Special Issue "Case Reports in Pediatrics"

A special issue of Reports (ISSN 2571-841X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jesús Devesa

Scientific Director of The Medical Center Foltra. Travesía de Montouto 24, 15886 TEO, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: growth hormone; growth hormone receptor; IGF-I; brain injury; stroke; cerebral palsy; hypoxia/ischemia; neurodegeneration; atherosclerosis; growth hormone and gonads; growth hormone and diabetes; growth hormone and cancer; growth hormone signaling pathway

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Children are particularly vulnerable subjects from a medical point of view. During embryonic and fetal development, a series of malformations and damages can occur that affect the brain in particular, or the entire organism in general. Birth can occur prematurely, with the consequent risk of the appearance of a periventricular leukomalacia, or births that produce a hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy may occur. After childbirth, there may be infections that cause widespread sepsis. During childhood, there can be all kinds of infections, particularly gastroenteritis, lung diseases, meningitis, and kidney affections, that can put the patient´s life at risk. Resistance to antibiotics, the absence of vaccinations, vitamin deficiencies or inappropriate nutrition, allergies and asthma, brain trauma, and drowning, are common causes of disease and death. Genetic alterations that sometimes take time to manifest, are also increasingly present in the day to day medical field. Mitochondropathies are also a frequent cause of disease, which are, until now, incurable. From childhood, obesity, the early development of arteriosclerosis, and cardiovascular affectation have increasing incidence in the global population. These are just some examples that represent a challenge for medicine and education in general. Therefore, the need for better knowledge of childhood pathologies and the development of new therapeutic actions is growing.

For these reasons, researchers are invited to submit their original case reports for this Special Issue of Reports, entitled "Case Reports in Pediatrics", which will cover a selection of topics related to children’s pathologies and therapeutic possibilities.

Prof. Dr. Jesús Devesa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Reports is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessCase Report
Cyclical Fevers in a 4-year-old Boy with IgA Deficiency
Received: 10 March 2019 / Revised: 23 March 2019 / Accepted: 24 March 2019 / Published: 29 March 2019
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Abstract
While immunodeficiencies, such as (Immunoglobulin A) IgA deficiency, may predispose pediatric patients to respiratory illnesses, they are also associated with autoinflammatory conditions. Distinguishing between these possible complications requires an awareness of these uncommon conditions. We report a case of a four-year-old boy with [...] Read more.
While immunodeficiencies, such as (Immunoglobulin A) IgA deficiency, may predispose pediatric patients to respiratory illnesses, they are also associated with autoinflammatory conditions. Distinguishing between these possible complications requires an awareness of these uncommon conditions. We report a case of a four-year-old boy with a history of IgA deficiency presenting to his primary care provider with fever of one week’s duration accompanied by abdominal, ear, and throat pain. The patient’s mother reported that he had these symptoms twice a month for the prior ten months during which he occasionally developed oral ulcers. Between episodes, the patient fully recovered without complications. Considering the patient’s history of IgA deficiency, it was originally assumed that the patient had strep throat and coincidental resolution of his symptoms after initiation of antibiotic therapy supported this diagnosis. However, due to the recurrent nature of his symptoms, a preliminary diagnosis of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) was made. A referral to an otolaryngologist was made, and findings of adenopathy and tonsillitis suggestive of PFAPA were confirmed. The patient was scheduled for adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy, which were performed without complication, leading to the cessation of these episodes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Case Reports in Pediatrics)
Open AccessCase Report
Neonatal Intracranial Hemorrhage with a Dramatic Outcome Due to Maternal Anti CD36 Antibodies
Received: 10 January 2019 / Accepted: 1 February 2019 / Published: 5 February 2019
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Abstract
Fetal/neonatal allo-immune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) results from maternal immunization against fetal platelet-specific antigens (HPA) inherited from the father. Most cases involve HPA located on glycoproteins (GP) IbIX, IaIIa and IIbIIIa. Iso-immunizations can also occur in the absence of expression of membrane proteins, such as [...] Read more.
Fetal/neonatal allo-immune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) results from maternal immunization against fetal platelet-specific antigens (HPA) inherited from the father. Most cases involve HPA located on glycoproteins (GP) IbIX, IaIIa and IIbIIIa. Iso-immunizations can also occur in the absence of expression of membrane proteins, such as GPIIb or GPIIIa in Glanzmann patients. CD36 (also called glycoprotein GPIV) deficiency is observed in 3 to 5% of Asian and African populations. We report here the case of a 41-year-old Canadian woman originated from Africa, who delivered a male dead new-born at 39 weeks of gestation. A massive intracranial haemorrhage was identified as being the obvious cause of death. No platelet antibody against GPIbIX, IaIIa, and IIbIIIa was identified by the gold-standard Monoclonal Antibody-specific Immobilization of Platelet Antigens (MAIPA) assay. Surprisingly, anti CD36 iso-antibodies were identified in the maternal serum with a new bead-based multiplex assay. The CD36 gene was sequenced for both parents, and a mutation was identified on Exon 10 of the mother’s CD36 gene, which was absent for the father: NM_000072.3:c.975T>G inducing a STOP codon at position 325 of the mature protein. The absence of CD36 expression on the mother’s platelets was confirmed by flow cytometry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Case Reports in Pediatrics)
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Open AccessCase Report
Early Treatment with Growth Hormone (GH) and Rehabilitation Recovers Hearing in a Child with Cerebral Palsy
Received: 30 December 2018 / Revised: 20 January 2019 / Accepted: 24 January 2019 / Published: 24 January 2019
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Abstract
Neonatal hearing loss is one of the most common anomalies and is frequently associated with delivery problems. The effects of growth hormone (GH) on brain regeneration after an injury are well known. This paper looks at a male child diagnosed with cerebral palsy, [...] Read more.
Neonatal hearing loss is one of the most common anomalies and is frequently associated with delivery problems. The effects of growth hormone (GH) on brain regeneration after an injury are well known. This paper looks at a male child diagnosed with cerebral palsy, psychomotor affectation, left spastic hemiparesis, and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss after fetal distress due to ruptured membranes before the delivery of more than 30 hours of evolution and several episodes of severe hypoglycemia. From 3.5 months of age, we treated him with GH (0.04 mg/kg/day), Melatonin (5 mg/day and 6 months later 10 mg/day) and rehabilitation, for a period of 14 months; at discharge, the child fully recovered all the disabilities produced by his cerebral palsy, including normal hearing; GMFM-88 increased from 7.84% to 48.23%; Battelle scores increased from 2 to 9 after 7 months of treatment, and to 30, 1 year after discharge. Most likely hearing loss was recovered due to the effect of GH on the production of hair cells from stem cells (only present in very young children) in the cochlear sensory epithelium. This is the first case of recovery of hearing loss in humans after GH administration. Moreover, GH administration is useful and safe for early treatment of cerebral palsy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Case Reports in Pediatrics)
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