Surfaces and Aesthetic Properties of Polymers

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Processing and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 8811

Special Issue Editors

Water Research Center, New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi 129188, United Arab Emirates
Interests: polymeric fibers; dyes; plasma treatment; ozonation; fuel cells; catalysts; coatings; gun spray; electrospinning; printing; coloration; biomedical; ultrasonication
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nano Fusion Technology Research Group, Institute for Fiber Engineering (IFES), Interdisciplinary Cluster for Cutting Edge Research (ICCER), Shinshu University, Tokida 3-15-1, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567, Japan
Interests: nanofibers; electrospinning; bio-medical; sensors; carbon materials; food packing; nano-catalysis; supercapacitor; drug delivery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Centre of Excellence in Nanotechnology and Materials, Mehran University of Engineering and Technology, Jamshoro 76060, Pakistan
Interests: advanced textiles; nanofibers mass production; electrospinning; dyeing; surface treatments; environment; adsorption; advanced apparel applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surface and aesthetic properties are influenced by the chemical and physical properties of polymers. Thus, substantial improvements are needed in order to explore and achieve ultimate applications with an understanding of the precise relationships between these properties. Aesthetic and surface characteristics are two important factors affected by various properties of natural and synthetic polymers, such as wettability, cell adhesion, adsorption, absorption, and chemical/gas separation. The scope of this Special Issue is related to the environment, energy, textile, biomedical, and chemical applications. The issue will also cover the surface interactions of external guest molecules such as metals, inks, dyes, acids, alkalis, or any surface treatments (plasma, ozone, or other physical treatment) with polymer-based materials, serving a variety of advanced applications including cell culture, cell adhesion, aesthetic and morphological improvements, adsorption, absorption, batteries, and fuel cells but not limited to these.

Dr. Muzamil Khatri
Prof. Dr. Ick-Soo Kim
Prof. Dr. Zeeshan Khatri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  •     aesthetic properties
  •     morphology
  •     wettability
  •     cell adhesion
  •     cell culture
  •     antibacterial and antioxidant activity
  •     adsorption
  •     fibers
  •     catalysts
  •     coatings
  •     surface treatments
  •     dyeing
  •     mass production
  •     natural ingredients
  •     ultrasonic energy

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 3619 KiB  
Article
Retentive Forces and Deformation of Fitting Surface in RPD Clasp Made of Polyether-Ether-Ketone (PEEK)
by Sunil Kumar Vaddamanu, Fahad Hussain Alhamoudi, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Nasser M. Alqahtani, Mohamed Khaled Addas, Mohammad Al Alfarsi, Rajesh Vyas, Masroor Ahmed Kanji, Mohammad A. Zarbah, Waleed M. S. Alqahtani, Saeed M. Alqahtani, Adel M. Abdelmonem and Asim Elsir Elmahdi
Polymers 2023, 15(4), 956; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15040956 - 15 Feb 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2210
Abstract
Background: Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has provided the option to fabricate RPDs with aesthetics unlike metal RPDs, but little attention has been paid to its suitability, especially towards the retentive forces and deformation of the clasp. This study aimed to examine the retentive forces and [...] Read more.
Background: Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has provided the option to fabricate RPDs with aesthetics unlike metal RPDs, but little attention has been paid to its suitability, especially towards the retentive forces and deformation of the clasp. This study aimed to examine the retentive forces and the fitting surface (inner surface) deformation of clasps made from PEEK and compare it with cobalt–chromium (Co-Cr) clasp. Methods: Forty-two circumferential clasps (14 Co-Cr and 28 PEEK) were fabricated and divided into two groups with clasp undercuts (0.25 mm and 0.5 mm) with thicknesses of 1 mm and 1.5 mm. Each was examined for retentive forces after cycle test on its abutment for 360 cycles. Initial and final retentive forces were recorded. The fitting surface deformation was determined using 3-Matic research analysis software. Results: The results revealed that highest mean initial retentive force was of Co-Cr clasps with 0.50 mm undercut 22.26 N (±10.15 N), and the lowest was the 1 mm PEEK clasps with 0.25 mm undercut 3.35 N (±0.72 N) and highest mean final retentive force was the Co-Cr clasps with 0.50 mm undercut 21.40 N (±9.66 N), and the lowest was the 1 mm PEEK clasps with 0.25 mm undercut 2.71 N (±0.47 N). PEEK clasps had a lower retentive force than Co-Cr clasps with 0.50 undercut. PEEK clasps (1.5 mm) at 0.25 mm undercut had the least deformation (35.3 µm). PEEK showed significantly less deformation (p ≤ 0.014) than Co-Cr. Conclusion: The deformation of PEEK clasps fitting surface was lower than Co-Cr clasps and retentive forces were close to the Co-Cr clasps, suggesting the use of PEEK as an aesthetic clasp option for RPD framework. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surfaces and Aesthetic Properties of Polymers)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 5094 KiB  
Article
A Facile Molding Method of Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites and Its Mechanical Property
by Jian Shi, Mamoru Mizuno, Limin Bao and Chunhong Zhu
Polymers 2022, 14(5), 947; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14050947 - 26 Feb 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3275
Abstract
The mechanical properties of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (C-FRTP) composites are commonly lower than those of continuous fiber-reinforced thermosetting plastic (C-FRP) composites. We have developed a new molding method for C-FRTP. In this study, pre-impregnated materials were successfully prepared by polymer solution impregnation method [...] Read more.
The mechanical properties of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (C-FRTP) composites are commonly lower than those of continuous fiber-reinforced thermosetting plastic (C-FRP) composites. We have developed a new molding method for C-FRTP. In this study, pre-impregnated materials were successfully prepared by polymer solution impregnation method and, finally, C-FRTP was fabricated. The viscosity of the thermoplastic matrix was decreased to approximately 3dPa×s, the same level of epoxy, and the fiber volume fraction was increased from approximately 45 to 60%. The cross-section of specimens were polished by an ion milling system and impregnation condition was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The micrographs suggested that thermoplastic polymer was impregnated to every corner of the fiber, and no void was found on the cross-section. It revealed that void-free composites with perfect mechanical properties can be manufactured with this new molding method. All specimens were submitted to a mechanical measuring equipment, and the mechanical properties of the composite specimens were investigated. Mechanical analysis revealed that tensile property and flexural property of C-FRTP were enhanced up to the same level with C-FRP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surfaces and Aesthetic Properties of Polymers)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

12 pages, 2237 KiB  
Article
Preparation of a Cage-Type Polyglycolic Acid/Collagen Nanofiber Blend with Improved Surface Wettability and Handling Properties for Potential Biomedical Applications
by Sofia El-Ghazali, Hisatoshi Kobayashi, Muzamil Khatri, Duy-Nam Phan, Zeeshan Khatri, Sheeraz Khan Mahar, Shunichi Kobayashi and Ick-Soo Kim
Polymers 2021, 13(20), 3458; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13203458 - 9 Oct 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2094
Abstract
Electrospun biobased polymeric nanofiber blends are widely used as biomaterials for different applications, such as tissue engineering and cell adhesion; however, their surface wettability and handling require further improvements for their practical utilization in the assistance of surgical operations. Therefore, Polyglycolic acid (PGA) [...] Read more.
Electrospun biobased polymeric nanofiber blends are widely used as biomaterials for different applications, such as tissue engineering and cell adhesion; however, their surface wettability and handling require further improvements for their practical utilization in the assistance of surgical operations. Therefore, Polyglycolic acid (PGA) and collagen-based nanofibers with three different ratios (40:60, 50:50 and 60:40) were prepared using the electrospinning method, and their surface wettability was improved using ozonation and plasma (nitrogen) treatment. The effect on the wettability and the morphology of pristine and blended PGA and collagen nanofibers was assessed using the WCA test and SEM, respectively. It was observed that PGA/collagen with the ratio 60:40 was the optimal blend, which resulted in nanofibers with easy handling and bead-free morphology that could maintain their structural integrity even after the surface treatments, imparting hydrophilicity on the surface, which can be advantageous for cell adhesion applications. Additionally, a cage-type collector was used during the electrospinning process to provide better handling properties to (PGA/collagen 60:40) blend. The resultant nanofiber mat was then incorporated with activated poly (α,β-malic acid) to improve its surface hydrophilicity. The chemical composition of PGA/collagen 60:40 was assessed using FTIR spectroscopy, supported by Raman spectroscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surfaces and Aesthetic Properties of Polymers)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop