Special Issue "Natural Disasters and Extreme Solar Energy"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Vladimir Sreckovic
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Astrophysics and Ionospheric Laboratory, Institute of Physics Belgrade, University of Belgrade, 11080 Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: solar and stellar astrophysics; space weather studies of upper atmosphere; astrogeoinformatics; astroinformatics; databases; data-mining; natural hazards
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Milan Radovanović
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Geographical Institute “Jovan Cvijic” of Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Belgrade, Serbia
Institute of Sports, Tourism and Service, South Ural State University, 454080 Chelyabinsk, Russia
Interests: Space weather; Physical geography; Natural hazards; Tourism
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The atmosphere is a very sensitive medium to extraterrestrial forces, most importantly, solar electromagnetic radiation and energetic particle intrusion. This released intense solar activity can cause sudden disturbances in the Earth’s atmosphere and further create ground telecommunication interferences, blackouts, transportation problems, water supply problems, potential health effects, as well as natural disasters, such as forest fires. These extreme events can cause billions of dollars of damage and impact individuals, families, communities, and societies. For this reason, it is of crucial importance to investigate the connections between this extreme activity, natural disasters, and further develop ways to prevent, prepare against, and respond to them. The aim of this Special Issue is to engage a wide community of scientists to defragment and expend current knowledge in this field.

We would like to invite you to submit review-papers, case studies, or research articles that formulate innovative approaches related to this field so that these results can be used by other scientists as well as engineers and other people employed in the industry. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

- Natural hazards;

- solar activity;

- Fires;

- Atmosphere modeling and forecasting;

- Remote sensing;

- Public health;

- Transportation safety;

- Telecommunication disturbances;

and other topics that connect risk, disasters, and sustainability.

Dr. Vladimir A. Sreckovic
Dr. Aleksandra Nina
Prof. Dr. Milan Radovanovic
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • natural hazards
  • solar activity
  • fires
  • solar flares
  • atmosphere
  • modeling and forecasting
  • remote sensing
  • public health
  • transportation safety
  • telecommunication disturbances

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEditorial
Multidisciplinarity in Research of Extreme Solar Energy Influences on Natural Disasters
Sustainability 2019, 11(4), 974; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11040974 - 14 Feb 2019
Viewed by 1143
Abstract
The atmosphere is a very sensitive medium to extraterrestrial forces, most importantly, solar electromagnetic radiation and energetic particle intrusion. This released intense solar activity can cause sudden disturbances in the Earth’s atmosphere and further create ground telecommunication interferences, blackouts, transportation problems, water supply [...] Read more.
The atmosphere is a very sensitive medium to extraterrestrial forces, most importantly, solar electromagnetic radiation and energetic particle intrusion. This released intense solar activity can cause sudden disturbances in the Earth’s atmosphere and further create ground telecommunication interferences, blackouts, transportation problems, water supply problems, potential health effects, as well as natural disasters, such as forest fires. These extreme events can cause billions of dollars of damage and impact individuals, families, communities, and societies. For this reason, it is of crucial importance to investigate the connections between this extreme activity and natural disasters, and further develop ways to prevent, prepare against, and respond to them. The aim of this special issue is to engage a wide community of scientists to de-fragment broaden and improve our knowledge in this field. We invite researchers from all relevant fields to publish their recent investigations in this special issue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Disasters and Extreme Solar Energy)
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Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle
Connection of Solar Activities and Forest Fires in 2018: Events in the USA (California), Portugal and Greece
Sustainability 2020, 12(24), 10261; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410261 - 09 Dec 2020
Viewed by 492
Abstract
The impact of solar activity on environmental processes is difficult to understand and complex for empirical modeling. This study aimed to establish forecast models of the meteorological conditions in the forest fire areas based on the solar activity parameters applying the neural networks [...] Read more.
The impact of solar activity on environmental processes is difficult to understand and complex for empirical modeling. This study aimed to establish forecast models of the meteorological conditions in the forest fire areas based on the solar activity parameters applying the neural networks approach. During July and August 2018, severe forest fires simultaneously occurred in the State of California (USA), Portugal, and Greece. Air temperature and humidity data together with solar parameters (integral flux of solar protons, differential electron flux and proton flux, solar wind plasma parameters, and solar radio flux at 10.7 cm data) were used in long short-term memory (LSTM) recurrent neural network ensembles. It is found that solar activity mostly affects the humidity for two stations in California and Portugal (an increase in the integral flux of solar protons of > 30 MeV by 10% increases the humidity by 3.25%, 1.65%, and 1.57%, respectively). Furthermore, an increase in air temperature of 10% increases the humidity by 2.55%, 2.01%, and 0.26%, respectively. It is shown that temperature is less sensitive to changes in solar parameters but depends on previous conditions (previous increase of 10% increases the current temperature by 0.75%, 0.34%, and 0.33%, respectively). Humidity in Greece is mostly impacted by solar flux F10.7 cm and previous values of humidity. An increase in these factors by 10% will lead to a decrease in the humidity of 3.89% or an increase of 1.31%, while air temperature mostly depends on ion temperature. If this factor increases by 10%, it will lead to air temperature rising by 0.42%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Disasters and Extreme Solar Energy)
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Open AccessArticle
Typhoon Disaster Risk Assessment Based on Emergy Theory: A Case Study of Zhuhai City, Guangdong Province, China
Sustainability 2020, 12(10), 4212; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12104212 - 21 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 776
Abstract
Typhoons and cyclones are the most impacting and destructive natural disasters in the world. To address the shortcomings of a previous typhoon disaster risk assessment (for example, human factors were involved in determining weights by importance, and this affected the experimental results), an [...] Read more.
Typhoons and cyclones are the most impacting and destructive natural disasters in the world. To address the shortcomings of a previous typhoon disaster risk assessment (for example, human factors were involved in determining weights by importance, and this affected the experimental results), an emergy method, which converts energy flows of different properties into the same solar energy basis for a convenient comparison, was used to assess the risk of regional typhoon disasters. Typhoon disaster-related data from 2017 were used to develop an index system including resilience, potential strength, and sensitivity which was in turn applied to assess typhoon disaster risks in Zhuhai City, Guangdong Province, China. The results showed that the spatial distribution of the typhoon disaster risks in Zhuhai significantly differed, with the highest risk in Xiangzhou district, the second highest risk in Doumen district, and the lowest risk in Jinwan district. In addition, improving the level of regional resilience can effectively reduce risks from typhoon disasters. The application of the emergy method in a typhoon disaster risk assessment may provide some theoretical support for national and regional governmental strategies for disaster prevention and reduction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Disasters and Extreme Solar Energy)
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