Special Issue "Big Earth Data and Remote Sensing in Coastal Environments"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Cuizhen (Susan) Wang
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
Interests: bio-environmental remote sensing; environmental modeling; coastal wetlands; sUAS
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Li Zhang

Guest Editor
Aerospace Information Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10094, China
Interests: remote sensing; coast; drylands carbon
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Prof. Dr. Deepak R. Mishra
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, University of Georgia, 210 Field Street, Rm 212B, Athens, GA 30602, USA
Interests: water quality (inland waters, estuaries, coastal, and open ocean waters); wetlands health, productivity, and carbon sequestration; benthic habitat mapping, cyber-innovated environmental sensing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coastal environments are steadily subjected to natural and anthropogenic stresses such as hurricanes, floods, sea level rise, and coastal development. Big Earth Data is a new frontier in earth and information sciences to study our living planet from excessive earth observations. Sponsored by the International Society of Digital Earth, the 12th International Symposium on Digital Earth (ISDE’12) will be held in Salzburg, Austria, July 2021 (https://digitalearth2021.org/) and will promote monitoring, measuring, and forecasting natural and human activities toward the vision of a “Digital Earth”. For coastal environments, it enhances our understanding of the natural and anthropogenic changes, adaptation, and management of this unique zone between land and sea.

This Special Issue solicits papers highlighting new insights and recent advancements in the applications of remote sensing and Big Earth Data in coastal zones. In alignment with the ISDE’12 goal, we invite submissions addressing various environmental problems by means of innovative data collection, processing, and analytical solutions. Both ISDE’12 papers and regular journal submissions are welcome.

Topics of interest may include but are not limited to the following:

  • Remote sensing of coastal wetlands and dynamics
  • Coastal adaptation to sea level rise
  • Response of coastal ecosystems to hurricanes and floods
  • New advances of systems and geospatial technologies in coastal monitoring: Cube satellites, sUAS (drone technology), sensor networks, citizen science, and cloud computing, etc.

Authors are required to check and follow the specific Instructions to Authors, https://www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing/instructions.

Prof. Cuizhen (Susan) Wang
Dr. Li Zhang
Prof. Dr. Deepak R. Mishra
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Remote sensing
  • Big earth data
  • Coast
  • Natural and developed lands
  • Sea level rise
  • Environmental stress

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Mapping Large-Scale Mangroves along the Maritime Silk Road from 1990 to 2015 Using a Novel Deep Learning Model and Landsat Data
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(2), 245; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020245 - 13 Jan 2021
Abstract
Mangroves are important ecosystems and their distribution and dynamics can provide an understanding of the processes of ecological change. Meanwhile, mangroves protection is also an important element of the Maritime Silk Road (MSR) Cooperation Project. Large amounts of accessible satellite remote sensing data [...] Read more.
Mangroves are important ecosystems and their distribution and dynamics can provide an understanding of the processes of ecological change. Meanwhile, mangroves protection is also an important element of the Maritime Silk Road (MSR) Cooperation Project. Large amounts of accessible satellite remote sensing data can provide timely and accurate information on the dynamics of mangroves, offering significant advantages in space, time, and characterization. In view of the capability of deep learning in processing massive data in recent years, we developed a new deep learning model—Capsules-Unet, which introduces the capsule concept into U-net to extract mangroves with high accuracy by learning the spatial relationship between objects in images. This model can significantly reduce the number of network parameters to improve the efficiency of data processing. This study uses Landsat data combined with Capsules-Unet to map the dynamics of mangrove changes over the 25 years (1990–2015) along the MSR. The results show that there was a loss in the mangrove area of 1,356,686 ha (about 21.5%) between 1990 and 2015, with anthropic activities such as agriculture, aquaculture, tourism, urban development, and over-development appearing to be the likely drivers of this decline. This information contributes to the understanding of ecological conditions, variability characteristics, and influencing factors along the MSR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Big Earth Data and Remote Sensing in Coastal Environments)
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