Focus on the Health of Young Athletes and Team Sports Performance

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 5990

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education and Sport, University of Madeira, 9020-105 Funchal, Portugal
Interests: functional fitness; cognitive function; quality of life; physical activity; physical education; interactive technologies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Physical Education and Sport, University of Madeira, 9020-105 Funchal, Portugal
2. LARSYS, Interactive Technologies Institute, 9020‐105 Funchal, Portugal
Interests: team sports; performance; basketball; coaching; assessment; elite; youth
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Physical Culture Sciences, Medical College of Rzeszów University, Rzeszów University, 35-959 Rzeszów, Poland
Interests: sports biomechanics; human movement analysis; computer science in sports; sports prediction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In youth, team sports are one of the most popular sports practices. The benefits of sports participation for health, social competencies (i.e., creativity, autonomy, problem-solving, social and emotional characteristics), and education have been widely explored by researchers. Among competitive sports, scientific contributions from several research fields have improved and optimized young athletes’ training. However, optimal performance in youth does not ensure optimal performance in the future. Therefore, providing young athletes with the right tools to support their long-term development should concern all involved in the early stages of sports participation.

This Special Issue offers the opportunity to publish high-quality original papers, systematic review papers, and meta-analyses focused on the young athletes enrolled in team sports. We are particularly interested in the following research topics: growth and biological maturation; physical fitness assessment; sex differences; training load analysis; technical and tactical development; injury; motor skills performance.

Dr. Élvio Gouveia
Dr. Cíntia França
Dr. Krzysztof Przednowek
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • training methods
  • motor skills
  • growth
  • maturation
  • load
  • fitness
  • body composition
  • injury
  • performance assessment
  • monitoring

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 914 KiB  
Article
Direct and Indirect Effects of Youth Sports Participation on Emotional Intelligence, Self-Esteem, and Life Satisfaction
by Helder Miguel Fernandes, Henrique Costa, Pedro Esteves, Aristides M. Machado-Rodrigues and Teresa Fonseca
Sports 2024, 12(6), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports12060155 - 3 Jun 2024
Viewed by 525
Abstract
The present study investigated the mediating effects of emotional intelligence and self-esteem between youth sports participation and life satisfaction, as well as the comparative effects of different types of sports involvement (team, individual, and non-participation) on these selected variables. A sample of 1053 [...] Read more.
The present study investigated the mediating effects of emotional intelligence and self-esteem between youth sports participation and life satisfaction, as well as the comparative effects of different types of sports involvement (team, individual, and non-participation) on these selected variables. A sample of 1053 Portuguese adolescents (612 girls and 441 boys), aged between 12 and 18 years (M = 14.40; SD = 1.55), completed the following self-report measures: the Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence Scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. The structural equation modeling results indicated a complete mediating role of two emotional intelligence dimensions (use of emotion and self-emotional appraisal) and self-esteem in the relationship between sports participation and adolescents’ life satisfaction. Team sport participants reported higher emotional intelligence and self-esteem scores than their non-sport participant counterparts who revealed lower levels of emotion use than their individual sport participant peers. These findings provide novel insights into the potential emotional and psychological mechanisms underlying the association between youth sports participation and life satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Focus on the Health of Young Athletes and Team Sports Performance)
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16 pages, 280 KiB  
Article
Investigating Sport Stakeholders’ Understanding of Behaviour Management within a Competitive Youth Baseball Team
by Joseph John Gurgis, Gretchen Kerr and Anthony Battaglia
Sports 2023, 11(3), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports11030069 - 17 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1994
Abstract
The following study employed an instrumental case study to investigate sport stakeholders’ understandings of behavioural management strategies used in competitive youth baseball, including the identification of common strategies and interpretations of these as punishment or discipline. Twenty-one participants, from one competitive (AAA) all-boys [...] Read more.
The following study employed an instrumental case study to investigate sport stakeholders’ understandings of behavioural management strategies used in competitive youth baseball, including the identification of common strategies and interpretations of these as punishment or discipline. Twenty-one participants, from one competitive (AAA) all-boys baseball team, including three coaches, eleven baseball players, and seven parents, were recruited to participate in an individual semi-structured interview. Interviews ranged between 30 and 150 min, and data were analyzed using reflexive thematic analysis. Several behaviour management tactics were identified, of which exercise, benching and yelling negative comments were most often reported. While participants interpreted excessive exercise and benching as punitive and/or disciplinary approaches to behavioural management, yelling was consistently viewed as punitive. Participants confused punishment and discipline as interchangeable, thus suggesting a lack of awareness regarding developmentally appropriate strategies of behavioural management and highlighting the normalization of certain punitive tactics in youth sport. The results underscore the necessity of imparting knowledge to the sports community regarding age-appropriate behavioural management interventions to foster safe and enjoyable athletic experiences for youth competitors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Focus on the Health of Young Athletes and Team Sports Performance)
15 pages, 4786 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Athlete Monitoring Tools across 10 Weeks of Elite Youth Basketball Training: An Explorative Study
by Branson L. Palmer, Grant E. van der Ploeg, Pitre C. Bourdon, Scott R. Butler and Robert G. Crowther
Sports 2023, 11(2), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports11020026 - 25 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2697
Abstract
The growth of sport science technology is enabling more sporting teams to implement athlete monitoring practices related to performance testing and load monitoring. Despite the increased emphasis on youth athlete development, the lack of longitudinal athlete monitoring literature in youth athletes is concerning, [...] Read more.
The growth of sport science technology is enabling more sporting teams to implement athlete monitoring practices related to performance testing and load monitoring. Despite the increased emphasis on youth athlete development, the lack of longitudinal athlete monitoring literature in youth athletes is concerning, especially for indoor sports such as basketball. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of six different athlete monitoring methods over 10 weeks of youth basketball training. Fourteen state-level youth basketball players (5 males and 9 females; 15.1 ± 1.0 years) completed this study during their pre-competition phase prior to their national basketball tournament. Daily wellness and activity surveys were completed using the OwnUrGoal mobile application, along with heart rate (HR) and inertial measurement unit (IMU) recordings at each state training session, and weekly performance testing (3x countermovement jumps [CMJs], and 3x isometric mid-thigh pulls [IMTPs]). All of the athlete monitoring methods demonstrated the coaching staff’s training intent to maintain performance and avoid spikes in workload. Monitoring IMU data combined with PlayerLoad™ data analysis demonstrated more effectiveness for monitoring accumulated load (AL) compared to HR analysis. All six methods of athlete monitoring detected similar trends for all sessions despite small-trivial correlations between each method (Pearson’s correlation: −0.24 < r < 0.28). The use of subjective monitoring questionnaire applications, such as OwnUrGoal, is recommended for youth sporting clubs, given its practicability and low-cost. Regular athlete education from coaches and support staff regarding the use of these questionnaires is required to gain the best data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Focus on the Health of Young Athletes and Team Sports Performance)
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