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Special Issue "Amperometric Biosensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Roberto Pilloton

1st Researcher at CNR Institute for Atmospheric Pollution CNR - Via Salaria km 29, 300, Monterotondo, Rome, Italy
E-Mail
Interests: electrochemistry, environmental analytical chemistry; biosensors; sensors and sensing; continuous flow monitoring; immobilization techniques; enzyme inhibitors; lab on a chip; nanostructured electrodes; screen printed electrodes; herbicides; pesticides; phenolic compounds; cholinesterases; photosystem II; laccase; tyrosinase; immobilized cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

More than 50 years ago, Clark and Lyons created the first biosensor: a glucose amperometric sensor. They coupled a Clark amperometric sensor for dissolved oxygen with an enzyme, glucose oxidase, which was immobilized on the tip of the electrode with a cellophane membrane. This method of bio-quantitative-assaying was simple, quick, and cheap. In subsequent pioneering years, the assay was extensively and profitably developed for diabetes monitoring.

Since that time, many improvements and applications were developed to not only increase the analytical performance of these amperometric biosensors, but also to prolong the lifetime of several immobilized biological molecules. Developments concerned such molecules’ oriented immobilization, the miniaturization of transducers, and automated, long-term monitoring applications with respect to several fields, which range from medicine, to environmental science and food quality studies.

Currently, improvements in amperometric biosensors mainly concern new materials for disposable electrodes, their deposition techniques (i.e., screen and ink-jet printing) and nanostructures (i.e., nanoelectrode ensembles), engineered sensing biological molecules, their electrochemical addressing and reversible and oriented immobilization, micro-fluidic devices, and Lab-on-a-Chip devices. These improvements reflect the cross interaction of several disciplines and technologies, which range from (without being exhaustive) chemistry, biology, physics, and molecular biology, to nanotechnology, micro-fabrication, and electronic engineering.

This Special Issue aims to bring together articles discussing innovative applications of amperometric biosensors, and to share the benefit of these new ideas and concepts, which are employed in multiple fields, with authors and readers of the journal, who have varying interests.

Both review articles and original research papers relating to the application of amperometric biosensors are solicited.

Dr. Roberto Pilloton
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access bimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • amperometric biosensors
  • nanostructured particles and electrodes
  • carbon nanotubes and graphene
  • engineered molecules or microorganisms
  • continuous flow monitoring
  • immobilization techniques
  • lab on a chip
  • screen printed electrode

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Effect of Nanoparticles on Modified Screen Printed Inhibition Superoxide Dismutase Electrodes for Aluminum
Sensors 2016, 16(10), 1588; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16101588
Received: 26 July 2016 / Revised: 10 September 2016 / Accepted: 20 September 2016 / Published: 26 September 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (5291 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A novel amperometric biosensor for the determination of Al(III) based on the inhibition of the enzyme superoxide dismutase has been developed. The oxidation signal of epinephrine substrate was affected by the presence of Al(III) ions leading to a decrease in its amperometric current.
[...] Read more.
A novel amperometric biosensor for the determination of Al(III) based on the inhibition of the enzyme superoxide dismutase has been developed. The oxidation signal of epinephrine substrate was affected by the presence of Al(III) ions leading to a decrease in its amperometric current. The immobilization of the enzyme was performed with glutaraldehyde on screen-printed carbon electrodes modifiedwith tetrathiofulvalene (TTF) and different types ofnanoparticles. Nanoparticles of gold, platinum, rhodium and palladium were deposited on screen printed carbon electrodes by means of two electrochemical procedures. Nanoparticles were characterized trough scanning electronic microscopy, X-rays fluorescence, and atomic force microscopy. Palladium nanoparticles showed lower atomic force microscopy parameters and higher slope of aluminum calibration curves and were selected to perform sensor validation. The developed biosensor has a detection limit of 2.0 ± 0.2 μM for Al(III), with a reproducibility of 7.9% (n = 5). Recovery of standard reference material spiked to buffer solution was 103.8% with a relative standard deviation of 4.8% (n = 5). Recovery of tap water spiked with the standard reference material was 100.5 with a relative standard deviation of 3.4% (n = 3). The study of interfering ions has also been carried out. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amperometric Biosensors)
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Open AccessArticle Bioethanol in Biofuels Checked by an Amperometric Organic Phase Enzyme Electrode (OPEE) Working in “Substrate Antagonism” Format
Sensors 2016, 16(9), 1355; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16091355
Received: 15 July 2016 / Revised: 16 August 2016 / Accepted: 17 August 2016 / Published: 25 August 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1171 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The bioethanol content of two samples of biofuels was determined directly, after simple dilution in decane, by means of an amperometric catalase enzyme biosensor working in the organic phase, based on substrate antagonisms format. The results were good from the point of view
[...] Read more.
The bioethanol content of two samples of biofuels was determined directly, after simple dilution in decane, by means of an amperometric catalase enzyme biosensor working in the organic phase, based on substrate antagonisms format. The results were good from the point of view of accuracy, and satisfactory for what concerns the recovery test by the standard addition method. Limit of detection (LOD) was on the order of 2.5 × 10−5 M. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amperometric Biosensors)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Amperometric Non-Enzymatic Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor Based on Aligned Zinc Oxide Nanorods
Sensors 2016, 16(7), 1004; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16071004
Received: 28 April 2016 / Revised: 14 June 2016 / Accepted: 15 June 2016 / Published: 29 June 2016
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (962 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) have been synthesized via the hydrothermal process. The NRs were grown over a conductive glass substrate. A non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), based on the prepared ZnO NRs, was examined through the
[...] Read more.
Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) have been synthesized via the hydrothermal process. The NRs were grown over a conductive glass substrate. A non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), based on the prepared ZnO NRs, was examined through the use of current-voltage measurements. The measured currents, as a function of H2O2 concentrations ranging from 10 μM to 700 μM, revealed two distinct behaviours and good performance, with a lower detection limit (LOD) of 42 μM for the low range of H2O2 concentrations (first region), and a LOD of 143.5 μM for the higher range of H2O2 concentrations (second region). The prepared ZnO NRs show excellent electrocatalytic activity. This enables a measurable and stable output current. The results were correlated with the oxidation process of the H2O2 and revealed a good performance for the ZnO NR non-enzymatic H2O2 sensor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amperometric Biosensors)
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Open AccessArticle A Micro-Platinum Wire Biosensor for Fast and Selective Detection of Alanine Aminotransferase
Sensors 2016, 16(6), 767; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16060767
Received: 21 April 2016 / Revised: 20 May 2016 / Accepted: 23 May 2016 / Published: 26 May 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2590 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, a miniaturized biosensor based on permselective polymer layers (overoxidized polypyrrole (Ppy) and Nafion®) modified and enzyme (glutamate oxidase (GlutOx)) immobilized micro-platinum wire electrode for the detection of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was fabricated. The proposed ALT biosensor was measured
[...] Read more.
In this study, a miniaturized biosensor based on permselective polymer layers (overoxidized polypyrrole (Ppy) and Nafion®) modified and enzyme (glutamate oxidase (GlutOx)) immobilized micro-platinum wire electrode for the detection of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was fabricated. The proposed ALT biosensor was measured electrochemically by constant potential amperometry at +0.7 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The ALT biosensor provides fast response time (~5 s) and superior selectivity towards ALT against both negatively and positively charged species (e.g., ascorbic acid (AA) and dopamine (DA), respectively). The detection range of the ALT biosensor is found to be 10–900 U/L which covers the range of normal ALT levels presented in the serum and the detection limit and sensitivity are found to be 8.48 U/L and 0.059 nA/(U/L·mm2) (N = 10), respectively. We also found that one-day storage of the ALT biosensor at −20 °C right after the sensor being fabricated can enhance the sensor sensitivity (1.74 times higher than that of the sensor stored at 4 °C). The ALT biosensor is stable after eight weeks of storage at −20 °C. The sensor was tested in spiked ALT samples (ALT activities: 20, 200, 400, and 900 U/L) and reasonable recoveries (70%~107%) were obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amperometric Biosensors)
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Open AccessArticle A Novel Conductive Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-BSA Film for the Construction of a Durable HRP Biosensor Modified with NanoAu Particles
Sensors 2016, 16(3), 374; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16030374
Received: 5 January 2016 / Revised: 4 March 2016 / Accepted: 7 March 2016 / Published: 15 March 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3596 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, we have investigated the contribution of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to the durability of the electrochemically synthesized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) film on a platinum (Pt) electrode. The electrode was capable to effectively adsorb the nano Au particles (AuNPs) to form a
[...] Read more.
In this study, we have investigated the contribution of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to the durability of the electrochemically synthesized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) film on a platinum (Pt) electrode. The electrode was capable to effectively adsorb the nano Au particles (AuNPs) to form a uniform layout, which was then able to immobilize the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to construct a functional HRP/AuNPs/PEDOT(BSA)/Pt biosensor. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to evaluate the performance of the biosensor through the measurement of hydrogen peroxide. Our results revealed a satisfied linear correlation between the cathodic current and the concentration of H2O2. Furthermore, the addition of oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, or NAD+, as the electron transfer mediator in the detection solution could dramatically enhance the sensitivity of detection by about 35.5%. The main advantages of the current biosensor are its durability, sensitivity, reliability, and biocompatibility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amperometric Biosensors)
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