Special Issue "Remote Sensing in Applications of Geoinformation"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Silas Michaelides
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Cyprus Institute, 20 Konstantinou Kavafi Street2121 Aglantzia, Nicosia, Cyprus
Interests: meteorology; atmospheric remote sensing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Remote Sensing, especially from satellites, is a source of invaluable data which can be used to generate synoptic information for virtually all parts of the Earth, including the atmosphere, land, and ocean. In the last few decades, such data have evolved as a basis for accurate information about the Earth, leading to a wealth of geoscientific analysis focusing on diverse applications. Geoinformation systems based on remote sensing are increasingly becoming an integral part of the current information and communication society. The integration of remote sensing and geoinformation essentially involves combining data provided from both, in a consistent and sensible manner. This process has been accelerated by technologically advanced tools and methods for remote sensing data access and integration, paving the way for scientific advances in a broadening range of remote sensing exploitations in applications of geoinformation.
This Special Issue will host original research papers focusing on the exploitation of remote sensing from satellites, but also from various other platforms, in applications of geoinformation. The papers’ emphasis can be from a wide range of such applications. Indicatively, papers can focus on, but are not limited to, atmosphere, ocean, coastal waters, agriculture, forestry, land cover, land use, natural hazards, urban and rural environments, urban planning, public health, meteorology, climate change, oceanography and coupled ocean and atmosphere modelling, cultural heritage and archaeological reconstruction, military, environmental modeling and analysis, biodiversity conservation, transport including maritime and aviation, transportation and infrastructure, mineral exploration, erosion, hydrology, etc.

Dr. Silas Michaelides
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle
Automatic Inundation Mapping Using Sentinel-2 Data Applicable to Both Camargue and Doñana Biosphere Reserves
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(19), 2251; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11192251 - 27 Sep 2019
Abstract
Flooding periodicity is crucial for biomass production and ecosystem functions in wetland areas. Local monitoring networks may be enriched by spaceborne derived products with a temporal resolution of a few days. Unsupervised computer vision techniques are preferred, since human interference and the use [...] Read more.
Flooding periodicity is crucial for biomass production and ecosystem functions in wetland areas. Local monitoring networks may be enriched by spaceborne derived products with a temporal resolution of a few days. Unsupervised computer vision techniques are preferred, since human interference and the use of training data may be kept to a minimum. Recently, a novel automatic local thresholding unsupervised methodology for separating inundated areas from non-inundated ones led to successful results for the Doñana Biosphere Reserve. This study examines the applicability of this approach to Camarque Biosphere Reserve, and proposes alternatives to the original approach to enhance accuracy and applicability for both Camargue and Doñana wetlands in a scientific quest for methods that may serve accurately biomes at both protected areas. In particular, it examines alternative inputs for automatically estimating thresholds while applying various algorithms for estimating the splitting thresholds. Reference maps for Camargue are provided by local authorities, and generated using Sentinel-2 Band 8A (NIR) and Band 12 (SWIR-2). The alternative approaches examined led to high inundation mapping accuracy. In particular, for the Camargue study area and 39 different dates, the alternative approach with the highest overall Kappa coefficient is 0.84, while, for the Doñana Biosphere Reserve and Doñana marshland (a subset of Doñana Reserve) and 7 different dates, is 0.85 and 0.94, respectively. Moreover, there are alternative approaches with high overall Kappa for all areas, i.e., at 0.79 for Camargue, over 0.91 for Doñana marshland, and over 0.82 for Doñana Reserve. Additionally, this study identifies the alternative approaches that perform better when the study area is extensively covered by temporary flooded and emergent vegetation areas (i.e., Camargue Reserve and Doñana marshland) or when it contains a large percentage of dry areas (i.e., Doñana Reserve). The development of credible automatic thresholding techniques that can be applied to different wetlands could lead to a higher degree of automation for map production, while enhancing service utilization by non-trained personnel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing in Applications of Geoinformation)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessTechnical Note
The Application of LiDAR Data for the Solar Potential Analysis Based on Urban 3D Model
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(20), 2348; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11202348 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
Solar maps are becoming a popular resource and are available via the web to help plan investments for the benefits of renewable energy. These maps are especially useful when the results have high accuracy. LiDAR technology currently offers high-resolution data sources that are [...] Read more.
Solar maps are becoming a popular resource and are available via the web to help plan investments for the benefits of renewable energy. These maps are especially useful when the results have high accuracy. LiDAR technology currently offers high-resolution data sources that are very suitable for obtaining an urban 3D geometry with high precision. Three-dimensional visualization also offers a more accurate and intuitive perspective of reality than 2D maps. This paper presents a new method for the calculation and visualization of the solar potential of building roofs on an urban 3D model, based on LiDAR data. The paper describes the proposed methodology to (1) calculate the solar potential, (2) generate an urban 3D model, (3) semantize the urban 3D model with different existing and calculated data, and (4) visualize the urban 3D model in a 3D web environment. The urban 3D model is based on the CityGML standard, which offers the ability to consistently combine geometry and semantics and enable the integration of different levels (building and city) in a continuous model. The paper presents the workflow and results of application to the city of Vitoria-Gasteiz in Spain. This paper also shows the potential use of LiDAR data in different domains that can be connected using different technologies and different scales. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing in Applications of Geoinformation)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop