the acute oxygen consumption (VO2) response of two high-intensity interval exercises (HIIE), fast start (FSHIIE), and steady power (SPHIIE), which matched w prime (W’) depletion. Eight cyclists completed an incremental max test and a three-minute all-out test (3MT) to determine maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), critical power (CP), and W’. HIIE sessions consisted of 3 X 4 min intervals interspersed by 3 min of active recovery, with W’ depleted by 60% (W’target) within each working interval. SPHIIE depleted the W’target consistently throughout the 3 min intervals, while FSHIIE depleted the W’target by 50% within the first minute, with the remaining 50% depleted evenly across the remainder of the interval. The paired samples t-test revealed no differences in the percentage of training time spent above 90% of VO2max (PT ≥ 90% VO2max) between SPHIIE and FSHIIE with an average of 25.20% and 26.07%, respectively. Pairwise comparisons indicated a difference between minute 1 peak VO2, minute 2, and minute 3, while no differences were present between minutes 2 and 3. The results suggest that when HIIE formats are matched based on W’ expenditure, there are no differences in PT ≥ 90% VO2max or peak VO2 during each interval. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optimising Interval Training Prescription (Volume II))
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16 pages, 2948 KiB  
Article
Periodized Aerobic Training between Thresholds Improves Submaximal Cardiorespiratory Parameters in Octogenarians
Sports 2023, 11(11), 219; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports11110219 - 08 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Background and Aims: The worldwide aging population is expanding, with more individuals living into their 80s. Physiological functions decline gradually with age, compounded by sedentary lifestyles. Incorporating physical activity into daily routine is crucial for maintaining independence. This study aimed to assess a [...] Read more.
Background and Aims: The worldwide aging population is expanding, with more individuals living into their 80s. Physiological functions decline gradually with age, compounded by sedentary lifestyles. Incorporating physical activity into daily routine is crucial for maintaining independence. This study aimed to assess a periodized high-intensity aerobic training program (PEZO-BT) in octogenarians, focusing on submaximal ergospirometry effects. Methods: A total of 48 non-frail octogenarian subjects (12 females, 36 males) were randomized into control and intervention groups. All subjects underwent submaximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing with gas analysis at baseline, stopping after the respiratory compensation point (RCP). Our intervention group completed a 14-week PEZO-BT aerobic training program. The outcomes were oxygen consumption at first ventilatory threshold (VO2AT), ventilatory efficiency slope (VE/VCO2), oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES), cardiorespiratory optimal point (COP), oxygen pulse change (ΔVO2/HR) from anaerobic threshold (AT) to respiratory compensation point (RCP), and power output at anaerobic threshold (POAT). Results: Mixed ANOVA examined time and treatment effects. If significance emerged, post hoc t-tests were used to compare significances between groups. The homogeneity of variance was assessed using Levene’s test. Chi-square tests compared ergospirometry criteria and ventilatory performance within groups. The mean differences at post intervention were significant in VO2AT (p < 0.001), VE/VCO2 (p < 0.001), ΔVO2/HR (p < 0.05), and POAT (p < 0.001), while OUES and COP were not significant (p > 0.05). However, clinical effects were observed in the entire intervention group. Conclusions: Training improved exercise capacity and workload. Overall, this periodic aerobic and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) program yielded significant improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in previously untrained octogenarians with and without comorbidities. The findings suggest implications for promoting long-term healthy aging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optimising Interval Training Prescription (Volume II))
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Review

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21 pages, 661 KiB  
Review
High-Intensity Training for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Narrative Review
Sports 2023, 11(4), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports11040091 - 20 Apr 2023
Viewed by 3088
Abstract
Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease worldwide. Exercise therapy has been identified as a first-line treatment option in patients suffering from knee OA. High-intensity training (HIT) is an innovative exercise modality with potential in improving various disease-related outcomes. The purpose [...] Read more.
Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease worldwide. Exercise therapy has been identified as a first-line treatment option in patients suffering from knee OA. High-intensity training (HIT) is an innovative exercise modality with potential in improving various disease-related outcomes. The purpose of this review is to explore the impact of HIT on knee OA symptoms and physical functioning. A comprehensive search of scientific electronic databases was conducted to identify articles on the effects of HIT on knee OA. Thirteen studies were included in this review. Ten compared the effects of HIT with those of low-intensity training, moderate-intensity continuous training, or a control group. Three evaluated the effects of HIT alone. Eight reported a decrease in knee OA symptoms (especially pain), and eight reported an increase in physical functioning. HIT was shown to improve knee OA symptoms and physical functioning, but also aerobic capacity, muscle strength, and quality of life with minimal or no adverse events. However, compared with other exercise modalities, no clear superiority of HIT was found. HIT is a promising exercise strategy in patients with knee OA; nonetheless, the actual quality of evidence remains very low, and more high-quality studies are needed to confirm these promising outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optimising Interval Training Prescription (Volume II))
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