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Special Issue "Imaging Floods and Glacier Geohazards with Remote Sensing"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensing in Geology, Geomorphology and Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Francesca Cigna

Italian Space Agency (ASI), Via del Politecnico snc, 00133 Rome, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: remote sensing; Earth observation; InSAR; landslides; land subsidence; ground instability; landscape evolution; geophysical hazards; archaeology; cultural heritage
Guest Editor
Prof. Hongjie Xie

Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Remote sensing of water cycle; cryosphere; and polar regions
Guest Editor
Dr. Karem Chokmani

Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Centre - Eau Terre Environnement Address: 490, rue de la Couronne, Québec City, QC G1K 9A9, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Development of methods for estimating and monitoring environmental conditions, at both local and regional scales, by combining statistical methods, remote sensing data and geomatics tools

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geohazards associated with the dynamics of the liquid and solid water of the Earth’s hydrosphere, such as floods and glacial processes, may pose significant risks to populations, activities and property. Adverse weather, tsunamis, storm surges, sea level rise or even changes in land use (e.g. infrastructure projects or resource exploitation) may cause coastal, fluvial and surface-water inundations. Heavy snowmelt, ice jams and dam failure can lead to catastrophic flooding. Rock, snow and ice avalanches impacting glacial lakes can trigger outburst floods. Sea ice and icebergs may disrupt ship circulation along sea lanes worldwide.

Understanding how these geohazards occur, their severity, causes and types, and the damage they cause, helps to design and improve forecasting methods and risk mitigation approaches. By providing a spectrum of imaging capabilities, resolutions, temporal and spatial coverage, remote sensing plays a pivotal role in achieving these objectives.

This Special Issue of Remote Sensing aims to gather research articles and reviews on the use of satellite, aerial and ground-based remote sensing to image floods and glacier geohazards.

We welcome papers on novel technologies (e.g. new sensors, platforms), data (e.g. multi-spectral, radar, LiDAR) and analysis methods (e.g. change detection, offset tracking, SfM, 3D modelling, InSAR), as well as case studies and discussions of current trends and future perspectives.

Dr. Francesca Cigna
Dr. Hongjie Xie
Dr. Karem Chokmani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • floods
  • tsunami
  • storm surge
  • sea level rise
  • ice avalanche
  • glacier lake outburst flood
  • ice jam
  • glacier retreat
  • icebergs
  • satellite, aerial and ground-based remote sensing
  • disaster mapping

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A Novel Fully Automated Mapping of the Flood Extent on SAR Images Using a Supervised Classifier
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(7), 779; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11070779
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 21 March 2019 / Accepted: 27 March 2019 / Published: 1 April 2019
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Abstract
When a populated area is inundated, the availability of a flood extent map becomes vital to assist the local authorities to plan rescue operations and evacuate the premises promptly. This paper proposes a novel automatic way to rapidly map the flood extent using [...] Read more.
When a populated area is inundated, the availability of a flood extent map becomes vital to assist the local authorities to plan rescue operations and evacuate the premises promptly. This paper proposes a novel automatic way to rapidly map the flood extent using a supervised classifier. The methodology described in this paper is fully automated since the training of the supervised classifier is made starting from water and land masks derived from the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), and without any intervention from the human operator. Both a pre-event Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image and an optical Sentinel-2 image are needed to train the supervised classifier to identify the inundation on the flooded SAR image. The entire flood mapping process, which consists of preprocessing the images, the extraction of the training dataset, and finally the classification, was assessed on flood events which occurred in Tewkesbury (England) in 2007 and in Myanmar in 2015, and were captured by TerraSAR-X and Sentinel-1, respectively. This algorithm was found to offer overall a good compromise between computation time and precision of the classification, making it suitable for emergency situations. In fact, the inundation maps produced for the previous two flood events were in agreement with the ground truths for over 90% of the pixels in the SAR images. Besides, the latter process took less than 5 min to finish the flood mapping from a SAR image of more than 41 million pixels for the dataset capturing the flood in Tewkesbury, and around 2 min and 40 s for an image of 19 million pixels of the flood in Myanmar. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging Floods and Glacier Geohazards with Remote Sensing)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Repeat Glacier Collapses and Surges in the Amney Machen Mountain Range, Tibet, Possibly Triggered by a Developing Rock-Slope Instability
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(6), 708; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11060708
Received: 19 February 2019 / Revised: 12 March 2019 / Accepted: 19 March 2019 / Published: 24 March 2019
PDF Full-text (10725 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Collapsing valley glaciers leaving their bed to rush down a flat hill slope at the speed of a racing car are so far rare events. They have only been reported for the Kolkaglacier (Caucasus) in 2002 and the two glaciers in the Aru [...] Read more.
Collapsing valley glaciers leaving their bed to rush down a flat hill slope at the speed of a racing car are so far rare events. They have only been reported for the Kolkaglacier (Caucasus) in 2002 and the two glaciers in the Aru mountain range (Tibet) that failed in 2016. Both events have been studied in detail using satellite data and modeling to learn more about the reasons for and processes related to such events. This study reports about a series of so far undocumented glacier collapses that occurred in the Amney Machen mountain range (eastern Tibet) in 2004, 2007, and 2016. All three collapses were associated with a glacier surge, but from 1987 to 1995, the glacier surged without collapsing. The later surges and collapses were likely triggered by a progressing slope instability that released large amounts of ice and rock to the lower glacier tongue, distorting its dynamic stability. The surges and collapses might continue in the future as more ice and rock is available to fall on the glacier. It has been speculated that the development is a direct response to regional temperature increase that destabilized the surrounding hanging glaciers. However, the specific properties of the steep rock slopes and the glacier bed might also have played a role. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging Floods and Glacier Geohazards with Remote Sensing)
Figures

Graphical abstract

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