Special Issue "Extraterrestrial Influences on Remote Sensing in the Earth’s Atmosphere"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Atmosphere Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Aleksandra Nina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Milan Radovanović
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Geographical Institute “Jovan Cvijic” of Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Belgrade, Serbia
Institute of Sports, Tourism and Service, South Ural State University, 454080 Chelyabinsk, Russia
Interests: space weather; physical geography; natural hazards; tourism
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Luka Č. Popović
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Astronomical Observatory, Belgrade, Serbia
2. Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: astrophysics; spectroscopy; active galactic nuclei, gravitational lensing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Propagation properties of the electromagnetic signals used for different kinds of remote sensing depends on the atmospheric parameters, such as the electron density and temperature. Spatial and temporal variations of these parameters affect signal propagations and, consequently, corresponding applications of the used technique such as observations and positioning. One of the most important sources of the atmospheric disturbances is solar electromagnetic and charged particles radiation. In addition, cosmic rays, including both electromagnetic and particle radiation, can provide enough intensive perturbations of the outer Earth’s layer that can affect the signal propagation path. The sources of these perturbations can be relatively close to our planet, but also can be located in the deep Universe. Perturber intensities, lengths and locations in the Earth’s atmosphere can be quite different, which can induce various signal deviations.

The aim of this Issue is to present the latest research linking events and processes in the outer space with changes in the propagation of the satellite and ground-based signals used in remote sensing. This Special issue welcomes papers that explore the following:

- Detection of the extra-terrestrial radiation and modelling of the induced atmospheric disturbances using different kinds of remote sensing techniques;

- Changes in signals used for remote sensing and the quality of their applications during influences of extra-terrestrial events;

- Influences of events from outer space on the detection of terrestrial or extra-terrestrial events and corresponding modelling, such as masking less intense perturbations with solar influences, etc.

Additionally, other papers that deal with the Earth’s atmosphere’s perturbations due to extra-terrestrial events (e.g., meteor perturbatios) that may affect signal propagation are welcome.

Dr. Aleksandra Nina
Prof. Dr. Milan Radovanović
Prof. Dr. Luka Č. Popović
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Atmosphere
  • Observations
  • Signal processing
  • Modelling
  • Extraterrestrial radiation
  • Solar radiation
  • Disturbances
  • Remote sensing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Extraterrestrial Influences on Remote Sensing in the Earth’s Atmosphere
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(5), 890; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13050890 - 26 Feb 2021
Viewed by 706
Abstract
Atmospheric properties have a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) waves, including the propagation of EM signals used for remote sensing. For this reason, changes in the received amplitudes and phases of these signals can be used for the detection of the atmospheric disturbances [...] Read more.
Atmospheric properties have a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) waves, including the propagation of EM signals used for remote sensing. For this reason, changes in the received amplitudes and phases of these signals can be used for the detection of the atmospheric disturbances and, consequently, for their investigation. Some of the most important sources of the temporal and space variations in the atmospheric parameters come from the outer space. Although the solar radiation dominates in these processes, radiation coming out of the solar system also can induces enough intensive disturbance in the atmosphere to provide deflections in the EM signal propagation paths. The aim of this issue is to present the latest research linking events and processes in outer space with changes in the propagation of the satellite and ground-based signals used in remote sensing. Full article
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Research

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Article
Ionization in the Earth’s Atmosphere Due to Isotropic Energetic Electron Precipitation: Ion Production and Primary Electron Spectra
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(20), 4161; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13204161 - 18 Oct 2021
Viewed by 387
Abstract
Energetic electron precipitation (EEP) via atmospheric ion production rates is a natural force acting on the atmosphere and climate systems. The correct estimation of EEP ion production and spectra for the computation of ionization rates is an important issue for estimating climate forces. [...] Read more.
Energetic electron precipitation (EEP) via atmospheric ion production rates is a natural force acting on the atmosphere and climate systems. The correct estimation of EEP ion production and spectra for the computation of ionization rates is an important issue for estimating climate forces. In the present paper, we propose a favorable method for the computation of ionization rates forced by EEP using the new parameterization of ion production and a new spectrum shape, which allow one to take into account the range of precipitating particles from tens of keV to several MeV. A new function of spectral fit will also be helpful in obtaining information about EEP from satellite and balloon observations. Presented here, the parameterization of atmospheric ionization in the Earth’s atmosphere includes a new yield function of isotropically precipitating monoenergetic electrons and ionization via Bremsstrahlung radiation. Look-up tables with ion production/yield function for isotropically precipitating monoenergetic electrons (30 keV–5 MeV) can be easily used for the computation of ionization rates and can further be used by atmospheric and chemistry-climate models for accurate quantification of atmospheric parameters during energetic electron precipitation. Full article
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