Special Issue "Volcanic Processes Monitoring and Hazard Assessment Using Integration of Remote Sensing and Ground-Based Techniques"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sonia Calvari
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo, 95125 Catania, Italy
Interests: monitoring active basaltic volcanoes; thermal imaging; effusive and explosive volcanic activity; eruption dynamics; volcanic hazard
Dr. Alessandro Bonaccorso
Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo, 95125 Catania, Italy
Interests: physical volcanology; volcano deformation; volcano sources modelling
Dr. Annalisa Cappello
Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo, 95125 Catania, Italy
Interests: volcanic hazard; physics-based models for geophysical flows; spatial-temporal analysis of volcanic systems to constrain eruption probabilities; mathematical models for eruption susceptibility; volcanic hazard and risk assessment
Dr. Flora Giudicepietro
Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Vesuviano, Napoli, Italy
Interests: Earthquake Seismology; Seismology; Earthquake; Geophysics; Seismics
Dr. Eugenio Sansosti
Website
Guest Editor
Istituto per il Rilevamento Elettromagnetico dell’Ambiente (IREA), National Research Council (CNR) of Italy, via Diocleziano, 328, 80124 Naples, Italy
Interests: Remote Sensing; Synthetic Aperture Radar; InSAR; Subsidence; Radar Signal Processing
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Volcanoes are complex systems that deserve a multidisciplinary monitoring effort in order to carry out appropriate and timely hazard assessments. In recent years, a number of monitoring techniques based on remotely sensed data have been implemented that enable obtaining synoptic views over the monitored areas. On the other hand, ground-based methods provide punctual, yet more accurate, measurements that complement remotely sensed parameters. It is clear, therefore, that the synergic use of remote sensing techniques and data with ground-based measurements can potentially provide an extra contribution to the hazard assessment, for instance in terms of accuracy of results, amount of information obtained, temporal availability, and so on.

We are seeking contributions that integrate the use of remote sensing and ground-based data, with particular focus on and reference to volcanic processes monitoring and related hazard assessment. In particular, contributions that contain the intersection of and integration between the various terrestrial geophysical monitoring techniques (i.e., seismic, ground deformation), remote sensing both from the ground (i.e., thermal analysis, gas geochemistry) and from satellite (i.e., InSAR, thermal analysis, etc.) are welcome and strongly encouraged. The investigative approach characterized by the integration of disciplines at different scales of vision and precision represent a modern challenge to strive for a more complete understanding of volcanic processes and therefore a better hazard evaluation.

Dr. Sonia Calvari
Dr. Alessandro Bonaccorso
Dr. Annalisa Cappello
Dr. Flora Giudicepietro
Dr. Eugenio Sansosti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Volcano monitoring
  • Data integration
  • Ground based measurements
  • Satellite observations
  • Thermal monitoring
  • Volcanic hazard assessment
  • InSAR
  • Volcanic crises management
  • Explosive and effusive eruptions

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Overflows and Pyroclastic Density Currents in March-April 2020 at Stromboli Volcano Detected by Remote Sensing and Seismic Monitoring Data
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(18), 3010; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12183010 - 16 Sep 2020
Abstract
Between 28 March and 1 April 2020, Stromboli volcano erupted, with overflows from the NE crater rim spreading along the barren Sciara del Fuoco slope and reaching the sea along the NW coast of the island. Poor weather conditions did not allow a [...] Read more.
Between 28 March and 1 April 2020, Stromboli volcano erupted, with overflows from the NE crater rim spreading along the barren Sciara del Fuoco slope and reaching the sea along the NW coast of the island. Poor weather conditions did not allow a detailed observation of the crater zone through the cameras monitoring network, but a clear view of the lower slope and the flows expanding in the area allowed us to characterize the flow features. This evidence was integrated with satellite, GBInSAR, and seismic data, thus enabling a reconstruction of the whole volcanic event, which involved several small collapses of the summit cone and the generation of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) spreading along the slope and on the sea surface. Satellite monitoring allowed for the mapping of the lava flow field and the quantification of the erupted volume, and GBInSAR continuous measurements detected the crater widening and the deflation of the summit cone caused by the last overflow. The characterization of the seismicity made it possible to identify the signals that are associated with the propagation of PDCs along the volcano flank and, for the first time, to recognize the signal that is produced by the impact of the PDCs on the coast. Full article
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