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Special Issue "Biosensors and Molecular Imprinting"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2017).

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Bo Mattiasson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Lund University, Box 117, 221 00 Lund, Sweden
Tel. +46 46 222 82 64
Interests: biotechnology; biochemistry; chromatographic techniques; environmental chemistry; biosensors; molecularly imprinted polymers
Dr. Gizem Ertürk
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Lund University, Box 117, 221 00 Lund, Sweden
Interests: biochemistry; biosensors; molecularly imprinted polymers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

One of the bottlenecks in applying biosensors for real-life applications, e.g., process monitoring or work at ambient temperature, is a lack of stability of the used biorecognition elements, such as antibodies, receptors, enzymes, etc.

Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) represent an attractive way to circumvent many of the obstacles connected to use of biorecognition elements. This Special Issue is devoted to covering MIP-based “bio”-sensors.

MIPs are said to be selective, stable, and represent good binding properties. These aspects are going to be highlighted in this Special Issue, which will cover different aspects of modes to produce MIPs, different sensor configurations, and in a range of different applications. Some reviews constitute the backbone of the Special Issue, and there is room for many regular research papers, as well as mini reports (provided they do not overlap too much with the planned reviews).

Prof. Dr. Bo Mattiasson
Dr. Gizem Ertürk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biosensors
  • Molecularly imprinted polymers
  • Biorecognition elements

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Why Using Molecularly Imprinted Polymers in Connection to Biosensors?
Sensors 2017, 17(2), 246; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17020246 - 27 Jan 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
The area of biosensor-oriented research has grown rapidly during recent years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors and Molecular Imprinting) Printed Edition available
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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Microcontact Imprinted Plasmonic Nanosensors: Powerful Tools in the Detection of Salmonella paratyphi
Sensors 2017, 17(6), 1375; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17061375 - 13 Jun 2017
Cited by 9
Abstract
Identification of pathogenic microorganisms by traditional methods is slow and cumbersome. Therefore, the focus today is on developing new and quicker analytical methods. In this study, a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensor with a microcontact imprinted sensor chip was developed for detecting Salmonella [...] Read more.
Identification of pathogenic microorganisms by traditional methods is slow and cumbersome. Therefore, the focus today is on developing new and quicker analytical methods. In this study, a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensor with a microcontact imprinted sensor chip was developed for detecting Salmonella paratyphi. For this purpose, the stamps of the target microorganism were prepared and then, microcontact S. paratyphi-imprinted SPR chips were prepared with the functional monomer N-methacryloyl-L-histidine methyl ester (MAH). Characterization studies of the SPR chips were carried out with ellipsometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The real-time Salmonella paratyphi detection was performed within the range of 2.5 × 106–15 × 106 CFU/mL. Selectivity of the prepared sensors was examined by using competing bacterial strains such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The imprinting efficiency of the prepared sensor system was determined by evaluating the responses of the SPR chips prepared with both molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) and non-imprinted polymers (NIPs). Real sample experiments were performed with apple juice. The recognition of Salmonella paratyphi was achieved using these SPR sensor with a detection limit of 1.4 × 106 CFU/mL. In conclusion, SPR sensor has the potential to serve as an excellent candidate for monitoring Salmonella paratyphi in food supplies or contaminated water and clearly makes it possible to develop rapid and appropriate control strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors and Molecular Imprinting) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
Ultratrace Detection of Histamine Using a Molecularly-Imprinted Polymer-Based Voltammetric Sensor
Sensors 2017, 17(3), 645; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17030645 - 21 Mar 2017
Cited by 17
Abstract
Rapid and cost-effective analysis of histamine, in food, environmental, and diagnostics research has been of interest recently. However, for certain applications, the already-existing biological receptor-based sensing methods have usage limits in terms of stability and costs. As a result, robust and cost-effective imprinted [...] Read more.
Rapid and cost-effective analysis of histamine, in food, environmental, and diagnostics research has been of interest recently. However, for certain applications, the already-existing biological receptor-based sensing methods have usage limits in terms of stability and costs. As a result, robust and cost-effective imprinted polymeric receptors can be the best alternative. In the present work, molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIPs) for histamine were synthesized using methacrylic acid in chloroform and acetonitrile as two different porogens. The binding affinity of the MIPs with histamine was evaluated in aqueous media. MIPs synthesized in chloroform displayed better imprinting properties for histamine. We demonstrate here histamine MIPs incorporated into a carbon paste (CP) electrode as a MIP-CP electrode sensor platforms for detection of histamine. This simple sensor format allows accurate determination of histamine in the sub-nanomolar range using an electrochemical method. The sensor exhibited two distinct linear response ranges of 1 × 10−10–7 × 10−9 M and 7 × 10−9–4 × 10−7 M. The detection limit of the sensor was calculated equal to 7.4 × 10−11 M. The specificity of the proposed electrode for histamine is demonstrated by using the analogous molecules and other neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, etc. The MIP sensor was investigated with success on spiked serum samples. The easy preparation, simple procedure, and low production cost make the MIP sensor attractive for selective and sensitive detection of analytes, even in less-equipped laboratories with minimal training. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors and Molecular Imprinting) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
A Microfluidic DNA Sensor Based on Three-Dimensional (3D) Hierarchical MoS2/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites
Sensors 2016, 16(11), 1911; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16111911 - 14 Nov 2016
Cited by 5
Abstract
In this work, we present a novel microfluidic biosensor for sensitive fluorescence detection of DNA based on 3D architectural MoS2/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposites. The proposed platform exhibits a high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability with a visible manner and operation simplicity. [...] Read more.
In this work, we present a novel microfluidic biosensor for sensitive fluorescence detection of DNA based on 3D architectural MoS2/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposites. The proposed platform exhibits a high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability with a visible manner and operation simplicity. The excellent fluorescence quenching stability of a MoS2/MWCNT aqueous solution coupled with microfluidics will greatly simplify experimental steps and reduce time for large-scale DNA detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors and Molecular Imprinting) Printed Edition available
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Gas Sensors Based on Molecular Imprinting Technology
Sensors 2017, 17(7), 1567; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17071567 - 04 Jul 2017
Cited by 10
Abstract
Molecular imprinting technology (MIT); often described as a method of designing a material to remember a target molecular structure (template); is a technique for the creation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with custom-made binding sites complementary to the target molecules in shape; size [...] Read more.
Molecular imprinting technology (MIT); often described as a method of designing a material to remember a target molecular structure (template); is a technique for the creation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with custom-made binding sites complementary to the target molecules in shape; size and functional groups. MIT has been successfully applied to analyze; separate and detect macromolecular organic compounds. Furthermore; it has been increasingly applied in assays of biological macromolecules. Owing to its unique features of structure specificity; predictability; recognition and universal application; there has been exploration of the possible application of MIPs in the field of highly selective gas sensors. In this present study; we outline the recent advances in gas sensors based on MIT; classify and introduce the existing molecularly imprinted gas sensors; summarize their advantages and disadvantages; and analyze further research directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors and Molecular Imprinting) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Molecular Imprinting of Macromolecules for Sensor Applications
Sensors 2017, 17(4), 898; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17040898 - 19 Apr 2017
Cited by 30
Abstract
Molecular recognition has an important role in numerous living systems. One of the most important molecular recognition methods is molecular imprinting, which allows host compounds to recognize and detect several molecules rapidly, sensitively and selectively. Compared to natural systems, molecular imprinting methods have [...] Read more.
Molecular recognition has an important role in numerous living systems. One of the most important molecular recognition methods is molecular imprinting, which allows host compounds to recognize and detect several molecules rapidly, sensitively and selectively. Compared to natural systems, molecular imprinting methods have some important features such as low cost, robustness, high recognition ability and long term durability which allows molecularly imprinted polymers to be used in various biotechnological applications, such as chromatography, drug delivery, nanotechnology, and sensor technology. Sensors are important tools because of their ability to figure out a potentially large number of analytical difficulties in various areas with different macromolecular targets. Proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, antibodies, viruses and cells are defined as macromolecules that have wide range of functions are very important. Thus, macromolecules detection has gained great attention in concerning the improvement in most of the studies. The applications of macromolecule imprinted sensors will have a spacious exploration according to the low cost, high specificity and stability. In this review, macromolecules for molecularly imprinted sensor applications are structured according to the definition of molecular imprinting methods, developments in macromolecular imprinting methods, macromolecular imprinted sensors, and conclusions and future perspectives. This chapter follows the latter strategies and focuses on the applications of macromolecular imprinted sensors. This allows discussion on how sensor strategy is brought to solve the macromolecules imprinting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors and Molecular Imprinting) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessReview
Imprinting of Microorganisms for Biosensor Applications
Sensors 2017, 17(4), 708; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17040708 - 29 Mar 2017
Cited by 8
Abstract
There is a growing need for selective recognition of microorganisms in complex samples due to the rapidly emerging importance of detecting them in various matrices. Most of the conventional methods used to identify microorganisms are time-consuming, laborious and expensive. In recent years, many [...] Read more.
There is a growing need for selective recognition of microorganisms in complex samples due to the rapidly emerging importance of detecting them in various matrices. Most of the conventional methods used to identify microorganisms are time-consuming, laborious and expensive. In recent years, many efforts have been put forth to develop alternative methods for the detection of microorganisms. These methods include use of various components such as silica nanoparticles, microfluidics, liquid crystals, carbon nanotubes which could be integrated with sensor technology in order to detect microorganisms. In many of these publications antibodies were used as recognition elements by means of specific interactions between the target cell and the binding site of the antibody for the purpose of cell recognition and detection. Even though natural antibodies have high selectivity and sensitivity, they have limited stability and tend to denature in conditions outside the physiological range. Among different approaches, biomimetic materials having superior properties have been used in creating artificial systems. Molecular imprinting is a well suited technique serving the purpose to develop highly selective sensing devices. Molecularly imprinted polymers defined as artificial recognition elements are of growing interest for applications in several sectors of life science involving the investigations on detecting molecules of specific interest. These polymers have attractive properties such as high bio-recognition capability, mechanical and chemical stability, easy preparation and low cost which make them superior over natural recognition reagents. This review summarizes the recent advances in the detection and quantification of microorganisms by emphasizing the molecular imprinting technology and its applications in the development of sensor strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors and Molecular Imprinting) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessReview
Molecular Imprinting Applications in Forensic Science
Sensors 2017, 17(4), 691; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17040691 - 28 Mar 2017
Cited by 6
Abstract
Producing molecular imprinting-based materials has received increasing attention due to recognition selectivity, stability, cast effectiveness, and ease of production in various forms for a wide range of applications. The molecular imprinting technique has a variety of applications in the areas of the food [...] Read more.
Producing molecular imprinting-based materials has received increasing attention due to recognition selectivity, stability, cast effectiveness, and ease of production in various forms for a wide range of applications. The molecular imprinting technique has a variety of applications in the areas of the food industry, environmental monitoring, and medicine for diverse purposes like sample pretreatment, sensing, and separation/purification. A versatile usage, stability and recognition capabilities also make them perfect candidates for use in forensic sciences. Forensic science is a demanding area and there is a growing interest in molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in this field. In this review, recent molecular imprinting applications in the related areas of forensic sciences are discussed while considering the literature of last two decades. Not only direct forensic applications but also studies of possible forensic value were taken into account like illicit drugs, banned sport drugs, effective toxins and chemical warfare agents in a review of over 100 articles. The literature was classified according to targets, material shapes, production strategies, detection method, and instrumentation. We aimed to summarize the current applications of MIPs in forensic science and put forth a projection of their potential uses as promising alternatives for benchmark competitors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors and Molecular Imprinting) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessReview
Imprinting Technology in Electrochemical Biomimetic Sensors
Sensors 2017, 17(3), 523; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17030523 - 06 Mar 2017
Cited by 15
Abstract
Biosensors are a promising tool offering the possibility of low cost and fast analytical screening in point-of-care diagnostics and for on-site detection in the field. Most biosensors in routine use ensure their selectivity/specificity by including natural receptors as biorecognition element. These materials are [...] Read more.
Biosensors are a promising tool offering the possibility of low cost and fast analytical screening in point-of-care diagnostics and for on-site detection in the field. Most biosensors in routine use ensure their selectivity/specificity by including natural receptors as biorecognition element. These materials are however too expensive and hard to obtain for every biochemical molecule of interest in environmental and clinical practice. Molecularly imprinted polymers have emerged through time as an alternative to natural antibodies in biosensors. In theory, these materials are stable and robust, presenting much higher capacity to resist to harsher conditions of pH, temperature, pressure or organic solvents. In addition, these synthetic materials are much cheaper than their natural counterparts while offering equivalent affinity and sensitivity in the molecular recognition of the target analyte. Imprinting technology and biosensors have met quite recently, relying mostly on electrochemical detection and enabling a direct reading of different analytes, while promoting significant advances in various fields of use. Thus, this review encompasses such developments and describes a general overview for building promising biomimetic materials as biorecognition elements in electrochemical sensors. It includes different molecular imprinting strategies such as the choice of polymer material, imprinting methodology and assembly on the transduction platform. Their interface with the most recent nanostructured supports acting as standard conductive materials within electrochemical biomimetic sensors is pointed out. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors and Molecular Imprinting) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Molecular Imprinting Technology in Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) Sensors
Sensors 2017, 17(3), 454; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17030454 - 24 Feb 2017
Cited by 24
Abstract
Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as artificial antibodies have received considerable scientific attention in the past years in the field of (bio)sensors since they have unique features that distinguish them from natural antibodies such as robustness, multiple binding sites, low cost, facile preparation and [...] Read more.
Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as artificial antibodies have received considerable scientific attention in the past years in the field of (bio)sensors since they have unique features that distinguish them from natural antibodies such as robustness, multiple binding sites, low cost, facile preparation and high stability under extreme operation conditions (higher pH and temperature values, etc.). On the other hand, the Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) is an analytical tool based on the measurement of small mass changes on the sensor surface. QCM sensors are practical and convenient monitoring tools because of their specificity, sensitivity, high accuracy, stability and reproducibility. QCM devices are highly suitable for converting the recognition process achieved using MIP-based memories into a sensor signal. Therefore, the combination of a QCM and MIPs as synthetic receptors enhances the sensitivity through MIP process-based multiplexed binding sites using size, 3D-shape and chemical function having molecular memories of the prepared sensor system toward the target compound to be detected. This review aims to highlight and summarize the recent progress and studies in the field of (bio)sensor systems based on QCMs combined with molecular imprinting technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors and Molecular Imprinting) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Capacitive Biosensors and Molecularly Imprinted Electrodes
Sensors 2017, 17(2), 390; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17020390 - 17 Feb 2017
Cited by 13
Abstract
Capacitive biosensors belong to the group of affinity biosensors that operate by registering direct binding between the sensor surface and the target molecule. This type of biosensors measures the changes in dielectric properties and/or thickness of the dielectric layer at the electrolyte/electrode interface. [...] Read more.
Capacitive biosensors belong to the group of affinity biosensors that operate by registering direct binding between the sensor surface and the target molecule. This type of biosensors measures the changes in dielectric properties and/or thickness of the dielectric layer at the electrolyte/electrode interface. Capacitive biosensors have so far been successfully used for detection of proteins, nucleotides, heavy metals, saccharides, small organic molecules and microbial cells. In recent years, the microcontact imprinting method has been used to create very sensitive and selective biorecognition cavities on surfaces of capacitive electrodes. This chapter summarizes the principle and different applications of capacitive biosensors with an emphasis on microcontact imprinting method with its recent capacitive biosensor applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors and Molecular Imprinting) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessReview
Molecular Imprinting Techniques Used for the Preparation of Biosensors
Sensors 2017, 17(2), 288; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17020288 - 04 Feb 2017
Cited by 39
Abstract
Molecular imprinting is the technology of creating artificial recognition sites in polymeric matrices which are complementary to the template in their size, shape and spatial arrangement of the functional groups. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) and their incorporation with various transducer platforms are among [...] Read more.
Molecular imprinting is the technology of creating artificial recognition sites in polymeric matrices which are complementary to the template in their size, shape and spatial arrangement of the functional groups. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) and their incorporation with various transducer platforms are among the most promising approaches for detection of several analytes. There are a variety of molecular imprinting techniques used for the preparation of biomimetic sensors including bulk imprinting, surface imprinting (soft lithography, template immobilization, grafting, emulsion polymerization) and epitope imprinting. This chapter presents an overview of all of these techniques with examples from particular publications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors and Molecular Imprinting) Printed Edition available
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