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Inorganic Nanomaterials

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019) | Viewed by 6931

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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

At the interface between nanomaterials and biological systems, an understanding of the interactions between them is of significant interest. Biomolecules, such as DNA, proteins, peptides, virus, enzymes, biopolymers, and others, have unique abilities to form hierarchical and ordered 1D, 2D, and 3D nanostructures and nanomaterials by molecular self-assembly in liquid, solid surface, and air–water interfaces. The resulting bionanomaterials may have potential applications as novel fibers, sensors, adhesives, energy generating and so on, that can be applied in the fields of biomedical engineering, tissue engineering, biosensors, nanotechnology, energy materials, and others. This Special Issue aims to collect and disseminate some of the most significant and recent contributions in the interdisciplinary area of bio-nanomaterials research. Both original research and review papers are welcome.

I am looking forward to your contributions to this Special Issue.

Best regards,

Prof. Dr. Ick-Soo Kim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Self-assembly Nanomaterials
  • Nanotechnology
  • Nanofibers
  • Biopolymers
  • Nanocatalysts
  • Functional tailoring
  • Hybrid materials
  • Tissue engineering
  • Drug delivery
  • Biosensors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 7155 KiB  
Article
High Concentrations of Polyelectrolyte Complex Nanoparticles Decrease Activity of Osteoclasts
by Vivien Kauschke, Felix Maximilian Hessland, David Vehlow, Martin Müller, Christian Heiss and Katrin Susanne Lips
Molecules 2019, 24(12), 2346; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24122346 - 25 Jun 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3274
Abstract
Fracture treatment in osteoporotic patients is still challenging. Osteoporosis emerges when there is an imbalance between bone formation and resorption in favor of resorption by osteoclasts. Thus, new implant materials for osteoporotic fracture treatment should promote bone formation and reduce bone resorption. Nanoparticles [...] Read more.
Fracture treatment in osteoporotic patients is still challenging. Osteoporosis emerges when there is an imbalance between bone formation and resorption in favor of resorption by osteoclasts. Thus, new implant materials for osteoporotic fracture treatment should promote bone formation and reduce bone resorption. Nanoparticles can serve as drug delivery systems for growth factors like Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), which stimulated osteoblast differentiation. Therefore, polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles (PEC-NPs) consisting of poly(l-lysine) (PLL) and cellulose sulfate (CS), with or without addition of BDNF, were used to analyze their effect on osteoclasts in vitro. Live cell images showed that osteoclast numbers decreased after application of high PLL/CS PEC-NPs concentrations independent of whether BDNF was added or not. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that relative mRNA expression of cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor significantly declined after incubation of osteoclasts with high concentrations of PLL/CS PEC-NPs. Furthermore, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay indicated that tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase 5b activity was significantly reduced in the presence of high PLL/CS PEC-NPs concentrations. Consistent with these results, the pit formation analysis showed that less hydroxyapatite was resorbed by osteoclasts after incubation with high concentrations of PLL/CS PEC-NPs. BDNF had no influence on osteoclasts. We conclude that highly concentrated PLL/CS PEC-NPs dosages decreased osteoclastogenesis and osteoclasts activity. Moreover, BDNF might be a promising growth factor for osteoporotic fracture treatment since it did not increase osteoclast activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inorganic Nanomaterials)
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13 pages, 6821 KiB  
Article
Design of an Amphiphilic Poly(aspartamide)-Mediated Self-Assembled Nanoconstruct for Long-Term Tumor Targeting and Bioimaging
by Kondareddy Cherukula, Saji Uthaman and In-Kyu Park
Molecules 2019, 24(5), 885; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24050885 - 2 Mar 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3191
Abstract
Biodegradable polymers have been developed for the targeted delivery of therapeutics to tumors. However, tumor targeting and imaging are usually limited by systemic clearance and non-specific adsorption. In this study, we used poly(amino acid) derivatives, such as poly(succinimide), to synthesize a nanomicelle-forming poly(hydroxyethylaspartamide) [...] Read more.
Biodegradable polymers have been developed for the targeted delivery of therapeutics to tumors. However, tumor targeting and imaging are usually limited by systemic clearance and non-specific adsorption. In this study, we used poly(amino acid) derivatives, such as poly(succinimide), to synthesize a nanomicelle-forming poly(hydroxyethylaspartamide) (PHEA, P) modified sequentially with octadecylamine, polyethylene glycol (PEG, P), and glycine (G) to design PHEA-PEG-glycine (PPG) nanoparticles (NPs). These PPG NPs were further tethered to cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp (cRGD) sequences for formulating tumor-targeting PPG-cRGD NPs, and then loaded with IR-780 dye (PPG-cRGD-IR-780) for visualizing tumor homing. cRGD cloaked in PPG NPs could bind specifically to both tumor endothelium and cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrins. PPG-cRGD NPs exhibited enhanced physiological stability, cellular viability, and targeted intracellular uptake in cancer cells. In addition, PPG-cRGD NPs offered enhanced systemic circulation, leading to preferential tumor targeting and prolonged fluorescence tumor imaging for nearly 30 days. Nevertheless, non-targeted formulations demonstrated premature systemic clearance with short-term tumor imaging. Histochemical analysis showed no damage to normal organs, reaffirming the biocompatibility of PHEA polymers. Overall, our results indicated that PPG-cRGD NPs, which were manipulated to obtain optimal particle size and surface charge, and were complemented with tumor targeting, could improve the targeted and theranostic potential of therapeutic delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inorganic Nanomaterials)
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