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Special Issue "Remote Sensing of Flow Velocity, Channel Bathymetry, and River Discharge"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensing in Geology, Geomorphology and Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Carl J. Legleiter

Geomorphology and Sediment Transport Laboratory, U.S. Geological Survey, 4620 Technology Drive, Suite #400, Golden, CO 80403, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 303-271-3651
Interests: Remote sensing of rivers, fluvial geomorphology, hyperspectral, bathymetric LiDAR, depth retrieval, in-stream habitat, morphodynamics, channel change, geostatistics
Guest Editor
Dr. Tamlin Pavelsky

Department of Geological Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 919-962-4239
Interests: global hydrology, inundation extent, lakes, rivers, wetlands, new satellite missions
Guest Editor
Dr. Michael Durand

School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 South Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 614-247-4835
Interests: Remote sensing, Hydrology, Rivers, Snow, Water Cycle
Guest Editor
Dr. George Allen

College of Geosciences, Texas A&M University, 400 Bizzell St, College Station, TX 77843, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 979-845-7187
Interests: Remote sensing of rivers, fluvial geomorphology, surface hydrology, water resources, carbon cycling
Guest Editor
Dr. Angelica Tarpanelli

Research Institute for Geo-Hydrological Protection, National Research Council, Via della Madonna Alta 126, 06128 Perugia, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +39 0755014-426
Interests: Remote sensing of rivers, hydrological and hydraulic processes, flooded area estimation, analysis of climate change effects on flood frequency
Guest Editor
Dr. Renato Frasson

Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center, The Ohio State University, 1090 Carmack Road, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +16146884451
Interests: Remote Sensing of Rivers, Discharge Estimation, Inverse Problems, Hydrology, Computer Modeling, Remote Sensing of Floods
Guest Editor
Dr. Inci Guneralp

The College of Geosciences, Texas A&M University, 810 Eller O&M Building, College Station, TX 77845, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 979-845-7155
Interests: Remote sensing of rivers, fluvial geomorphology, flooding, river channel dynamics, river biogeomorphodynamics, floodplain landscape evolution, spatiotemporal modeling
Guest Editor
Dr. Amy Woodget

Department of Geography, Loughborough University, Epinal Way, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, UK
E-Mail
Interests: Remote Sensing of Rivers, UAVs, Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry, Grain Size Estimation, Fluvial Topography/Bathymetry, Refraction Correction, Fluvial Geomorphology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

River discharge is a fundamental hydrological quantity that summarizes how a watershed transforms the input of precipitation into output as streamflow. The accurate measurement of discharge is critical for numerous applications including water supply, navigation, recreation, management of in-stream habitat, and prediction and monitoring of floods and droughts. However, traditional, in situ stream gage networks providing such data are sparse and declining, even in developed nations, and absent in many parts of the world. Moreover, establishing and maintaining these gages is expensive, labor-intensive, and can place personnel at risk. 

For all these reasons, remote sensing represents an appealing alternative means of obtaining streamflow information. Potential advantages of the remote sensing approach include greater efficiency, expanded coverage, increased measurement frequency, cost savings, reduced risk to field hydrographers, and the opportunity to examine not just isolated cross-sections but longer reaches of river channels in two or three dimensions. Realizing these objectives will require research focused on the remote measurement of river discharge and its components: flow velocity and channel geometry. 

The purpose of this Special Issue is to stimulate progress toward an operational capacity for streamflow monitoring and advance novel methods for retrieving discharge and its components by encouraging studies on this topic and compiling high-quality, peer-reviewed articles in an issue of Remote Sensing dedicated to this theme. We encourage the submission of manuscripts concerned with all aspects of the remote measurement of streamflow, including estimation of flow velocity, channel bathymetry (or water depth), and discharge from various types of remotely-sensed data (active or passive) acquired from a range of platforms (manned or unmanned aircraft, satellites, or ground-based imaging systems). Papers describing past, present, or future missions devoted to fluvial remote sensing are welcome, with a submission deadline of 31 October 2019.

Dr. Carl J. Legleiter
Dr. Tamlin Pavelsky
Dr. Michael Durand
Dr. George Allen
Dr. Angelica Tarpanelli
Dr. Renato Frasson
Dr. Inci Guneralp
Dr. Amy Woodget
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Remote sensing of rivers
  • discharge
  • flow velocity
  • channel bathymetry
  • hydrology
  • streamflow
  • fluvial geomorphology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Empirical Assessment Tool for Bathymetry, Flow Velocity and Salinity in Estuaries Based on Tidal Amplitude and Remotely-Sensed Imagery
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(12), 1915; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10121915
Received: 8 November 2018 / Revised: 22 November 2018 / Accepted: 23 November 2018 / Published: 30 November 2018
PDF Full-text (15085 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Hydromorphological data for many estuaries worldwide is scarce and usually limited to offshore tidal amplitude and remotely-sensed imagery. In many projects, information about morphology and intertidal area is needed to assess the effects of human interventions and rising sea-level on the natural depth [...] Read more.
Hydromorphological data for many estuaries worldwide is scarce and usually limited to offshore tidal amplitude and remotely-sensed imagery. In many projects, information about morphology and intertidal area is needed to assess the effects of human interventions and rising sea-level on the natural depth distribution and on changing habitats. Habitat area depends on the spatial pattern of intertidal area, inundation time, peak flow velocities and salinity. While numerical models can reproduce these spatial patterns fairly well, their data need and computational costs are high and for each case a new model must be developed. Here, we present a Python tool that includes a comprehensive set of relations that predicts the hydrodynamics, bed elevation and the patterns of channels and bars in mere seconds. Predictions are based on a combination of empirical relations derived from natural estuaries, including a novel predictor for cross-sectional depth distributions, which is dependent on the along-channel width profile. Flow velocity, an important habitat characteristic, is calculated with a new correlation between depth below high water level and peak tidal flow velocity, which was based on spatial numerical modelling. Salinity is calculated from estuarine geometry and flow conditions. The tool only requires an along-channel width profile and tidal amplitude, making it useful for quick assessments, for example of potential habitat in ecology, when only remotely-sensed imagery is available. Full article
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Graphical abstract

Remote Sens. EISSN 2072-4292 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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