Special Issue "Identification and Analysis of Compounds in Food Samples"

A special issue of Separations (ISSN 2297-8739). This special issue belongs to the section "Analysis of Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 2025

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Małgorzata Starowicz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry and Biodynamics of Food, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 10-748 Olsztyn, Poland
Interests: food chemistry; gas chromatography; solid phase microextraction; bioactive compounds; volatiles; Maillard reaction; thermall processing; sensomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food production is now focused on developing a wide range of products, from “superfoods” to “meat alternatives”. They are dedicated to a specific group of consumers, such as vegans and vegetarians, sportsmen, or breastfeeding mothers. Determination of volatile and non-volatile chemical markers plays an important part in food characterization. Therefore, analysis of food covers modern methods to determine food safety, including environmental and process contaminants, toxins, allergens, microbes, food authenticity and origin, as well as the quality of food that could be characterized by flavor and aroma, and products’ shelf-life. Food is a composition of various chemical compounds that may come from raw materials or may arise during thermal processing, for example via Maillard reaction or fermentation processes. The molecules identified in food products are mostly vitamins, minerals, bioactive compounds (e.g. flavonoids, phenolic acids), aroma compounds (aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, pyrazine, furan derivatives, esters, and terpenes). The techniques of compound determination, identification, and extraction are constantly developing, in the so-called OMICS field of research (volatolomics, metabolomics, proteomics, sensomics), which can be presented separately but also be a basis of multidisciplinary research. Therefore, the aspect of identification and analysis of compounds in food material is a subject-of-interest to this special issue.

Therefore, it is my pleasure to invite you to contribute your research article, communication, or review in this Special Issue dedicted to techniques of active compounds identification in varied food samples.

Dr. Małgorzata Starowicz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Separations is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food samples
  • quantitative analysis
  • active compounds
  • aroma compounds
  • volatiles determination
  • extraction
  • biomolecules
  • analytical methods
  • chromatography
  • flavor formation
  • volatolomics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Detecting Myosin Light Chain 3 in Dry-Aged Beef
Separations 2021, 8(11), 219; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations8110219 - 16 Nov 2021
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Abstract
Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) is a more accurate technique for detecting proteins than electrophoresis-based methods such as western blotting. Because of its convenience, western blotting is commonly used for protein analysis in beef. We developed a method for detecting myosin light chain [...] Read more.
Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) is a more accurate technique for detecting proteins than electrophoresis-based methods such as western blotting. Because of its convenience, western blotting is commonly used for protein analysis in beef. We developed a method for detecting myosin light chain 3 (myl3) in beef samples, particularly dry-aged beef, using LC/MS/MS for quality testing. Musculus longissimus dorsi of Holstein was aged for 0, 2, 4, 5, 9, 11, 17, 20, and 24 weeks and used to measure the myl3 concentration. Because of the high molecular weight of myl3, the limitations of LC/MS/MS were overcome by implementing immunoprecipitation and digestion steps. Ultimately, a tryptic fragment of myl3 (13-mer), generated using immunoprecipitation and digestion by a biotinylated antibody, was detected using LC-MS/MS in positive ion mode through multiple reaction monitoring and analyte separation on a C18 column. Our method showed limits of detection and quantification of less than 0.3 and 0.8 μg/kg, respectively. However, differences in the myl3 concentrations according to the aging time were not significant (p > 0.05). After 12 weeks, myl3 disappeared in tested all samples, thus our analytical method can be used for accurate measurement of muscle protein in beef samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identification and Analysis of Compounds in Food Samples)
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Review

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Review
Analysis of Volatiles in Food Products
Separations 2021, 8(9), 157; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations8090157 - 17 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 940
Abstract
The evaluation of volatiles in food is an important aspect of food production. It gives knowledge about the quality of foods and their relationship to consumers’ choices. Alcohols, aldehydes, acids, esters, terpenes, pyrazines, and furans are the main chemical groups that are involved [...] Read more.
The evaluation of volatiles in food is an important aspect of food production. It gives knowledge about the quality of foods and their relationship to consumers’ choices. Alcohols, aldehydes, acids, esters, terpenes, pyrazines, and furans are the main chemical groups that are involved in aroma formation. They are products of food processing: thermal treatment, fermentation, storage, etc. Food aroma is a mixture of varied molecules. Because of this, the analysis of aroma composition can be challenging. The four main steps can be distinguished in the evaluation of the volatiles in the food matrix as follows: (1) isolation and concentration; (2) separation; (3) identification; and (4) sensory characterization. The most commonly used techniques to separate a fraction of volatiles from non-volatiles are solid-phase micro-(SPME) and stir bar sorptive extractions (SBSE). However, to study the active components of food aroma by gas chromatography with olfactometry detector (GC-O), solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE) is used. The volatiles are mostly separated on GC systems (GC or comprehensive two-dimensional GCxGC) with the support of mass spectrometry (MS, MS/MS, ToF–MS) for chemical compound identification. Besides omics techniques, the promising part could be a study of aroma using electronic nose. Therefore, the main assumptions of volatolomics are here described. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identification and Analysis of Compounds in Food Samples)
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