Technology and Online Mental Health Support

A special issue of Psych (ISSN 2624-8611). This special issue belongs to the section "Neuropsychology, Mental Health and Brain Disorders".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021) | Viewed by 2309

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Psychology, University of Bolton, Deane Rd, Bolton BL3 5AB, UK
Interests: technology and health; mental health; online counselling; mental health support

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The overall goal of this Special Issue of Psych is to explore current developments in the application of technology, including online applications, to support people’s mental health and emotional needs. In recent years, we have seen more and more support for people utilising technology-based applications and online support avenues. Given the current climate, we are increasingly relying on technology to support our lives with a shift to even more support being offered online in 2020. 

Specifically, this Special Issue aims to provide an outlet for the rapid, widely accessible publication of peer-reviewed studies utilizing technologies and online platforms to support people with mental health and emotional needs. This Special Issue aims to cover, without being limited to, the following areas of mental health support: 

  • Technology: How technology is currently being used to support people with mental health and emotional needs and how these technologies are evaluated and received.  
  • Online: How online platforms are increasingly being used to support people with mental health and emotional needs, and how efficacious these are, how they are monitored and what the issues that arise from their use are.
  • Counselling: How counselling online is utilised, evaluated and received.
  • COVID-19: How COVID-19 has impacted mental health support and how technology has helped people with mental health needs through the ongoing crisis.

Dr. Julie Prescott
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Psych is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • virtual reality
  • mobile applications
  • computer games
  • online counselling
  • social media
  • AI
  • online communities

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 257 KiB  
Article
Online Peer Counseling for Suicidal Ideation: Participant Characteristics and Reasons for Using or Refusing This Service
by Maren Weiss, Anja Hildebrand, Hellmuth Braun-Scharm and Mark Stemmler
Psych 2021, 3(2), 61-71; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych3020007 - 29 Apr 2021
Viewed by 1798
Abstract
[U25] is a German online-peer-counseling service for adolescents with suicidal ideation, who typically do not seek or receive adequate counseling. We conducted an online survey in order to compare persons who receive online counseling by [U25] compared to those who are visitors of [...] Read more.
[U25] is a German online-peer-counseling service for adolescents with suicidal ideation, who typically do not seek or receive adequate counseling. We conducted an online survey in order to compare persons who receive online counseling by [U25] compared to those who are visitors of [U25] websites but do not (yet) receive counseling. Via online survey, all visitors to the [U25] websites were invited to fill in a questionnaire on sociodemographic data, utilization reasons, and barriers. Our final sample consisted of n = 318 counseling clients, n = 1127 persons who have not yet sought help but intend to do so (“prospective clients”), and n = 444 persons who do not consider [U25] counseling for themselves (“refusers”). Clients were more often female and showed positive attitudes toward online counseling. Low perceived need for counseling was the most frequent barrier reported by the refusers, whereas fear of stigma and practical barriers were rarely reported; younger and male refusers reported needing to write down one’s problems as a barrier more often. Self-selection might reduce generalizability of our results. Online counseling can facilitate receiving psychosocial support for young persons with suicidal ideation, particularly if barriers are addressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technology and Online Mental Health Support)
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