Special Issue "Remote Sensing of Air-Sea Fluxes"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Biogeosciences Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Peter Minnett
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ocean Sciences, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, USA
Interests: satellite remote sensing of sea-surface temperature; ship-board hyperspectral radiometry; air–sea fluxes; ocean thermal skin layer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ocean–atmosphere interface marks the boundary between the two major fluid components of the climate system. Exchange of heat, moisture, momentum, gases and solid particles between the ocean and atmosphere are of fundamental importance to better understanding and improved forecasting of the weather and climate change. Satellite remote sensing provides global data with rapid sampling at useful accuracies for many studies, and remote sensing from planes, aerial drones, and other platforms is used to study important processes and critical regions. Currently, we are in a fortunate position as remote sensing of the ocean surface and lower atmosphere has provided us with time series of consistent, accurate fields of two to three decades, and new satellites recently launched or in development are opening new research opportunities. Algorithm developments are improving the accuracy of measurements relevant to remote sensing of surface exchanges.

This idea of this Special Issue grew from the session at the ESA Living Planet Symposium 2019 on Surface Ocean—Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS) research, but prospective authors are not limited to this session. The journal welcomes contributions related to all aspects of remote sensing of the ocean surface and lower atmosphere for this Special Issue.

Dr. Peter Minnett
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sea surface variables
  • Lower atmosphere variables
  • Surface radiative fluxes
  • Air–sea exchanges
  • Weather forecasting
  • Climate monitoring
  • Remote sensing theory
  • Satellite instruments

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
CYGNSS Surface Heat Flux Product Development
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(19), 2294; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11192294 - 01 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Ocean surface heat fluxes play a significant role in the genesis and evolution of various marine-based atmospheric phenomena, from the synoptic scale down to the microscale. While in-situ measurements from buoys and flux towers will continue to be the standard in regard to [...] Read more.
Ocean surface heat fluxes play a significant role in the genesis and evolution of various marine-based atmospheric phenomena, from the synoptic scale down to the microscale. While in-situ measurements from buoys and flux towers will continue to be the standard in regard to surface heat flux estimates, they commonly have significant gaps in temporal and spatial coverage. Previous and current satellite missions have filled these gaps; though they may not observe the fluxes directly, they can measure the variables needed (wind speed, temperature and humidity) to estimate latent and sensible heat fluxes. However, current remote sensing instruments have their own limitations, such as infrequent coverage, signals attenuated by precipitation or both. The Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) mission overcomes these limitations over the tropical and subtropical oceans by providing improved coverage in nearly all weather conditions. While CYGNSS (Level 2) primarily estimates surface winds, when coupled with observations or estimates of temperature and humidity from reanalysis data, it can provide estimates of latent and sensible heat fluxes along its orbit. This paper describes the development of the Surface Heat Flux Product for the CYGNSS mission, its current results and expected improvements and changes in future releases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Air-Sea Fluxes)
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