Special Issue "She Maps"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Karen Joyce
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Senior Lecturer - Remote Sensing and Spatial Sciences, College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD, 4870 Australia
Tel. +61 7 4232 1429
Interests: remote sensing; coral reefs; unmanned airborne systems
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Renee Bartolo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist, Department of Environment and Energy, Darwin, NT 0820, Australia
Interests: remote sensing; landscape ecology; drones; ecological restoration; ecological risk assessment; climate change impacts on tropical wetlands; mangrove mapping; tropical wetlands
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Ms. Sylvia Michael
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Independent Researcher, Australia
Tel. +61 417 759 544
Interests: remote sensing; satellite imagery; applications of remotely sensed imagery
Dr. Karen Anderson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn Campus, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK
Interests: Remote and proximal sensing; Laser scanning and waveform LiDAR; Field spectroscopy; Drone sensing; Structure-from-motion photogrammetry; Eco-hydrology; Vegetation structure; Mountain hydrology; Ecosystem services
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The United Nations recognises that all of their Sustainable Development Goals rely on achieving gender equality. It is a big call. But it is also something that will not happen without actively seeking to attain it.

One small aspect on the pathway to achieving equality is to recognise that despite having no innate cognitive differences, women are underrepresented in many scientific and technical fields, particularly in leadership roles. Furthermore, male authorship continues to dominate peer-reviewed literature. These two facts are intrinsically linked, as the volume of peer-reviewed publications plays an important role in career progression.

Rather than feeling overwhelmed by the enormity of changing the global statistics, let us change the trajectory within our own discipline. We know that publications within the Remote Sensing journal follow a broader pattern, with female authorship estimated at less than 25%. So, let us act on this and highlight the latest research in remote sensing theory and applications conducted by women around the world, reported on by our female experts. We can work towards changing the statistics of the journal, while also promoting the women who contribute to the science. This may seem like a small gesture, but from little things, big things grow.

We invite contributions with female lead-authors and encourage 50% female authorship, considering remote sensing applications, technology, theory, ethics, and science. We will use an inclusive definition of female to mean everyone who is significantly female-identified, regardless of gender identity.

Dr. Karen Joyce
Dr. Renee Bartolo
Ms. Sylvia Michael
Dr. Karen Anderson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Synthetic Aperture Radar Remote Sensing of Operational Platform Produced Water Releases
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(23), 2882; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11232882 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
Oil spill detection services based on satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) frequently detect oil slicks close to platforms due to legal releases of produced water. Separating these slicks from larger releases, e.g., due to accidental leakage is challenging. The aim of this work [...] Read more.
Oil spill detection services based on satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) frequently detect oil slicks close to platforms due to legal releases of produced water. Separating these slicks from larger releases, e.g., due to accidental leakage is challenging. The aim of this work is to investigate the SAR characteristics of produced water, including the typical appearance in HH/VV data, possible variations with oil volume, and limitations on detectability. The study is based on dual-polarization TerraSAR-X data collected with constant imaging geometry over one platform in the North Sea. Despite the low oil content (volume percentage of 0.001%–0.002% in this data set), produced water is clearly detectable, with median damping ratios around 3–9 dB. Produced water is detected here in wind speeds of 2–12 m/s, with reduced detectability above ca 9 m/s. Hourly average release volumes with an oil component as low as 0.003 m 3 are detected. The damping ratio, polarization difference, and co-polarization power ratio are investigated and show no clear correlation with released oil volume. However, some indications of trends such as increasing signal damping with oil volume should be further investigated when data over larger release volumes are available. When comparing the properties of the entire slick with the most recently released part, similar or slightly higher damping ratios were found in the full slick case. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue She Maps)
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Open AccessTechnical Note
Rapid and Accurate Monitoring of Intertidal Oyster Reef Habitat Using Unoccupied Aircraft Systems and Structure from Motion
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(20), 2394; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11202394 - 16 Oct 2019
Abstract
Oysters support an economically important fishery in many locations in the United States and provide benefits to the surrounding environment by filtering water, providing habitat for fish, and stabilizing shorelines. Changes in oyster reef health reflect variations in factors such as recreational and [...] Read more.
Oysters support an economically important fishery in many locations in the United States and provide benefits to the surrounding environment by filtering water, providing habitat for fish, and stabilizing shorelines. Changes in oyster reef health reflect variations in factors such as recreational and commercial harvests, predation, disease, storms, and broader anthropogenic influences, such as climate change. Consistent measurements of reef area and morphology can help effectively monitor oyster habitat across locations. However, traditional approaches to acquiring these data are time-consuming and can be costly. Unoccupied aircraft systems (UAS) present a rapid and reliable method for assessing oyster habitat that may overcome these limitations, although little information on the accuracy of platforms and processing techniques is available. In the present study, oyster reefs ranging in size from 30 m2 to 300 m2 were surveyed using both fixed-wing and multirotor UAS and compared with ground-based surveys of each reef conducted with a real-time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS). Survey images from UAS were processed using structure from motion (SfM) stereo photogrammetry techniques, with and without the use of ground control point (GCP) correction, to create reef-scale measures of area and morphology for comparison to ground-based measures. UAS-based estimates of both reef area and morphology were consistently lower than ground-based estimates, and the results of matched pairs analyses revealed that differences in reef area did not vary significantly by aircraft or the use of GCPs. However, the use of GCPs increased the accuracy of UAS-based reef morphology measurements, particularly in areas with the presence of water and/or homogeneous spectral characteristics. Our results indicate that both fixed-wing and multirotor UAS can be used to accurately monitor intertidal oyster reefs over time and that proper ground control techniques will improve measurements of reef morphology. These non-destructive methods help modernize oyster habitat monitoring by providing useful and accurate knowledge about the structure and health of oyster reefs ecosystems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue She Maps)
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