sensors-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Fiber Optic Sensors With Plasmonic Nanostructures and Gratings: Applications and New Perspectives

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2021) | Viewed by 18678

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CICECO-Aveiro Institute of Materials, Physics Department, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: photonics; optics for aerospace; optical sensors; optical devices; machine learning for optics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Physics Division, Department of Applied Sciences, National Institute of Technology Delhi, Narela, Delhi 110040, India
Interests: fiber optics; sensors; plasmon; nanostructures
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in thin metal films, metallic/dielectric nanostructures, and corrugated grating structures have been explored enormously for designing optical sensors for sensing chemical, biological, and physical parameters. However, it was the introduction of optical fibers in SPR sensing nearly three decades ago that led to the crucial developments in achieving flexible and robust fiber optic SPR sensors for more intricate applications, such as remote (long-distance) sensing, gas sensing, and biomedical applications. In this context, diverse plasmonic nanostructures (e.g., metallic and dielectric material gratings) and corrugations on optical fibers, fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), long period gratings (LPGs), and microstructured (or photonic crystal) fibers have also been explored in order to attain a significant enhancement in the plasmonic fiber sensing performance. The scope of various phenomena/materials, such as rainbow trapping, optimum radiation damping, molecular imprinted polymers (MIP), absorption-enhancing materials, 2D materials, and infrared fibers is very high in the above-mentioned plasmonics-based fiber sensors.

We welcome submissions from any area of optical fiber sensors, with plasmonic nanostructures and gratings emphasizing novel engineering results and theoretical contributions. Original research papers, short communications, letters, and review articles are welcome. We would also appreciate receiving the tentative title of your contribution.

Dr. Carlos Marques
Dr. Anuj K. Sharma
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optical fiber
  • Plasmonic nanostructures
  • Fiber Bragg grating (FBG)
  • Long period grating (LPG)
  • Bio-sensors
  • Grating
  • Corrugation
  • Microstructured fiber
  • Photonic crystal fiber
  • Nanostructure

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

16 pages, 1417 KiB  
Article
Bloch Surface Wave Resonance Based Sensors as an Alternative to Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors
by Michal Gryga, Dalibor Ciprian and Petr Hlubina
Sensors 2020, 20(18), 5119; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20185119 - 08 Sep 2020
Cited by 36 | Viewed by 3504
Abstract
We report on a highly sensitive measurement of the relative humidity (RH) of moist air using both the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and Bloch surface wave resonance (BSWR). Both resonances are resolved in the Kretschmann configuration when the wavelength interrogation method is utilized. [...] Read more.
We report on a highly sensitive measurement of the relative humidity (RH) of moist air using both the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and Bloch surface wave resonance (BSWR). Both resonances are resolved in the Kretschmann configuration when the wavelength interrogation method is utilized. The SPR is revealed for a multilayer plasmonic structure of SF10/Cr/Au, while the BSWR is resolved for a multilayer dielectric structure (MDS) comprising four bilayers of TiO2/SiO2 with a rough termination layer of TiO2. The SPR effect is manifested by a dip in the reflectance of a p-polarized wave, and a shift of the dip with the change in the RH, or equivalently with the change in the refractive index of moist air is revealed, giving a sensitivity in a range of 0.042–0.072 nm/%RH. The BSWR effect is manifested by a dip in the reflectance of the spectral interference of s- and p-polarized waves, which represents an effective approach in resolving the resonance with maximum depth. For the MDS under study, the BSWRs were resolved within two band gaps, and for moist air we obtained sensitivities of 0.021–0.038 nm/%RH and 0.046–0.065 nm/%RH, respectively. We also revealed that the SPR based RH measurement is with the figure of merit (FOM) up to 4.7 × 10−4 %RH1, while BSWR based measurements have FOMs as high as 3.0 × 103 %RH1 and 1.1 × 10−3 %RH1, respectively. The obtained spectral interferometry based results demonstrate that the BSWR based sensor employing the available MDS has a similar sensitivity as the SPR based sensor, but outperforms it in the FOM. BSW based sensors employing dielectrics thus represent an effective alternative with a number of advantages, including better mechanical and chemical stability than metal films used in SPR sensing. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 4621 KiB  
Article
Experimental Investigation of the Dielectric Constants of Thin Noble Metallic Films Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor
by Longbiao Tao, Shuo Deng, Hongyun Gao, Haifei Lv, Xiaoyan Wen and Min Li
Sensors 2020, 20(5), 1505; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20051505 - 09 Mar 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2775
Abstract
Gold and silver have an extremely low refractive index value of about 0.04 in the visible to near infrared (NIR) regions, and this induces a relative error of about 50% in refractive index measurements. This can lead to a large uncertainty in the [...] Read more.
Gold and silver have an extremely low refractive index value of about 0.04 in the visible to near infrared (NIR) regions, and this induces a relative error of about 50% in refractive index measurements. This can lead to a large uncertainty in the imaginary part of the dielectric constants. A large difference exists between the experimental results and the classic models. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors, which use tens of nanometer thick noble metal film as the sensing layer, show ultra-high sensitivity (reaching 10−8 RIU) in this spectral range. As the spectral sensitivity and amplitude of SPR curves depend on the thickness and the dielectric constant of the sensing layer, we obtained high precision optical constants of the noble metal film using a multi-wavelength angle-modulated SPR sensing technology. The dielectric constant inferred from the parameters of the SPR curves, rather than from the refractive index and absorption ratio of noble metals, introduced a relative error within 10% of the resonance angle measurement. The measurement results demonstrate that the dielectric constants of gold and silver nano-films are more consistent with the widely used experimental results than with the classical theoretical model and always fall in the upper half of the imaginary part of the uncertainty range in the spectra of 500–900 nm. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

23 pages, 2003 KiB  
Review
Preparation and Application of Metal Nanoparticals Elaborated Fiber Sensors
by Jin Li, Haoru Wang, Zhi Li, Zhengcheng Su and Yue Zhu
Sensors 2020, 20(18), 5155; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20185155 - 10 Sep 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3690
Abstract
In recent years, surface plasmon resonance devices (SPR, or named plamonics) have attracted much more attention because of their great prospects in breaking through the optical diffraction limit and developing new photons and sensing devices. At the same time, the combination of SPR [...] Read more.
In recent years, surface plasmon resonance devices (SPR, or named plamonics) have attracted much more attention because of their great prospects in breaking through the optical diffraction limit and developing new photons and sensing devices. At the same time, the combination of SPR and optical fiber promotes the development of the compact micro-probes with high-performance and the integration of fiber and planar waveguide. Different from the long-range SPR of planar metal nano-films, the local-SPR (LSPR) effect can be excited by incident light on the surface of nano-scaled metal particles, resulting in local enhanced light field, i.e., optical hot spot. Metal nano-particles-modified optical fiber LSPR sensor has high sensitivity and compact structure, which can realize the real-time monitoring of physical parameters, environmental parameters (temperature, humidity), and biochemical molecules (pH value, gas-liquid concentration, protein molecules, viruses). In this paper, both fabrication and application of the metal nano-particles modified optical fiber LSPR sensor probe are reviewed, and its future development is predicted. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 4325 KiB  
Review
Surface Wave Enhanced Sensing in the Terahertz Spectral Range: Modalities, Materials, and Perspectives
by Mathieu Poulin, Steven Giannacopoulos and Maksim Skorobogatiy
Sensors 2019, 19(24), 5505; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19245505 - 13 Dec 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3748
Abstract
The terahertz spectral range (frequencies of 0.1–10 THz) has recently emerged as the next frontier in non-destructive imaging and sensing. Here, we review amplitude-based and phase-based sensing modalities in the context of the surface wave enhanced sensing in the terahertz frequency band. A [...] Read more.
The terahertz spectral range (frequencies of 0.1–10 THz) has recently emerged as the next frontier in non-destructive imaging and sensing. Here, we review amplitude-based and phase-based sensing modalities in the context of the surface wave enhanced sensing in the terahertz frequency band. A variety of surface waves are considered including surface plasmon polaritons on metals, semiconductors, and zero gap materials, surface phonon polaritons on polaritonic materials, Zenneck waves on high-k dielectrics, as well as spoof surface plasmons and spoof Zenneck waves on structured interfaces. Special attention is paid to the trade-off between surface wave localization and sensor sensitivity. Furthermore, a detailed theoretical analysis of the surface wave optical properties as well as the sensitivity of sensors based on such waves is supplemented with many examples related to naturally occurring and artificial materials. We believe our review can be of interest to scientists pursuing research in novel high-performance sensor designs operating at frequencies beyond the visible/IR band. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 2715 KiB  
Review
A Review: Evolution and Diversity of Optical Fibre Plasmonic Sensors
by Thomas Allsop and Ron Neal
Sensors 2019, 19(22), 4874; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19224874 - 08 Nov 2019
Cited by 45 | Viewed by 4271
Abstract
The purpose of this review is to bring to the attention of the wider research community how two quite different optical sensory techniques were integrated resulting in a sensor device of exceptional sensitivity with wide ranging capability. Both authors have collaborated over a [...] Read more.
The purpose of this review is to bring to the attention of the wider research community how two quite different optical sensory techniques were integrated resulting in a sensor device of exceptional sensitivity with wide ranging capability. Both authors have collaborated over a 20 year period, each researching initially surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and optical fibre Bragg grating devices. Our individual research, funded in part by EPSRC and industry into these two areas, converged, resulting in a device that combined the ultra-sensitive working platform of SPR behavior with that of fibre Bragg grating development, which provided a simple method for SPR excitation. During this period, they developed a new approach to the fabrication of nano-structured metal coatings for plasmonic devices and demonstrated on fibre optic platform, which has created an ultra-sensitive optical sensing platform. Both authors believe that the convergence of these two areas will create opportunities in detection and sensing yet to be realised. Furthermore, giving the reader “sign-post” research articles to help to construct models to design sensors and to understand their experimental results. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop