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Capacitive and Impedance-Based Biosensors

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2022) | Viewed by 5469

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Division of Biotechnology, Lund University, Box 117, 221 00 Lund, Sweden
Interests: bio-separation; immobilized enzymes; environmental biotechnology; extremophilic microorganisms; biosensors; immune-analysis and molecularly imprinted polymers
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Capacitive and impedance biosensors belong to the group of label-free affinity biosensors. This type of biosensors measures changes in dielectric properties and/or thickness of the dielectric layer at the electrolyte/electrode interface. Capacitive biosensors have been successfully used for the detection of proteins, nucleotides, heavy metal ions, saccharides, small organic molecules, and microbial cells so far. The concentration range where this type of sensors can operate is from 10–17 M up to 10–2 M. The affinity capture was initially based on the use of antibodies and other biomolecules. In recent years, the molecular imprinting method has been used to create very sensitive and selective biorecognition cavities on the surfaces of capacitive gold electrodes. This Special Issue summarizes the principles of the two biosensor types and different applications of capacitive biosensors and impedance-based units in health care, environmental monitoring, food quality analysis, etc., and molecular imprinting is expanding with its recent capacitive biosensor applications.

Prof. Dr. Bo Mattiasson
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • capacitive biosensors
  • affinity biosensors
  • microcontact imprinting

Published Papers (2 papers)

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15 pages, 1905 KiB  
Article
A Sensitive Capacitive Biosensor for Protein a Detection Using Human IgG Immobilized on an Electrode Using Layer-by-Layer Applied Gold Nanoparticles
by Kosin Teeparuksapun, Martin Hedström and Bo Mattiasson
Sensors 2022, 22(1), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/s22010099 - 24 Dec 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2830
Abstract
A capacitive biosensor for the detection of protein A was developed. Gold electrodes were fabricated by thermal evaporation and patterned by photoresist photolithography. A layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of thiourea (TU) and HAuCl4 and chemical reduction was utilized to prepare a probe with [...] Read more.
A capacitive biosensor for the detection of protein A was developed. Gold electrodes were fabricated by thermal evaporation and patterned by photoresist photolithography. A layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of thiourea (TU) and HAuCl4 and chemical reduction was utilized to prepare a probe with a different number of layers of TU and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The LbL-modified electrodes were used for the immobilization of human IgG. The binding interaction between human IgG and protein A was detected as a decrease in capacitance signal, and that change was used to investigate the correlation between the height of the LbL probe and the sensitivity of the capacitive measurement. The results showed that the initial increase in length of the LbL probe can enhance the amount of immobilized human IgG, leading to a more sensitive assay. However, with thicker LbL layers, a reduction of the sensitivity of the measurement was registered. The performance of the developed system under optimum set-up showed a linearity in response from 1 × 10−16 to 1 × 10−13 M, with the limit detection of 9.1 × 10−17 M, which could be interesting for the detection of trace amounts of protein A from affinity isolation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Capacitive and Impedance-Based Biosensors)
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17 pages, 3644 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Polytyramine Film and 6-Mercaptohexanol Self-Assembled Monolayers as the Immobilization Layers for a Capacitive DNA Sensor Chip: A Comparison
by Ally Mahadhy, Bo Mattiasson, Eva StåhlWernersson and Martin Hedström
Sensors 2021, 21(23), 8149; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21238149 - 6 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2108
Abstract
The performance of a biosensor is associated with the properties of an immobilization layer on a sensor chip. In this study, gold sensor chips were modified with two different immobilization layers, polytyramine film and 6-mercaptohexanol self-assembled monolayer. The physical, electrochemical and analytical properties [...] Read more.
The performance of a biosensor is associated with the properties of an immobilization layer on a sensor chip. In this study, gold sensor chips were modified with two different immobilization layers, polytyramine film and 6-mercaptohexanol self-assembled monolayer. The physical, electrochemical and analytical properties of polytyramine film and mercaptohexanol self-assembled monolayer modified gold sensor chips were studied and compared. The study was conducted using atomic force microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and a capacitive DNA-sensor system (CapSenze™ Biosystem). The results obtained by atomic force microscopy and cyclic voltammetry indicate that polytyramine film on the sensor chip surface possesses better insulating properties and provides more spaces for the immobilization of the capture probe than a mercaptohexanol self-assembled monolayer. A capacitive DNA sensor hosting a polytyramine single-stranded DNA-modified sensor chip displayed higher sensitivity and larger signal amplitude than that of a mercaptohexanol single-stranded DNA-modified sensor chip. The linearity responses for polytyramine single-stranded DNA- and mercaptohexanol single-stranded DNA-modified sensor chips were obtained at log concentration ranges, equivalent to 10−12 to 10−8 M and 10−10 to 10−8 M, with detection limits of 4.0 × 10−13 M and 7.0 × 10−11 M of target complementary single-stranded DNA, respectively. Mercaptohexanol single-stranded DNA- and polytyramine single-stranded DNA-modified sensor chips exhibited a notable selectivity at an elevated hybridization temperature of 50 °C, albeit the signal amplitudes due to the hybridization of the target complementary single-stranded DNA were reduced by almost 20% and less than 5%, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Capacitive and Impedance-Based Biosensors)
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