Special Issue "Ion Chromatography"

A special issue of Separations (ISSN 2297-8739).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 March 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Christopher R. Harrison

Department of Chemistry, University of San Diego, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: capillary electrophoresis; anti-doping analysis; ion chromatography stationary phases; electroosmotic flow control

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The widespread applicability and need for ion analysis has driven the evolution of ion chromatography (IC) for several decades. The continued demand for rapid, economical, sensitive, and selective ion analyses by a wide range of industries and in a variety of matrices continues to push IC innovation. Marked advances and developments have been made in the past decade, and continue presently in all aspects of IC, including stationary phases, columns, suppressor, detectors, and even eluent generators. This Special Issue aims to present the most recent advances in IC technology, as well as the application of IC in chemical analysis. Both fundamental and applied works are equally welcome.

Dr. Christopher R. Harrison
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • ion chromatography
  • ion exchange
  • ion analysis
  • selectivity
  • sensitivity
  • stationary phase
  • ion suppression

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Optimization of Lactoperoxidase and Lactoferrin Separation on an Ion-Exchange Chromatography Step
Separations 2017, 4(2), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations4020010
Received: 11 January 2017 / Revised: 13 March 2017 / Accepted: 17 March 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3243 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Lactoperoxidase (LP), which is a high-value minor whey protein, has recently drawn extensive attention from research scientists and industry due to its multiplicity of function and potential therapeutic applications. In this study, the separation and optimization of two similar-sized proteins, LP and lactoferrin [...] Read more.
Lactoperoxidase (LP), which is a high-value minor whey protein, has recently drawn extensive attention from research scientists and industry due to its multiplicity of function and potential therapeutic applications. In this study, the separation and optimization of two similar-sized proteins, LP and lactoferrin (LF) were investigated using strong cation exchange column chromatography. A two-step optimization strategy was developed for the separation of LP and LF. Optimization was started with central composite design-based experiments to characterize the influences of different decision variables, namely, flow rate, length of gradient, and final salt concentration in the linear elution gradient step on the yield of LP. This was followed by a more accurate optimization of ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) separation of LP and LF based on an experimentally verified chromatographic model. The optimal operating points were found and the results were compared with validation experiments. Predictions respecting yield confirmed a very good agreement with experimental results with improved product purity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ion Chromatography)
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Open AccessArticle
Detecting Adulterated Commercial Sweet Sorghum Syrups with Ion Chromatography Oligosaccharide Fingerprint Profiles
Separations 2016, 3(3), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations3030020
Received: 16 February 2016 / Revised: 6 July 2016 / Accepted: 9 July 2016 / Published: 20 July 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5303 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Some commercial sweet sorghum syrups can be fraudulently or accidently adulterated with inexpensive sugar syrups, particularly high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) or corn syrup, and sold at a relatively low market price or even mis-branded. This undermines the economic stability of the current [...] Read more.
Some commercial sweet sorghum syrups can be fraudulently or accidently adulterated with inexpensive sugar syrups, particularly high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) or corn syrup, and sold at a relatively low market price or even mis-branded. This undermines the economic stability of the current small-scale producers of food-grade sweet sorghum syrup as well as the developing large-scale bioproduct industry. An analytical method is urgently needed to evaluate adulterated commercial sweet sorghum syrups. Ion chromatography with integrated pulsed amperometric detection (IC-IPAD) has been previously used to differentiate white, refined sugars manufactured from sugarcane and sugar beet. By applying a strong IC-IPAD NaOH/NaOAc gradient method over 45 min, monosaccharides, oligosaccharides and oligosaccharide isomers of at least 2 to 12 dp, as well as sugar alcohols can be detected in multiple commercial sweet sorghum and other sugar syrups. Fingerprint IC oligosaccharide profiles are extremely selective, sensitive, and reliable. By using five characteristic marker chromatography peaks of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), including isomaltose, maltose and maltotriose, in combination with a low sucrose peak, adulterated and mis-branded syrups were identified. The analysis of 7.0 Brix blind syrup samples, marker peaks allowed the detection of as low as 10% HFCS adulteration, which is within the lower limit of adulteration before action is taken. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ion Chromatography)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
The Simultaneous Determination of Silicic, Boric and Carbonic Acids in Natural Water via Ion-Exclusion Chromatography with a Charged Aerosol Detector
Received: 14 January 2016 / Revised: 21 February 2016 / Accepted: 26 February 2016 / Published: 8 March 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1255 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The simple and simultaneous determination of silicic, boric and carbonic acids was made using ion-exclusion chromatography (IEC) and a Corona™ charged aerosol detector (C-CAD). Silicic and boric acids were separated by the column packed with a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in H+ [...] Read more.
The simple and simultaneous determination of silicic, boric and carbonic acids was made using ion-exclusion chromatography (IEC) and a Corona™ charged aerosol detector (C-CAD). Silicic and boric acids were separated by the column packed with a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in H+-form and ultra-pure water eluent, and the detector responses were improved by the addition of acetonitrile to eluent. Under the optimized conditions, the simultaneous determination of weak inorganic acids, except for carbonic acid, was successfully performed. When the conversion column packed with a strong acidic cation-exchange resin in Na+- or K+-form was inserted between the separation column and the detector, weak inorganic acids including carbonic acid could be detected by the C-CAD. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.5–10 mg·L−1 as Si for silicic acid (r2 = 0.996), 10–100 mg·L−1 as B for boric acid (r2 = 0.998) and 1.3–21 mg·L−1 as C for carbonic acid (r2 = 0.993). The detection limits based on three times the standard deviation were 0.03 mg·L−1 as Si for silicic acid, 0.40 mg·L−1 as B for boric acid and 0.08 mg·L−1 as C for carbonic acid. This method was applicable to river, hot spring and drinking water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ion Chromatography)
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