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Special Issue "Remote Sensing Based Monitoring of Terrestrial Ecosystem Service Bundles, Trade-Offs and Synergies II"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Ecological Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2023 | Viewed by 2018

Special Issue Editors

TERRA Teaching and Research Centre, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, University of Liège, 5030 Gembloux, Belgium
Interests: soil science; ecosystem services; soil organic carbon; climate change; environmental informatics; sustainable land systems; landscape ecology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Centre for Environment and Agricultural Informatics, Soil and Agrifood Institute, School of Water, Energy and Environment, Cranfield University, Bedford, UK
Interests: water science and engineering; natural capital; instrumentation and sensors; soil resources; digital agriculture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, China
Interests: urbanization ecological effects; ecosystem services trade-offs; landscape multifunctionality; ecological security patterns
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is a sequel of the previous Special Issue entitled “Remote Sensing Based Monitoring of Terrestrial Ecosystem Service Bundles, Trade-Offs and Synergies”. In recent years, remote sensing has become the most successful methodology to monitor earth surface processes and assess ecosystem service supply across a wide range of terrestrial environments. In this Special Issue, we welcome contributions from studies focusing on the use of remote sensing technology to investigate two or more terrestrial ecosystem services. These studies may consider any technology that enables stand-off collection of data (from X-ray CT scanning to satellite imagery) in order to get an improved representation of either a soil property, plant characteristic or land surface process, with the objective to assess the delivery of multiple ecosystem services. Hence, the present Special Issue will host papers considering a wide range of terrestrial ecosystem services (e.g., food security, soil conservation, climate regulation, flood protection, drinking water quantity and quality) as well as spatial (soil pore–global) and temporal scales (minutes–decades). However, particular interest will be given to research that aims to assess ecosystem service bundles, trade-offs, and synergies and obtain insights into the associated environmental feedbacks, including climate change, land use change and agromanagement. We encourage the authors to highlight the socioeconomic and/or environmental impact potentials of their scientific outcomes as well as translate these into recommendations for policy making.

Dr. Jeroen Meersmans
Dr. Toby Waine
Prof. Dr. Jian Peng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ecosystem service bundles
  • food security
  • climate regulation
  • water supply
  • flood control
  • soil conservation

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Exploring the Impact of Grain-for-Green Program on Trade-Offs and Synergies among Ecosystem Services in West Liao River Basin, China
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(10), 2490; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15102490 - 09 May 2023
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Abstract
Natural ecosystems of the West Liao River basin (WLRB) in northeast China have been damaged by both natural and human factors from the 1990s. Since 2000, China’s Grain-for-Green Program (GFGP) has been widely adopted with the aim of improving ecosystem services. An accurate [...] Read more.
Natural ecosystems of the West Liao River basin (WLRB) in northeast China have been damaged by both natural and human factors from the 1990s. Since 2000, China’s Grain-for-Green Program (GFGP) has been widely adopted with the aim of improving ecosystem services. An accurate evaluation of the eco-hydrological effects for policy implementation is essential to provide references for further restoration of ecosystem services. This study quantified and characterized the ecosystem services and their trade-offs/synergies using models and statistical methods in the WLRB from 1990 to 2020. Moreover, the impact of key drivers on ecosystem services was evaluated by the difference-in-differences model. Among them, the study mainly investigated how GFGP affects ecosystem services. The results confirmed that the water yield, carbon sequestration, habitat quality, and total ecosystem service of the WLRB decreased in the pre-GFGP period (1990–2000). However, this tendency was reversed in the regions where the GFGP was implemented during the period of 2001–2020. Furthermore, a synergistic relationship was shown among carbon sequestration, soil conservation, and habitat quality. Additionally, there were tradeoffs between water yield and the other three ecosystem services, especially in mountain areas. The GFGP could restore carbon sequestration, habitat quality, and total ecosystem services by 1.3%, 2.1%, and 0.6%, respectively. Nevertheless, GFCP may enlarge the tradeoff and imbalance between water yield and habitat quality. Results highlight the need for the governance of ecosystem protection and suggest natural restoration in the mountain area for maintaining water yield and helping ecosystem restoration. Timely adjustment of the policy implementation areas is the key to improving and balancing multiple ecosystem services in the future. Full article
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Article
Investigating the Impact of Urbanization on Water Ecosystem Services in the Dongjiang River Basin: A Spatial Analysis
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(9), 2265; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15092265 - 25 Apr 2023
Viewed by 531
Abstract
The expansion of urban areas has resulted in a substantial increase in demand for water ecosystem services. To address this issue, this study aims to investigate how the interaction between urbanization and water ecosystem services changed in response to different levels of urbanization [...] Read more.
The expansion of urban areas has resulted in a substantial increase in demand for water ecosystem services. To address this issue, this study aims to investigate how the interaction between urbanization and water ecosystem services changed in response to different levels of urbanization in the Dongjiang River Basin from 1985 to 2020. The research examines four water ecosystem services (water yield, soil retention, and water purifications of N and P) and three types of urbanizations (population urbanization, economic urbanization, and land urbanization) to identify spatial heterogeneities among developed urban areas, developing urban areas, and rural regions, as well as their dynamic interactions. The findings indicate that water ecosystem services and urbanizations tend to be spatially polarized, with high values downstream and low values upstream. Although they have become more closely aligned, there is a local mismatch under basin-level homogeneity. Urbanization has migrated and centralized in a southward direction, while water ecosystem services have moved westward. This difference of migration results in an increasing trade-off in the west band of Dongjiang River. In particular, the developing urban area has been strengthening the function of the transition zone between the developed urban area and rural area, resulting in a dramatic decrease in synergy. The synergy of the rural area dominates the increasing synergy of the entire basin, but the developed urban area tends to lower the water ecosystem services that lag behind urbanization. The study recommends that policymakers consider different urban levels when developing urbanization plans and water resource management strategies, and implement measures to maintain the synergy in the rural area and mitigate the trade-off in the developing area. Full article
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Article
Identifying the Driving Impact Factors on Water Yield Service in Mountainous Areas of the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region in China
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(3), 727; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15030727 - 26 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 477
Abstract
Clarifying the interrelationship between climate and land use/land cover (LULC) changes on water yield in mountainous areas is very urgent due to the dramatic decrease in the water availability of mountainous areas. In this study, the InVEST model was used to calculate the [...] Read more.
Clarifying the interrelationship between climate and land use/land cover (LULC) changes on water yield in mountainous areas is very urgent due to the dramatic decrease in the water availability of mountainous areas. In this study, the InVEST model was used to calculate the water yield of the mountainous area in Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region (BTH) from 1980 to 2020, and six scenarios were designed to identify the contribution rates of climate and LULC change on the water yield. The results showed that, in 1980–2020, the water yield in the mountainous area of BTH was the largest in 1990, at 377.95 mm and the smallest in 1980, at 150.49 mm. After 2000, the interannual water yield showed a slightly increasing trend, which was significantly lower than the water yield in 1990, the values ranging from 217.01 mm to 324.65 mm. During the study period, the spatial distribution of the water yield was similar over the years, with high values in the south-central Taihang Mountain (THM) and the northeastern Yanshan Mountain (YSM). The THM was the main water yield area of the mountainous area in BTH. The annual water yield of farmland was the highest, followed by forest land and grassland, while the proportion of volumetric water yield was the largest in forest land with an increasing trend from 1980 to 2020 and the grassland showed a decreasing trend, while that of farmland increased first from 1980 to 2000 and decreased from 2000 to 2020. Climate is the key factor controlling the water yield of the mountainous area in BTH from 1980–2000, 2000 to 2020, and 1980 to 2020. In the period of 2000–2020, the effect of LULC on the water yield is negative, while the effect is positive in 1980–2000 and 1980–2020. The contribution rate of climate to the water yield increases in the THM, Bashang region (BSR) and YSM from the period 1980–2000 to 2000–2020, while that of LULC in those three regions changes from a positive impact in 1980–2000 to a negative impact in 2000–2020, and the contribution rate is also greatly reduced. In the long term, land revegetation will gradually benefit the water yield in the mountainous areas of BTH, including the THM, BSR, and YSM. These results can provide an important scientific and technological reference for the ecological management and protection of water source sites, as well as the planning and utilization of water resources in mountainous areas of BTH. Full article
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